Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Introduction To Dynamic Web Development


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 groovicus

groovicus

  • Security Colleague
  • 9,963 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centerville, SD
  • Local time:05:20 AM

Posted 25 May 2008 - 01:12 PM

When it comes to website design, people are no longer content to just put together some static web-pages. Users have become so sophisticated that they quickly become bored, unless the content of the website is new and fresh every time they view the page. Unfortunately, this leads many aspiring web-developers to run before they can crawl.

In the spirit of trying to develop an understanding of how web sites work, we need to start with looking at the difference between dynamic and static web pages. Even though the difference seems obvious, young developers have never had the opportunity to learn the difference, so here goes. A static webpage is one that delivers the same content, every time the page is loaded, for every person that wants to view the page. The only way to change the content is to edit the HTML. Here is a sample of a static web page:
<html>
   <head>
	  <title></title>
   </head>
   <body>
	  <p>Hello World.</p>
   </body>
</html>

No matter who views the page, all it is ever going to is deliver the message "Hello World".

An good example of a dynamic web page is MSNBC. Nearly every time someone views the page, the news has been updated, and news stories are rotated in and out. If one chooses, they can also personalize the web page so that local news is also included. The code behind a page like that is too complex to include here, but can easily be viewed in the browser of your choice. The visible code is only part of the picture there. With dynamic pages, there is a ton more happening more happening than is readily apparent.

Now that we have a grasp of the difference between dynamic and static content, we can look at how dynamic content is generated. First we break it down into client side code, and server side code. Simply put, the client side code is the code that is delivered to your browser, and can consist of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Server side code is everything else. This is the part that people have trouble understanding, so let's look at what happens when one requests a web page.

When the client makes a request for a web page, the request is sent out into the world, and eventually the request makes it to the correct server. The server gets the request, and the server sends the page back to the client. In the case of a static page, the content is simply sent back to the client. In the case where dynamic web content is being generated, then the picture is a bit different. Take, for example, when you click on a link at a forum. the request goes out to the server, along with some bit of information that tells the server which link was clicked. Once the request gets to the server, the server directs the request to the controller. The controller is an application, or set of applications, that determine the content that is to be returned to the client. In this example, the controller gets handed the request. The controller knows that, for instance, the user clicked on the link for the section of the forum that deals with programming questions. the controller then knows it needs to access the database and get the content that relates to the programming section. From there, the content gets handed to helper applications that assemble and format the code into HTML, which is then passed back to the controller. The controller then passes it back to the client that requested it. Here is a picture that roughly shows the process.



Posted Image




*******************

Now with a bit of understanding about how dynamic web pages are created, we can turn to how to actually develop dynamic content, and this is another place where people get a bit confused. First of all, developing dynamic content means learning more than just HTML, CSS, and/or Javascript. The three technologies just mentioned are client-side languages, meaning that the only thing they can really do is generate web pages, although with Javascipt and AJAX, one could simulate dynamic content, but that is limited in application.

What that means is that in order to develop dynamic content, one either needs to learn an actual programming language, or learn to use a content management system like Joomla. The programming language one chooses is largely irrelevant, whether it be Java, PHP, C#, Perl, or any other number of languages. In order to store a large amount of content, one will also need to know how to use a database, or at a minimum, store data as text files of some sort.

There is no way possible to write a guide that can show how to develop dynamic web content since there are so many aspects involved, and each aspect alone is too much to understand in one lesson. The purpose of this introduction is only to give an overview of the skills needed, and a basic understanding of dynamic page generation.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 sasuke0315

sasuke0315

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:manila, Phillipines
  • Local time:06:20 AM

Posted 10 November 2008 - 03:57 AM

I'd learned a lot!!! :thumbsup: :flowers:

#3 Aanders5

Aanders5

  • Members
  • 53 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA, MI
  • Local time:07:20 AM

Posted 10 November 2008 - 10:43 PM

Hehe, nice. Like 2 days ago our programmer explained this whole dealio to me. I'm trying to MOD wireshark to act as a ROOT IP catcher to stop certain banned members from entering our forums. Seeing how the forum is hosted on a free host, their server auto-masks the IP, and the offender uses a proxy, so we need to keep blocking his regenerating IP masks. :thumbsup:

#4 Techyguy

Techyguy

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 11 January 2010 - 03:52 PM

Hi, The information provided is definitely the best introduction to any newbie. I would like to learn joomla to create a dynamic web page. Can you guys suggest me the best place or link to learn this software and also any information about the prerequisites is appreciated. Thank you in advance.

#5 groovicus

groovicus
  • Topic Starter

  • Security Colleague
  • 9,963 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centerville, SD
  • Local time:05:20 AM

Posted 11 January 2010 - 05:56 PM

The Joomla website has all of the documentation that you need, as well as the requirements.

#6 Techyguy

Techyguy

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 12 January 2010 - 01:55 PM

Thank you groovicus. :thumbsup:

#7 webdev_jo

webdev_jo

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:20 AM

Posted 13 April 2010 - 09:26 AM

The Joomla website has all of the documentation that you need, as well as the requirements.


that's right I've heard from a friend also that information about Joomla are just easy to find... :thumbsup:

#8 troublesh00ter

troublesh00ter

  • Members
  • 561 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Deep South
  • Local time:06:20 AM

Posted 18 October 2010 - 08:27 AM

I'm trying to learn the new standard XHTML and CSS.

I'm kinda playin around with JavaScript a little too.

I think web development is so cool.

I get really frustrated when something won't work though.

Sometimes it takes hours just to notice a tiny mistake!
for3ver,
goose90proof

#9 KamakaZ

KamakaZ

  • Members
  • 739 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Victoria
  • Local time:10:20 PM

Posted 12 July 2012 - 11:27 PM

I get really frustrated when something won't work though.

Sometimes it takes hours just to notice a tiny mistake!


Handy tip : use a code editor with syntax highlighting, can make finding potential problems a lot easier.

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#10 SusanWhite

SusanWhite

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 01 January 2014 - 02:59 AM

A very informative post. We can also use AJAX for creating the dynamic page like facebook without refreshing the page. Just trigger the ajax at equal intervals which will fetch the latest data and add into the page using Javascript.



#11 pistol22cal

pistol22cal

  • Members
  • 290 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:06:20 AM

Posted 02 September 2015 - 09:42 PM

I'm trying to learn the new standard XHTML and CSS.

I'm kinda playin around with JavaScript a little too.

I think web development is so cool.

I get really frustrated when something won't work though.

Sometimes it takes hours just to notice a tiny mistake!

 

Or Days Or Weeks Or Months

 

Validation tools are so useful! Cant recommend them enough.

 

http://www.w3.org/People/Raggett/tidy/


I Love Lamp!


#12 snehacapoor

snehacapoor

  • Members
  • 16 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 10 August 2016 - 08:26 AM

Dynamic web development is now a priority than static web development. So, thanks for providing such a nice information about dynamic web development. 



#13 YojimboSan

YojimboSan

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:20 AM

Posted 29 August 2017 - 08:46 AM

Surprised no one has mentioned React. All client side but you can pull dynamic content from a DB via node or whatever.

 

Lots of great tutorials out there too. Wes Bos and Udacity's being two of my favorites right now, but there are a ton of free tutorials out there too, no need to pay anything.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users