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Want 2 Build But Afraid


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#1 fish_out_of_water

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Posted 29 June 2008 - 11:17 PM

:thumbsup: My working knowledge consists of the power button & freecell. Have spent a week researching and selecting components. $$$ will be right n 1 month. Not really intimidated by the hardware assembly, just know little or nothing about software or actual computer operation except 4 surfing & solitare. Want 2 install winxp pro but don't know if it will still b available. Have read nothing but good about xp & have on this machine but this is 8 yrs old w/ many issues. Want something new and sweet without a lot of corporate software that takes up space & time. Now i'm just looking for where to find some friendly assistance or should I just fold my hand & leave it to the pros???
when all is said and done, there's nothing left to say or do...

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#2 Vaerli

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 01:32 AM

I just recently bought a new computer and stuck it together myself. First time, and it was about 1000$ of components (not including the monitor) that I was risking. I know a decent amount about the stuff, but I still ran into trouble. If your knowledge doesn't go much further than surfing and solitare, then I wouldn't go for it. I understand what components do, and I help others sometimes also, and it was a bit rough for me.

For most people I suggest building it, but with your limited knowledge, you'll probably be fine with a 600-800$ pre built computer. It sounds like you won't be using much power for what you want to use it for anyways.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 04:41 AM

Building a computer isn't that difficult, one of the hardest parts for a novice is choosing the components. The first thing you need to do is to determine what you are going to be using the computer for as this will dictate the kind of components you will need. The second thing to determine is what your budget is going to be. Once you have determined this we can help you with suggestions for a complete parts list.

Assembling the components isn't that difficult, the motherboard comes with a user's manual which will take you through each step of its installation. The components are keyed so that they will only install one way. The only place that you will need to watch for will be the header for the front panel, these can be installed incorrectly if you don't pay close attention.

There are tutorials available for building and installing the components and software that have photographs and easy to understand instruction, below are two examples.

Here is a good tutorial for installing Windows XP.

Here is a good tutorial on building a computer.

We can help you with more specific tutorials once we know what components you are going to be using.

If you can read and follow written instructions, you should be fine.

Edited by dc3, 30 June 2008 - 09:57 AM.

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#4 fish_out_of_water

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 08:05 AM

OK... let's see if I can do this!



CP1-DUO-E8400 :: Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Processor BX80570E8400 - 3.0GHz, 6MB Cache, 1333MHz FSB, Wolfdale, Dual-Core, Retail, Socket 775, Processor with Fan (0.85 lbs)



I69-2164 :: Intel DX48BT2 Motherboard - Intel X48, Socket 775, ATX, Audio, PCI Express 2.0, CrossFire Ready, Gigabit LAN, USB 2.0, Firewire, eSATA, RAID (3.7 lbs)

C13-6102 :: Corsair Dual Channel 4096MB PC12800 DDR3 1600MHz Memory (2 x 2048MB) (0.3 lbs) T925-2288 :: Thermaltake VI1000BWS M9 ATX Mid-Tower Case - Clear Side, Front USB, Audio Ports (30 lbs)
T925-2060 :: Thermaltake PurePower 430-Watt Power Supply - ATX, Dual 80mm Fan, 20/24-Pin, SATA Ready, PCI-E Ready (4.55 lbs) E145-8600 :: EVGA GeForce 8600 GT / 256MB GDDR3 / SLI Ready / PCI Express / DL Dual DVI / HDTV / Video Card (1.45 lbs)

C44-3272 :: Creative Labs Sound Blaster Audigy SE (0.8 lbs) TSD-500AAKS :: Western Digital Caviar SE16 500GB Hard Drive - 7200, 16MB, SATA-300, OEM (1.55 lbs)
P129-1006 :: Philips SPD2413BD Super All-Write DVD Burner - 20x DVDR Burn, 16x DVDR Read, 8x DVD+RW, 6x DVD-RW, 8x DVDR DL, 12x DVD-RAM, 48x32x CD-R/RW, Black (2.2 lbs) Not sure how to post these items as a link but here they are...will have 2 optical drives...have replaced boards, etc. so I am somewhat familiar w/ inside...just never have been much of a tekkie but want to learn a little. Plan to use mostly for music, (photoshopping & Home movie editing, MUST LEARN!!!). If I get all this together am sure i will think i need more but hopefully this is a good start. THANX so mush 4 the tutorial links.
when all is said and done, there's nothing left to say or do...

#5 Lucky23

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 05:13 PM

i would read alot expecially if you havent ever installed anything on a computer before. If you dont read then you can run into alot of problems. Search yahoo there are many articles about building a computer.
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#6 Venek

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 06:42 PM

When I got out of college back in '99, I bought a Dell because I didn't know squat about computers and how they worked. I just wanted to get online and play games, that's it. Well, inevitably, I started running into problems. I'd call tech support and I'd get some Indian lady who barely spoke English. And I'm hard-of-hearing on top of that. I got tired of spending hours on the phone so I decided to solve my own problems. That's how my education started.

My very first upgrade was more RAM. I remember being nervous that I'd somehow fry the whole thing and was relieved to learn that it was far easier than I thought and that computer stores were ripping people off left and right just for installing RAM. So, little by little, I upgraded various components. A video card here, a new DVD drive there, better fans, and additional hard drives. I also learned all about erasing and formatting my hard drive, all the way back to Win98. All that was over the course of several years and countless hours spent on the Internet researching.

It was only about a year and a half ago that I built my own computer. Just over this past weekend I did a massive upgrade with my video cards and computer case. I knew exactly what I wanted but only because I had a ton of experience to fall back on.

You, on the other hand, are jumping in very cold water. If you're committed to building your own computer, I'd advise you to do a ton of research and reading before you actually buy anything. I can tell you that the most important topics you should learn about is compatibility and cooling. It's nice to have a million options out there for building your dream machine, but it's all for naught if you buy the wrong kind of processor for the motherboard, or if the case isn't big enough.

If I were you, I'd start off by buying a computer from a place that will custom build it for you. They may be a little pricey, but at least you'd get what you want. Even better is that when you want to start upgrading, you can do it a little bit at a time like I did.

Best of luck, whatever you decide to do.
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#7 ReconGamer

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 12:52 AM

I myself was scared completely when I built my PC. Im a gamer myself, As you look to be by those system specs.
One day after I got all my parts I said to myself, Alrighty. Lets just do this already.
I found really helpful links on google about how to put together the PC.
The only part I found hard was all the connectors to the motherboard, I didn't read the Mobo instruction manual >.>.
Its really easy. And once you've done it, You can brag to you're friends :thumbsup:


BTW, Crossfire is the Dual video card version of ATI, SLI which that video card is enabled to is the Nvidia dual video card.
Later on if you prefer to get a second video card you would have to get a new motherboard, As that mother board does not support SLI, only Crossfire.
May want to up the PSU just for the extra volts if ever needed.

#8 fish_out_of_water

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 01:52 AM

Not really into gaming(yet!?) more into media center type stuff. If I manage to pull off this build may even offer 2 do 4 some jealous friends. New specs if it's OK 2 post...If anybody looks n on this...could use all the advice i can get. i'll just soak it all up & c what i can squeeze out of it!
  • ASUS P5Q Pro LGA 775 Intel P45 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
  • Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Wolfdale 3.0GHz LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor Model BX80570E8400 - Retail
  • OCZ Reaper HPC 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066 (PC2 8500) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model OCZ2RPR10664GK - Retail
  • Thermaltake M9 VI1000BNS Black SECC Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Retail
  • XCLIO STABLEPOWER 500W 500W ATX Power Supply - Retail
  • Creative Sound Blaster SB0570 Audigy SE 7.1 Channels PCI Interface Sound Card - Retail
  • EVGA 256-P2-N751-TR GeForce 8600 GT 256MB 128-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 SLI Supported Video Card - Retail
  • Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
  • PHILIPS 20X DVDR DVD Burner with LightScribe 2-Tone IDE Model SPD6004BD - Retail
  • ASUS 20X DVDR DVD Burner with LightScribe Black SATA Model DRW-2014L1T - Retail
  • Logitech X-540 70 watts 5.1 Speaker
  • Acer AL2216Wbd Black 22" 5ms Widescreen LCD Monitor
Trying 2 different opticals just 2 c which 1 i like...anyway looking forward 2 getting my hands dirty...you guys have been great so far!!! :thumbsup:
when all is said and done, there's nothing left to say or do...

#9 ReconGamer

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 01:24 PM

If you're going for media center stuff, That computer is great! But like I said above, if you'd ever try to get a second graphics card for SLI, since that 8600 GT is a Nvidia card, You would have to get a completely new motherboard since it supports Crossfire, The ATI version. But if you dont plan to thats a great build. And later on you could just purchase a much better card that still runs off of PCI Express 2.0. Good luck to ya in your pc build. It'll be fun, you'll enjoy it :thumbsup:

#10 DJBPace07

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 07:21 PM

If you're going for the Media Center PC, you should get the Asus Xonar sound card. It has many Dolby technologies and it's designed to be a high-end surround sound card. Besides, the Audigy SE is designed as a budget card and doesn't do surround sound very well. Also, you'll want a case that has silent (or nearly silent) fans, here is a site that can help create a quiet PC. Reminder, with 4GB of RAM, you will not be able to use all 4GB unless you have a 64-bit OS. In a 32-bit environment, you will only be able to use 3-3.5 GB of it. Since this is going to be a media center PC, are you going to add a TV tuner it?

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#11 fish_out_of_water

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 09:10 PM

Yes...TV tuner will definitely come somewhere down the road. Just looking to build a decent running rig that won't have to be upgraded in 6 months(LOL)

Have looked at Hauppauge & VisionTek...any thoughts?

Edited by fish_out_of_water, 02 July 2008 - 09:11 PM.

when all is said and done, there's nothing left to say or do...

#12 DJBPace07

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 09:29 PM

You can get external and internal TV tuners. I've got the AverMedia M780 PCI express TV tuner. Depending on what you put into your PCI slots, you may be limited to a PCI Express card. The M780 is a good choice, it does get a little hot. The Hauppauge WinTV-PVR USB2 is another good choice if you don't want to open the PC or have no free slots. Both come with Media Center remotes.

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