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Thermal Analysis


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#1 sweeney.172

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 04:53 PM

I know there is software out there to monitor the temperatures of the internals (processor, mobo, etc.). Where do I get this software from? How do I find out what these temperatures are supposed to be? I have an Acer Ferrari 4000 series laptop with a 2.19 GHz processor (I'm not really sure what information is needed to give me an answer).

If I do figure out that my computer is running too hot, how do I diagnose why? Is it true that this is dust 99% of the time? Thanks all.

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#2 garmanma

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 05:38 PM

Speedfan I don't know how much faith I put in programs like these. This is one of the more popular ones. Have you used a can of compressed air and blown out the heat vents?
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#3 dc3

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 09:58 PM

I know there is software out there to monitor the temperatures of the internals (processor, mobo, etc.). Where do I get this software from? How do I find out what these temperatures are supposed to be? I have an Acer Ferrari 4000 series laptop with a 2.19 GHz processor (I'm not really sure what information is needed to give me an answer).

If I do figure out that my computer is running too hot, how do I diagnose why? Is it true that this is dust 99% of the time? Thanks all.



Yes, dust, especially in the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU can cause over heating. If you do clean out the inside of the case make sure that you discharge any electrostatic charges of your body by touching the metal of the case before you handle any of the components inside. Also make sure that the areas where air is drawn in are free of obstructions.

I like to use Everest Home Edition, it mirrors the temperatures in your BIOS which is about as accurate as you're going to get. It also monitors the voltages which checked out by comparison to my DMM.

Edited by dc3, 31 May 2008 - 10:01 PM.

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#4 sweeney.172

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Posted 01 June 2008 - 12:16 AM

"Speedfan I don't know how much faith I put in programs like these. This is one of the more popular ones. Have you used a can of compressed air and blown out the heat vents?"

Yes I tried to blow out the vents but it doesn't seem to work. A lot of dust comes out but the temperature seems to stay the same. Thanks for the replies.

Do you know what these temperatures are supposed to be?

#5 dc3

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Posted 01 June 2008 - 01:24 AM

http://www.amdboard.com/ferrari_4000.html

Environment Temperature:
Operating: 5 C to 35 C
Non-operating: -20 C to 65 C
- Humidity (non-condensing):
Operating: 20% to 80%
Non-operating: 20% to 80%

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#6 labslave28

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 11:11 AM

Are you currently using AMD's Cool and Quiet Drivers? If so and your CPU still runs hot, consider using RightMark CPU clock utility from cpu.rightmark.org. Follow the instructions found in this article "AMD Cool & Quiet-how to do it right" from winhelp.com/rmclock.htm. My HP ZV 5000z was constantly running hot until I switched to the RightMark utility. Also, if you can access and remove the heatsink, blow compressed air outward through the fins. Clean the existing heat sink compound off of the top of the cpu and the bottom of the heatsink with acetone on a cloth. Use Artic Silver heat sink compound from Radio Shack to replace what you've cleaned off. You will get much better performance from the Artic Silver than the factory heat sink compound.




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