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Do It Technicians Use Hjt?


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#1 david28

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 06:51 AM

I was just wondering if the IT professionals at computer repair stores use HJT for a malware removal solution? I did actually happen to ask while buying a router and they guy said that he just scans for viruses and if none come up it's clean! I didn't want to argue but I had to tell him - just because it "shows up with nothing malicious" doesn't mean it's clean. He said that I was wrong so I bought the router and left (never to return :thumbsup: )

Anyway, that's besides the point :flowers:

Is there any members here who own or work at an IT store and use HJT?

Really interested :trumpet:

Thanks,
David.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 10:51 AM

Some self-employed computer repair techs use HJT on their own and some will post client's logs on forums like BC to take advantage of expert analysis. Even if they do use HJT on client machines in their shops, there is no way to know if they have had specific training in using the tool. There is a big difference between an IT Tech who builds systems, installs hardware, makes repairs, etc and those who specialize in malware removal.

If he said you were wrong in the statement you made to him, then he's probably not someone I would recommend for malware removal issues.
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#3 raw

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 10:46 PM

I have found that most shops will not take the time to actually "clean" a computer and as
you said if the Antivirus doesn't fix it they will just recommend a reformat. Pretty hard to find
techs who have in depth malware removal experience. I get a lot of business from people
who have had run ins with the squad of "Geeks".

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#4 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 11:07 PM

Hello, david28

I do work at a Small Business fixing computers in my area (located here) (I am the only employee, the business is run by the owner and his wife)

At my employer, we generally recommend reformat/reinstalls. Why? Our clients pay us by the hour ($66 at the time of this writing, I get approx $7.50 of that), and most don't want to pay for the time required for a five or six hour malware removal. In addition, we often have clients who use software we've never heard of, or off the wall strange programs. When we remove the malware, the machine that's left often has problems with some applications, simply because many types of malware damage the system.

Although, I have to say I do use DSS more often than HJT :D

So I guess you can add me to your tally 8-)

Billy3

Edited by Billy O'Neal, 17 June 2008 - 11:08 PM.

Twitter - My statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation, and are my own personal opinion. (But you already knew that, right?)
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#5 david28

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 01:31 AM

If he said you were wrong in the statement you made to him, then he's probably not someone I would recommend for malware removal issues.


I agree :thumbsup:

Well yeah I see what your trying to say Billy and I agree with it - reformat probably is the bets thing to do.

So I guess that there is a chance that I could get a job at an IT technical store if I know HJT?

Thanks for the replies :flowers:

#6 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 02:51 AM

Hello, david28.

Disclaimer -- most of this is my personal opinion.

So I guess that there is a chance that I could get a job at an IT technical store if I know HJT?

Yes, but keep in mind, most business owners are not interested in cleaning a machine if it takes more than an hour or two. It's too easy to just format the thing.

Chances (from my experience) largely depend on your age (my primary barrier is that I'm a minor), prior employment experience, and expertise in other fields, like hardware. Remember that at a repair shop, 75% of the work you do is hardware related -- diagnosing a failed system, replacing parts -- that sort of thing. If you cant take a system apart and put it back together (all the way, I mean motherboard out of the case and all), then that's a skill that would be good to have before going into such a field (READ: Do you know how to use a screwdriver? :trumpet:). It's not difficult. Every connection is color coded and keyed. You can't put something in the wrong way, you cant put something in the wrong plug 99% of the time (At least since we threw out the AT standard). Play around on your own system if you don't believe me, or see if you can get ahold of a junked machine that no longer operates so you can practice dealing with the pieces if you've never worked inside a PC case.

Prepare to deal with a LOT of dust :thumbsup:

If you know what you're doing, the hardest part is getting your foot in the door. For that, your best tool is a resumé. Print it on bond paper with a laser printer if possible, if not at least use good paper and "High Quality Mode" on your inkjet. IT Shops want to see a professional image. Geeky-ness around the edges is okay, but when needed, you have to deal with clients and other businesses, and professionalism will go a long way toward getting you in such a position. Dress dressy. Even if you don't anticipate this attire for day to day operations, wear a suit if you have one. At least shirt and tie. It all plays into the professional image. Once you have secured the position, you still don't want to be wearing "I'm with Stupid" tee shirts, but you can dress more casually. Copy typical attire of other co-workers (if present) or your boss (if no co-workers).

I think most of this applies (no pun intended :inlove: ) to all job hunts, but I mention it just in case.

Finally, apply to lots of places! Make say -- 5 copies of your resumé, and go to more than one place. You may get lucky with your first shot, but you obviously have a higher chance of success. The yellow pages are the best place to start for potential employers in this business, at least for me :)

Oh, and one more thing -- Don't go to work for GeekSquad or I'm going to have to kill you :flowers:

Hope that helps,
Billy3
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#7 tswsl1989

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 02:58 AM

I'm an IT tech at a school, so priority is normally to get a machine back in service ASAP, so the desktop machines get reimaged, but our security's pretty good, so malware doesn't tend to be an issue.

Staff laptops are less secure (they all get local admin access, not my decision or the IT manager's :grr:), so occasionally the get checked with HJT if there's a lot of data stored locally.

For privaate work, I tend to take a HJT snapshot, even if I'm doing a reformat, so that I can work out what's going on in them a bit more. I'm not an expert with HJT logs, but I'm learning :thumbsup:
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#8 david28

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 03:12 AM

Play around on your own system if you don't believe me, or see if you can get a hold of a junked machine that no longer operates so you can practice dealing with the pieces if you've never worked inside a PC case.


I actually have an old system which I got from a friend - its a PC i use to "experiment" with - I infect it with malware and remove it with HJT I do all sorts of crazy things with it all to learn :thumbsup:

HJT is quite a useful tool but I don't think it is the time factor that is why some IT techs don't use it - I think it is because they don't know it!




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