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Tried Most Components But Still My Pc Is Failing To Boot


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#1 acoustic5679

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 11:41 AM

My build was done last year...

OCZ GameXStream OCZ600GXSSLI 600W ATX12V Power Supply

EVGA 320-P2-N811-AR GeForce 8800 GTS 320MB 320-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card


GIGABYTE GA-965P-S3 LGA 775 Intel P965 Express ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail

Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 Allendale 1.8GHz LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor Model BX80557E4300

Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD2500KS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive

Patriot Extreme Performance 4GB (4 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop

I first starting having problems my not power up. I turn it off from the switch on the PS and try turingit on again and it would take a couple times before it would boot up and turn on. then after a week of that it finally wouldn't boot up at all. It seemed that the PS was only powering the fans, so I bought a new PS to test it out. Unfortunatley I live in a small area and the only store was a radio shack that had a 2 power supplies, but didn't have one that had a PCI-E plug to test out my GTS video card. I bought it anyway thinking I could use my friends video card that does not need an additional plug in from the PS. I got my computer up and running with my buds video card and the new pwoer supply, but I was getting a long beep from the mobo which in the past has been a memory problem for me(my mobo is very finicky about how the sticks are installed) I took 2 of the 4 sticks and it booted up fine so it seemed to be a problem with the actual slots which were the two together closest to the edge of the mobo. Now my computer is not booting at all no matter which slots I have and its not giving me any beeps.

I have ruled out the following...

Memory - all sticks worked fine in another computer

Harddrives - same as above

Power supply (old one) - obviously doesn't work because it will not power up my hardives or video card, but the newer (test) PS does power the harddrives. too bad because I actually spent more purposly on that component when I did my build...

Video card - I can't rule it out because I have no PS available that has PCI-E plugs. My computer is not working with my friends working video card so I do not suspect my 8800 gts is dead.

This leaves the Mobo or the processor and the Power supply. Can anyone suggest anything else? If I buy a new mobo can I just plug in my system drive and all my original componets that work and not have to reinstall everything?

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#2 Nyctor

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 11:58 AM

If you have unplugged everything excluding processor, motherboard and PSU, and it sill does not boot I would suspect the Motherboard.
If you get the exact same model of the Motherboard you should be able to plug it in and it will start right up.

#3 hamluis

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 12:11 PM

FWIW: When I turn off my power supply (using the switch on it), it has the effect of dumping my BIOS/CMOS settings and I have to go back in and reset the clock (and whatever nondefault settings I had).

I suggest that you not do this turning off of the PS, leave the on/off switch on the PS always in the ON position. Use the system case power button to power the system up & down (if XP doesn't power it off).

I would try this: Short the CMOS jumper (or remove the CMOS battery for a few seconds) to set the BIOS to default. Check all connections to/from motherboard, blow out any dust that needs it.

Short The CMOS Jumper - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/207507-28-help-reset-bios

With the power cord to the system unplugged...hold the system power button in for about 15 seconds, then release it.

Reconnect power. Attempt to start system normally (pressing computer power button).

You might take a look at this: http://support.gateway.com/s/Checklists/BP...007050376.shtml

Louis

It probably would not hurt to replace your CMOS battery, IMO.

Edited by hamluis, 05 June 2008 - 12:13 PM.


#4 acoustic5679

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 09:34 AM

So I got my power supply back. That was part of the problem, but my BIOS is still not powering up. At least the new power supply is powering all components now. The old one was obviously broken because my fan on the video carrd wasn't even turning. Now everything seems to be powering on, but BIOS still will not load and no signal from the monitor. I tried taking the battery out of the mobo and putting it back in after a minute, but still no luck. Is taking the battery out the same as reseting the CMOS? because I have a CMOS reset thing on my mobo, but I do not know how to short it.

#5 dc3

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 10:15 AM

Caution: There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any charges your body may have stored before touching any of the components inside. For this procedure you must turn off the computer, we suggest that you unplug it from the wall outlet as well.

Removing the CMOS battery is one of the two ways to clear the CMOS settings. The other way is to use the jumper, you have mentioned seeing these, so you know where this is located. There are three pins in this location, the jumper in the normal position will cover the middle pin and one of the end pins leaving one of the other pins bare. To clear the CMOS you need to move the jumper so that is covers the middle pin and the other bare pin, this must be done with the power off. After a couple of second you will replace the jumper to the original position.

Try using a bootable CD like you XP installation disc and see if the computer boots from it. You may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so that the CD-ROM is the first device in the boot order. If it is able to boot from the CD this will point toward the problem either being the OS or the hdd.

Hamluis, If your settings in the BIOS are lost when you turn off the PSU by its on/off switch this indicative of a bad CMOS battery. The battery should save those setting when the power is turned off.

Edited by dc3, 25 June 2008 - 08:45 PM.

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#6 hamluis

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 07:30 PM

Thanks, dc3..I'll replace it this weekend :thumbsup:.

Louis




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