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Best Way To Back Up Data


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#1 Rougehott

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 11:47 AM

Hey There,

I've been putting off backing up my hard/drive data which I know is BAD, BAD, BAD, BAD! I've been putting it off because I'm not sure what the best route of back up is. In my ideal world, what I want:

1) To plug in an external drive (or something) to my current computer and press a button and have all my files download to the new drive for back up.
2) Additionally, when new files are added to my computer, I want to do an incremental back-up of only those new files to my new drive (so in the end, the new drive will be a comprhensive back up of when I initially backed up data and when I added new data at a later date.

Someone mentioned to me that I just get an external hard drive, put all files I want to save in the "My Documents Folder" and then just drag and drop the whole folder to the new drive. That seems like a good idea for the initial back up.. but what about the in the future. If I drag and Drop the whole folder (again) I'll get a message for 100's of files asking if I"m sure I want to replace the existing folder. Is there a program that can proc compare one drive against the other and only transfer the differences?

Please let me know, and if you can provide SPECIFICS as to what brand what device I should get I would appreciate it. I wanted to try and get this squared away today!

Thanks,

Lauren

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 12:24 PM

Any way that is routine...is the best way, IMO :thumbsup:.

I don't believe in incremental backups, preferring to do disk images periodically...but I only do routine things on my system and none of that warrants incremental strategies, IMO.

There are programs available that seem to do what you desire...but I'm not familiar with using any of them.

Louis

#3 Rougehott

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 12:57 PM

What do you recommend? I need specifics :thumbsup: I'm want to back up standard files, music, photos, word docs. What is the best way :huh: Please reply quick, I wanted to do this today :huh:

L

P.S. What is involved in a DISC Image? What should I tell the computer store I need? B)

Edited by Rougehott, 17 May 2008 - 12:58 PM.


#4 BungleFeet

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 04:35 PM

For a set-and-forget backup solution, I would recommend Carbonite Online Backup (http://www.carbonite.com/). This works by backing up you data to Carbonite's data enter over your broadband internet connection. Your data is encrypted before it is backed up, so no-one but you can read it.

The advantage of online backup is that your backup is stored in a physically remote location from your original data. That way, you can get your data back even after some distaster such as fire or flood. Also, once the software is running it is constantly updating your backup, so you don't even have to remember to make routin backups.

The disadvantage is that the initial backup will take some time to complete (1 - 2 weeks, depending on the speed of your connection and the amount of data you have). This means it is not really feasible if you need to back up more than, say, 60GB of data.

You pay a yearly subsription for the service (about $50) for unlimited backup.

I have been using this service for a gew months now, and am very happy with it - no more backup worries for me!

Cheers,

BungleFeet

#5 Klinkaroo

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 10:56 PM

Also you can get external hard drives that have a one-touch button, when you feel like backing up just press it. The software automatically checks to see what is new and backs up only what is new.

Can get them at Staples, Future Shop that king of place.


Just a quick little thing, my backup is done on a external hard drive like this beside my computer for most files, but extremely important stuff (photos that are irreplaceable) are stored on another small hard drive and put into a Safe Deposit Box at my bank. (BTW Safe deposit boxes are about 50 bucks a year...)

Edited by Klinkaroo, 17 May 2008 - 10:58 PM.


#6 Rougehott

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Posted 18 May 2008 - 01:36 AM

Hey,

Thanks for the info. Can you recommend a 1 button backup system/drive? What should I ask for at Staples? Not a bad idea with the safe deposit box :thumbsup: Let me first worry about making a copy :huh:

L

#7 hamluis

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Posted 18 May 2008 - 08:05 AM

There are various types of disk-imaging software.

Two of the most popular/reliable are Symantec's Ghost and Acronis True Image.

I use Powerquest Drive Image 2002...which is one of the main precursors of today's Symantec Ghost. The firm that made PDI 2002 was bought by Symantec several years ago and they eliminated the competition (for their own Ghost product) and incorporated various features from both to produce one product.

I do a number of things online, but I think that I would prefer to have my backups available at any time...rather than be dependent on Internet access and a possible delayed access to backups. Just my perspective on that :thumbsup:.

Louis

#8 Klinkaroo

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Posted 18 May 2008 - 10:29 AM

Well one example is :
http://www.staples.ca/ENG/Catalog/cat_sku....;affixedcode=WW

When you go to the store just ask a sales associate for a push-button backup hard drive. If he knows his stuff a bit he should be able to point you in the right direction.

Klink

#9 Rougehott

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Posted 18 May 2008 - 09:20 PM

Thank you ALL for all the great info!!!




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