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Building Top End Gaming System Need Advice


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#1 sakya

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 08:27 PM

I am wanting to build a high end gaming system, good enough to handle any current and near future games at max settings and also be able to handle multimedia sofware. Price isnt too big of a concern but I dont want to spend needlessly. I know my way around computers so im not retarded on this subject I just havnt built my own yet so I dont know what hardware currently out on the market is performing the best. Just looking to hear yalls opinions and experiences with different components and how they worked out. Plus im in a dilemma with the OS, is vista worth it or will be or should I go with something else, im actually getting tired of windows personally and I've heard mac OS and linux are better but I dont know how many games are compatible with those OS. Any input would be great, thanks.

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 11:02 PM

If you're a gamer, Mac and Linux are not good choices. If you're wanting to play games, such as Crysis, at max settings you're going to need a very good PC to do it.

Case: This is largely an aesthetic thing. Get one that looks good for you. Remember, though, that newer graphics cards are large and will take up a great amount of space. I suggest getting an ATX full tower case. They're larger and heavier, but there is plenty of room to work and expand into. Cases made out of aluminum are more durable but often make more noise.

Motherboard: EVGA 750i is an excellent choice. It allows for the latest processors without the extreme costs of the 780i or 790i. The 750i allows for two nVidia cards to be linked in SLI whereas the 780i allows for three. The 790i is pretty much a 780i with DDR3 support which is far more expensive. If you want to SLI three cards, you're stuck with a 780i or a 790i.

Processor: Intel's Core 2 Quad lineup. Many newer games are making better use of the cores, I suggest getting a Q9300 or better, the 45nm technology will allow for cooler and more efficient processing. Plus, it's an excellent processor to overclock. The Quad-core processors are more expensive, they start at about $250, but they are more future-proof. You should also use good cooling with a higher-end processor, I suggest the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro or the Zalman CNPS9500 AT.

Memory: Get as much as you can, but remember, anything over 4GB will require a 64-bit OS to use. Your motherboard supports up to 8GB of RAM. Get your RAM from a good company such as Kingston or Corsair.

Power Supply: A 750W power supply will run most modern computers. A 1000W power supply is needed for people with triple SLI or many hard disks. Some also get 1000W to have a cushion for when they upgrade. A power supply from Corsair or Silverstone is of excellent quality plus they have a good warranty.

Optical Drives: I hear Lite-on drives are good choices.

Hard Disks: I typically get two, one for my operating system and applications, another for movies, music, and pictures.

Soundcards: The motherboard has a sound system integrated. However, if you want a better sounding solution, I suggest getting a soundcard. My personal favorite is the Asus Xonar D2 PCI soundcard. It is a pro-sumer card so it's more expensive, but it does sound really good and has plenty of connectors if you want to have a surround sound setup with Dolby support.

Graphics Cards: I suggest an nVidia GeForce 9800GTX if you're on a budget (when it comes to higher-end cards, anyway). If you're sort of on a budget and are willing to wait a month, go for the 9800GTX+ or the GeForce GTX 260. If money is no issue, go for the GeForce GTX 280. All of these cards allow you to SLI or link them together to make a very powerful graphics system. Keep in mind that to SLI you will need two or more cards. Remember, the 750i allows only for two cards to be linked whereas the 780i and the 790i allow for up to three. As for graphics card manufacturers, I go with EVGA for the warranty and their step-up program.

Operating System: This one can be difficult. Mac is ruled out since you pretty much have to buy a system built by Apple and have them install it. Linux is a good choice for a dual-boot system. Windows has almost all the games. Vista is more mature than it was and I strongly suggest using it. If you're going to get 4GB or more of RAM, you will need a 64-bit OS to use it all. Remember, there are some things you need to be aware of with 64-bit. First, is drivers. Only drivers that are for Vista 64-bit can be used. Almost every company that releases drivers for Vista has 64-bit compatible drivers, but there are rare exceptions. Also, some software may not run properly on 64-bit. Typically, most modern software will run just fine on Vista 64 but there are occasionally problems. I've been running Vista 64 for over a year and have only had one program refuse to work. Also, Vista 64 is more secure than the 32-bit variety. I suggest getting either Home Premium or Ultimate.

Edited by DJBPace07, 23 June 2008 - 06:28 PM.

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#3 sakya

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 05:42 PM

Wow that was real in depth exactly what I was looking for, this will help me out alot. You rock man Thanks!

#4 dark messenger

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 08:04 PM

Id go for the AMD Phenom as the processor :thumbsup:

For the cooling, take the Zalman CNPS9500 AT, I have it, and its good.. Green LED on it to, I like it lolol.

If you really want you could get the antec 900 case...

#5 DJBPace07

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Posted 24 June 2008 - 08:27 PM

I would not go for the AMD Phenom. It's not as good as the Intel Core 2. Sometimes, even when they are at the same clock speed, the Core 2 outperforms the Phenom. Plus, the Intel processors I mentioned are at 45nm making them cooler and more efficient whereas the AMD is 65nm. However, the AMD Phenom processors are less expensive and they're to begin phasing in 45nm manufacturing sometime during the second half of 2008. Plus, AMD is more friendly to overclocking than Intel. Here's an article about the Phenom processors, keep in mind that it is old. The QX9650 is Intel's extremely expensive processor that runs at 3 Ghz. You can make a much less expensive Intel Q9450 run at a stable 3 Ghz, other than the clock speed and locked multiplier, the QX9650 and the Q9450 are pretty much the same.

Edited by DJBPace07, 24 June 2008 - 08:28 PM.

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