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First Time Building Computer


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#1 gswarriors

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 02:03 AM

So i decided to build my first computer. I feel so clueless at this point. My price range is about $1,000 w/o mouse, keyboard, monitor, and speakers. I am planing to use intel and would like to have a wireless card build in. I plan on using vista home premium, but have no clue what is the difference between 32 and 64 bit. I would like to use 4gb of memory and 500 gb on the hard drive. I am not sure what kinda of video card i should use and motherboard and etc.

Edited by gswarriors, 02 July 2008 - 02:25 AM.


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#2 dc3

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 04:24 AM

The first step in building a computer is to decide what CPU you wish to go with. At the moment the Intel Core 2 Duo is being recognized as one of the best by many.

Once you have decided on the CPU it's time to choose a motherboard. Since you know what CPU you are going to be using you know what socket type you will need for the motherboard. From here you need to decide what options you wish to have with the motherboard. For instance, do you wish to utilize Crossfire or SLI?

Choosing your RAM would be the next step, you can go to most any major RAM manufacturer's web site and use their search tool to find what RAM is compatible with your motherboard. I have a preference for Crucial. The amount of RAM that you purchase will be limited by the motherboard and the Operating System. A 32-bit OS will only recognize up to 4GB, a 64-bit OS will recognize up to 16TB.

One consideration when purchasing the PSU will be the Wattage and Amperage requirements of the graphics card, and if you choose to use two cards in either Crossfire or SLI you will need a PSU that will support the two cards.

If you are going to be playing games you will want a dedicated graphics card, there are others here that are more familiar with what currently is favored. There are two different modes of running dual graphics cards, Crossfire, and SLI.

Choosing a hard drive is pretty straight forward, SATA hdds are the current state of the art, the question is how large of a drive do you want? With the addition of SP2 in XP the previous 133GB limitation was expanded to 4GB. Vista is capable of running large hdds as is.

The components that are installed in the case are all ATX form factor, this means that they meet industry standards so that they will fit in the case. But there are some instances where they vary, the size of the motherboard will make a difference in what case you purchase. Motherboards come in ATX, Mini ATX, and Extended ATX sizes. Another consideration when choosing a case is the number of bays that you will want for hard drives or optical drives.

Other parts like optical drives, floppy disc drive, and expansion cards like a modem or a NIC (Network Interface Card) will be your personal choice to meet your needs.

There are a couple of good tutorials online for building computers.

This tutorial has lots of photographs which helps with the installation.

This tutorial has very good in depth instructions.

Once you make your decision on the components, post them back here and we can help with any suggestions that need to be made.

Edited by dc3, 02 July 2008 - 05:20 AM.

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#3 Sterling14

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 05:34 AM

For a processor, I would go with the Intel Core 2 Duo E8400, which is just under 200$. If you want to play games, I'd suggest the new ATI 4850 ($200) or the better 4870 ($300). If you wanted some extreme performance, you could do crossfire, which is having two ATI graphics cards, with two 4850's. You could probably play Crysis on high/very high settings without much lag, and any other game on highest settings without lag.

Once you start getting into dual video cards though, you'll have to pay more for a better motherboard, and also more for a better power supply. This can start getting expensive quickly.

If you're going to game, don't go cheap on a wireless card. I bought one that seemed pretty decent for about $25. It's good for net surfing, but when I play games online, it will have the occasional lag hiccups. I wouldn't spend less then $40-$50 on a good wireless card for gaming.

These are just some of my suggestions/opinions though. Feel free to disagree :thumbsup: .
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 07:33 PM

Building a new PC can be fun but also daunting and little confusing. Here are some pointers:

SLI or Crossfire is a technology that lets you combine two or more cards into one really powerful graphics solution. Your motherboard usually supports one or the other.

Wi-Fi will let you connect to a network without wires, some motherboards don't have this built in (even some high-end ones), check before purchasing. For motherboards, I suggest buying Asus, eVGA, and XFX. For wireless cards I use D-Link.

There are graphics cards for every budget, nVidia's GeForce 9 series is a good balance between price and power, ATI has some good choices too.

Your choice of 32 and 64 bit can be confusing. I've used the 64-bit edition of Vista for over a year. A 64-bit OS will allow the computer to use 4GB or more of RAM. Vista 64 has more security features built in than the 32-bit. With a new PC, drivers aren't much of an issue since 64-bit Vista requires a digitally signed driver. Most companies that make Vista drivers make 32 and 64-bit drivers. Keep in mind that some programs have issues with compatibility on 64-bit Vista. You can still run almost all your old 32-bit software, but there is a chance that your program will be incompatible. I've only had one program refuse to work. If you buy native 64-bit software, you will notice a substantial speed increase over 32-bit.

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#5 gswarriors

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 08:59 PM

So this is what i have at the moment. Plz feel free to suggest any part change or anything. Thanx

Cpu:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115037
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115028
i have no idea what is the difference so i posted both up (plz tell me which one is better). $190

Motherboard:
i cant really decided yet so ?????? any more suggestions.

Hard Drive:
Are all hard drives sold as OEM???? and what is the difference from retail???
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16822136218
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16822148298
$130

Video Card:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16814500037
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16814150292
I don‚„t mind spending a little bit more for a video card but tell me which one is worth the price and which brand is better

RAM:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16820145197
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16820220286

PSU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817171017
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817182072
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817182070
I don‚„t noe which one is the best buy and do I need this much power

Dvd-Burner:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16827135168
If you have any other suggestion plz give me.

OS:
Ill probably be using windows vista home premium 64-bit
Monitor:
I already have one

Mouse:
I have one

Keyboard:
I have one

Case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811146047
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811133021
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811144198
Although I have no clue if these would work with the parts I want.

Also could you tell me if these would be compatible with each other

Edited by gswarriors, 02 July 2008 - 09:03 PM.


#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 09:26 PM

CPU: The E8400 is a 45nm chip which doesn't use as much power and runs cooler whereas the E6850 is of an older design.
Motherboard: The EVGA 750i is a good choice in that it will allow for SLI and the newer Intel chips, it's a little expensive though.
Hard Disk: I would go for retail as you'll be covered under the manufacturer's warranty. OEM parts can be good too. OEM parts are usually just the drive and nothing else.
RAM: I would go for the first one, the heat sink on the second one may be problematic. Keep in mind that your motherboard (EVGA 750i) supports up to 8GB of RAM.
Graphics Card: Both are pretty much the same thing, the price difference may reflect additional bundled items.
PSU: I've got Corsair and Silverstone PSU's. Unless you SLI the cards and have several hard drives, 750W should be sufficient.
Optical Drive: Good choice.
Case: It's largely a personal choice balancing aesthetics, noise, and price. Keep in mind that metal cases are more durable but is often a little louder than the plastic.

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#7 gswarriors

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 10:09 PM

do you noe if cod4 and starcraft will be able to play on 64 bit
also i wont need sli and i wont upgrade my intel chips.
but thanx for the adivce on the other things

Edited by gswarriors, 02 July 2008 - 10:24 PM.


#8 dc3

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 10:20 PM

One of the problems with the Vista 64-bit OS is the lack, so far, of compatible software. You will need to google the application that you wish to add to see if they are Vista ready. Google is your friend. :thumbsup:

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#9 gswarriors

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 10:36 PM

ok i have fixed up the list. i still need help finding the right motherboard.
plz tell me if all these parts are compatible.

Cpu:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115037
190

Motherboard:

Hard Drive:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16822136185
100

Video Card:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16814150292
220

RAM:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16820145197
136

Dvd-Burner:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16827135168
27

OS:
Ill probably be using windows vista home premium 64-bit
240

Monitor:
I already have one

Mouse:
I have one

Keyboard:
I have one

Case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811133021
170

PSU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817182069
105

Edited by gswarriors, 02 July 2008 - 11:42 PM.


#10 DJBPace07

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 06:14 PM

Most decent motherboards come with two PCI Express X16 slots, some even have three. Since you're not going to SLI (not yet anyway) you shouldn't spend money and get the three slots, two should do nicely. I would suggest the EVGA 680i, but it doesn't work well with the new 45nm processors. I still suggest the EVGA 750i or better. You could also use the Asus 750i but it takes DDR2 800 memory not the 1066 you selected. You can still buy the 1066 memory to use in a DDR2 800 board since it is backwards compatible. That said, any of these boards should do nicely.

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#11 dc3

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 10:31 PM

If you are going to purchase a motherboard that has two SLI slots, look at the motherboard and make sure that there is good separation between the two so that there will be good ventilation. This is a serious consideration when considering the heat that the cards can generate.

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#12 DJBPace07

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 09:52 PM

If you are going to purchase a motherboard that has two SLI slots, look at the motherboard and make sure that there is good separation between the two so that there will be good ventilation. This is a serious consideration when considering the heat that the cards can generate.


Indeed, heat is the number one issue with computers. Generally, most motherboards follow various standards that specify the amount of space between each slot. This should not be much of an issue unless you decide to SLI two graphics cards. The 9800 GTX is a dual slotted card, meaning that one slot is used for the actual card and its connection to the motherboard, and the other slot is used for the heatsink and fan unit attached to the card. Thankfully, the 9800 GTX is a cool card (heat wise) and temperatures within the case shouldn't be an issue. Are you planning on using the stock CPU cooler for the processor or are you going to go for an after market one?

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#13 dc3

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 10:07 PM

"Indeed, heat is the number one issue with computers. Generally, most motherboards follow various standards that specify the amount of space between each slot".


This is true, but what I was referring to was the placement of the PCI-E 2.0 slots from each other. This Asus motherboard is a good example of what I'm talking about. There are three slots between the two PCI-E 2.0 slots.

Edited by dc3, 04 July 2008 - 10:21 PM.

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#14 Lucky23

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 11:07 AM

I dont know why you would spend that much for the retail version of windows when you can get the OEM version for alot cheaper. It would save you some money.
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#15 DJBPace07

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 06:36 PM

Save yourself the money and go for the OEM edition of Vista, just make sure you know the licensing limitations. As for that Asus motherboard, it has been known to run very hot, most motherboards do not have three slots in between the PCI express slots. The Asus Striker Formula mobo is a modified 780i, typically the 780i motherboards have one slot in between each PCIexpress slot.

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