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Dell M-board Intel Core 2 Duo To 64-bit Proc


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#1 bigalexe

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 09:30 PM

Ok ive done alot of things to my computer i added a wireless card, upgraded the video from stock to an Nvidia 8600 (G84 GPU), added a gig or RAM, and lights. So im comfortable mucking around inside a pc case. I think the next step is to max out RAM and then replace the Mainboard and Processor. I currently have an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66ghz processor and the stock Dell Dimension E510 board. I want to upgrade to an SLI capable board and an AMD 64-bit processor. My current power supply can support it for those that are wondering.

I need to know what i need to do so my computer can support the new processor and mainboard. Basically im wondering if Windows XP 32-bit will run off a 64-bit and also will that massive of a hardware necessitate me reinstalling the OS and starting from scratch. I am also considering a case change when i do this.

I use my computer for a little gaming and alot of CAD.
AMD Phenom II X6 2.8ghz
8GB DDR3 RAM
XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 1 GB DDR5, 26" Widescreen HDMI
500GB + 80GB HDD
Windows 7 Pro, Mozilla Firefox, AutoCAD 2011, Solidworks 2009
1/19/2012

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#2 Sterling14

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 07:17 AM

You will have to get a new case. The dell connections for the power switch and I think the fans, are all unique so they only work with other Dells cases and motherboards. Besides that, you should be able to use all the parts you have now and put them in a new motherboard.

I'm wondering why you would want to downgrade to an AMD processsor. An Intel core 2 Duo, 2.66 is better than most AMD's. I believe it is better than the AMD X2 6000+ (3.0ghz). You at least would not see much of a difference.

Your processor now is a 64-bit processor. Most modern processors made in the past few years are 64-bit. You can run 32-bit windows xp off of one fine.

For SLI, make sure it has a Nvidia chipset. Intel chipsets with dual pciex16 slots only work with Crossfire and so do AMD chipsets.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#3 bigalexe

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 11:55 AM

My current computer originally purchased August 2006

Dell Dimension E510 Case (OEM)
Dell Dimension E510 Mainboard (OEM)
Thermal Take Purepower 2.0 600W PSU - SLI READY
XFX Nvidia 8600 GT 256MB DDR3 - SLI READY
Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 ghz processor (Dual Core and Not 64-bit)
DVD-RW Drive (OEM)
Case Fan connectod to mainboard is OEM
2GB RAM DDR2
80 GIG SATA HD

I dont know where you get off thinking that my processor is a 64-bit and that an AMD is a worse processor. Also Dell switched to standard ATX connectors awhile back which you can find on most tech sites. I want the new board for 2 reasons, the first reason is i want SLI capability and second i want Overclockability (i made that word up) and im afraid to do it on an OEM board.
AMD Phenom II X6 2.8ghz
8GB DDR3 RAM
XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 1 GB DDR5, 26" Widescreen HDMI
500GB + 80GB HDD
Windows 7 Pro, Mozilla Firefox, AutoCAD 2011, Solidworks 2009
1/19/2012

#4 Sterling14

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 01:33 PM

All processors made in the past few years by Intel and AMD are 64-bit. A core 2 duo is a dual-core processor and it is 64-bit.

In general, dual-core AMD processors aren't as good as Intel. If you notice the price difference between them, it is usually significant though. Amd makes slower processors, but they are cheaper. If you already have an Intel core 2 duo at 2.66ghz, it's not worth it to get an AMD processor. Unless you get the top of the line ones, your Intel core 2 duo should be faster or about the same.

For the Dell case/motherboard, I don't mean the ATX power connection, I mean the little cables that go from the case to the motherboard so when you press the button on your computer, it turns on. Dells are unique and don't work with other motherboards in this way. An ATX motherboard put into a Dell case would fit, and everything would fit in fine, its just this tiny little factor that makes it not work.

If you want a board that will run SLI well, you shouldn't spend less then $150.

Edited by Sterling14, 23 June 2008 - 01:35 PM.

"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#5 garmanma

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 02:19 PM

will that massive of a hardware necessitate me reinstalling the OS

In all probability, yes

My current power supply can support it for those that are wondering.

It should but you might be reaching it's limit
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#6 bigalexe

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 05:13 PM

If my processor is a 64-bit why isnt it labeled as such and why didnt my system ship with WinXP Pro 64-bit edition instead of the 32-bit edition, are you telling me that Dell isnt in on a secret? I dont recall 64-bit software being offered during the time i purchased my system new. Id really like to see your source regarding this information.

PC Wizard tells me i have the following:
Type : Intel Pentium XE
Internal Specification : Intel® Pentium® D CPU 2.66GHz
Codename : SmithField
Revision : B0
Technology : 0.09µ
CPU ID : F.4.7
CPU IDEx : F.4.7
Microcode : MU0F4703

I dont see a 64-bit listing there.

Oh and when you were talking about power connectors i though u meant how dell used to have their own mainboard to PSU connectors.

Edited by bigalexe, 23 June 2008 - 05:14 PM.

AMD Phenom II X6 2.8ghz
8GB DDR3 RAM
XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 1 GB DDR5, 26" Widescreen HDMI
500GB + 80GB HDD
Windows 7 Pro, Mozilla Firefox, AutoCAD 2011, Solidworks 2009
1/19/2012

#7 Sterling14

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 06:35 PM

http://www.intel.com/products/processor_nu...t/pentium_d.htm . You have a Pentium D 805, as shown as the bottom in the chart. This is straight from the Intel website.

Why your computer, and most new today, are using 32-bit windows is because sometimes 32-bit programs don't run well on a 64-bit OS (operating system, such as Windows). Most programs today are made for 32-bit, but 64-bit still runs them alright. Most people are running 32-bit versions of windows using 64-bit processors. It's not labeled that because I believe it is just assumed all processors made since 2005 are 64-bit.

Also, in your first two post you said a Core 2 Duo 2.66ghz. In this last post you said a Pentium D 2.66ghz. Those are way different processors. I was thinking you had a core 2 duo 2.66ghz which is a pretty nice processor. Now a Pentium D 2.66ghz is pretty old and much slower then a Core 2 Duo. Now that I know this, yes an AMD dual-core processor would be a good upgrade. They are much better then Pentium D's, but not as good as Core 2 Duo's.

I hope this clears things up. Sorry if I sounded a bit mean/angry, but next time try to get things straight so you don't confuse me, haha :thumbsup: .

Edited by Sterling14, 23 June 2008 - 06:37 PM.

"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#8 bigalexe

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 10:17 PM

oh ive always just referred to it as a core 2 duo and people understood what i meant. what im working towards is the CAD computers at school which have 64-bit AMD Processors (the computers are pre-built HP brand). Ive noticed they have in the C:\ directory a folder of "Program Files" and "Program Files x32" or something like it. Basically it seperates the 32 bit and 64 bit programs. The programs I really care about which are Solidworks and AutoCAD run fine in an x64 environment provided i purchase the right editions.
AMD Phenom II X6 2.8ghz
8GB DDR3 RAM
XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 1 GB DDR5, 26" Widescreen HDMI
500GB + 80GB HDD
Windows 7 Pro, Mozilla Firefox, AutoCAD 2011, Solidworks 2009
1/19/2012




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