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Set Vb. Net Aside And Jump Into C++ Or Java?


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#1 phale

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 12:37 AM

I've learned VB. NET for a year in school (they never teach you enough in school :thumbsup: ) But according to what i've been reading in this forum. It seems like people are in favor of C++ and Java rather than in VB.Net
Actually, I want to learn either C++ or Java. Which one should I learn?
Should I completely forget (I mean to care no more) about VB. NET once I start with either C++ or Java?
I am intend to be a programmer but I am interested in games too.
By the way, what do you need to become a game developer? I know you definitely got to know programming language. But what else do you need?
"When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth" - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

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#2 groovicus

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 08:20 AM

The programming language one chooses to use is not that important. If you know core programming concepts, it is trivial to learn other languages.

It seems like people are in favor of C++ and Java

That is because those are two languages that are widely used, but so is C#, Cobol, and any other of a number of languages. Different languages have different purposes.

If you want to be a game developer, all you need to do is develop a game, any game. A game where you guess whether a coin flip is going to be heads or tails is a game. If you want to work for a company that develops games, then you might want to look at these:
http://channel8.msdn.com/Posts/Getting-a-J...izzard-Edition/
http://channel8.msdn.com/Posts/Getting-a-j...Part-1-of-1618/
http://channel8.msdn.com/Posts/Getting-a-G...-Table-Edition/

they never teach you enough in school

Gosh, I have learned more in school than I could ever hope to utilize. Perhaps you need to be more involved in school? :thumbsup:

#3 jpshortstuff

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 09:00 AM

To add to the school comment:

You aren't supposed to learn everything you need to know in school. You are given a push in the right direction along with the option to engage and discuss what you are trying to learn with teachers and students. You should then have 'learnt' enough to 'teach' yourself everything else you need.

I agree, I didn't learn all the languages, syntaxes and concepts in school, but I learnt a bit of the first language and the first few concepts there, and then was expected to go off on my own and build on this.

Conclusion: Use school as a stepping stone/building block to wherever you want to go :thumbsup:

To iterate what groovicus said, the concepts are indeed more important that the language. However, if you are looking for a language to use while practising these concepts, then I would say perhaps look at Java first. You will not be able to cover all the concepts of Computer Programming in just Java though, so once you've got the basics done, begin branching out. Just my personal opinion.

Edited by jpshortstuff, 18 June 2008 - 09:00 AM.

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#4 phale

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 11:27 AM

If you want to be a game developer, all you need to do is develop a game, any game. A game where you guess whether a coin flip is going to be heads or tails is a game.


Thanks for your opinion. Actually, in class, I made the Tic-Tac-Toe game, the Connect 4 game. Moreover, for the final project (we had to make a game instead of taking a test) I made the sudoku game. Of course all were written in VB. Net. I know they all were not complicated (I know some would say they are easy, but anyway I am not them :flowers: )
Honestly, I took me a whole day sitting in front of my computer to just figure out how to make the computer generate numbers for sudoku that obey the sudoku rule. So I guess I need to practice more, right? Or, I wonder if there is anyway better way to improve your coding skill? :thumbsup:

Conclusion: Use school as a stepping stone/building block to wherever you want to go


You're absolutely right! Learning beyond schools' territories is like going out to eat. :trumpet:
"When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth" - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

#5 groovicus

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 12:42 PM

The best way to improve your coding is to write code. There are tons of programming exercises available on the net, specially if you look for problems used in programming contests.




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