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What's It Like?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 ill_Nino

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 07:32 PM

I was wondering what Linux is like, the advantages & disadvantages. Whether it is worth running? And what is the main requirements of running a good version of Linux.

A screenshot would also be nice to see what it looks like. And how would I go about dual operating systems.

Thanks

~ Nino

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#2 madman6510

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 11:00 PM

Linux is an operating system, like Windows or OSX. The main difference between Linux and Windows/OSX is that Linux is Open Source, or that anyone can look at it's code, and make changes if they want to/read the developer comments :thumbsup:

Pros:
1. Linux is free (as in speech).
2. Linux is (usually) free (as in beer).
3. The community support for Linux is excellent.
4. Linux is VERY stable.
5. Linux is immune from 99.9999999999999% of viruses. (Last time I checked, there were 4. And all required you to do something very complicated and intentional to install.)
6. Linux is very customizable.
7. There are many different modern distributions of Linux. (Instead of there being only one current version, as with Windows).
8. Most Linux distributions are designed to be usable out of the box (office suite, photo editing software, media players, email clients, web browsers, etc).
9. Linux has a thing called repositories, and you can use a program called Synaptic to install pretty much anything you want off of the internet (instead of having to browse the internet, download the files, install the files, update, etc.)
10. Linux has a centralized updating system, meaning that you use one program to update ALL of your software.
11. Linux can run on very fast computers, and very slow computers. (I got it working on a 386.)
12. Linux has a program called WINE that lets you run some Windows programs. There are also different programs (like Cedega) that are specifically for games.
13. Linux is scientifically proven to up your cool factor. :flowers:

Cons:
1. Most commercial software was not written for Linux, so it will not work unless you use an emulator.
2. Driver support for proprietary products isn't that good (but it's getting better).
3. Commercial support costs moneys. Lots and lots of moneys.
4. You usually can't buy computers with Linux preinstalled. (Dell has some for sale, and a lot of micro-laptops are also coming out with Linux on them.)
5. Linux requires you to use the terminal some. It's not that hard though.
6. Linux has a UNIX-like filesystem (like OSX) that starts with root (/), and everything bases from there, instead of using drive letters (C:). This is confusing for some newbies. You get used to it after a bit though.

The main requirements vary with Linux, from stripped down text versions that run on almost nothing, to uber-shiny fancy ones that will make your computer blow up if it isn't brand spanking new.

All Linux distributions look different. Some look like Windows. Some look like DOS. Some make you think "WTH were the programmers smoking when they designed this". And some look like something of their own. It's extremely diverse.

The one I use is Ubuntu. It's easy to use and looks nice.

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A dual boot is pretty easy. You just have to tell the installer to shrink the Windows partition (or, if you're feeling cocky, you can manually partition it out), and the installer does the rest.

#3 El_Tel

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 02:48 AM

The one I use is Ubuntu. It's easy to use and looks nice.

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A dual boot is pretty easy. You just have to tell the installer to shrink the Windows partition (or, if you're feeling cocky, you can manually partition it out), and the installer does the rest.

Hi...
What would be the best partition size required for duel booting, or will Ubuntu choose this from what it finds available on your PC ?
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Tarrah then... Why not check my Intro

Many Thanks for taking the time out of your busy day...

#4 ill_Nino

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 05:37 AM

Would 172GB be fine?

#5 Joedude

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 11:38 AM

More than enough
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#6 Specmon

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 04:35 PM

When setting up your partitions, you use "Custom Partitioning" instead of letting the installer just run. That's because you have a Windows installation on C and maybe a D and E drives for windows that you don't want overwritten.

In the custom partition tools in distros like Ubuntu, PCLos, Mandriva One, probably just about all of them, you get to clearly see your windows partitions, can manipulate them (make smaller) then create your Linux partitions.

You basically need three partitions. Root, (designated as "/") which is kinda like your Windows "C" drive, in that this is where your system files get put. Then you need a "swap" file, doesn't need formated, just created, and its size should be twice the amount of RAM your system has.

Then you need a /"home" partition that is where you put all your personal stuff, the OS itself will also put your user files there too. Set up your "/" (Root) and "/home" partitions as ext3 until you learn enough to decide that you want something other than that.

Most people that get into this like to try a few or more "distros" to see which they like better and things like that. If you get into doing that you only need the one swap and one"/home" partitions, they will work for how ever many distros you have installed at one time. This is another reason to learn how to use custom partitioning, because when you install new distros, you don't create new swap and /home partitions. You especially would want to be careful that a gung-ho installer didn't overwrite your /home partition and all the important files you've already stored there.

So as far as size goes, if you have a 176 or so gigs laying fallow, you could give your root partition as little as 4 gigs, maybe go to 10, probably not going to need more, plus that gives you room to install a few more distros. Your /home partition will get the most workout, is where anything you download, for example, and all files you create will go. So with tons of space and whether or not you intend to play with multiple distros, a good chunk, say 30-40 gigs is ample without being wasteful.

Another thing to remember is that most new distros, (I'm pretty sure this includes Ubuntu) can now read and write to Windows' NTFS file systems, read/writing to FAT32 has been common for a few years, so with Linux, you'll be able to see and use your entire hard drive.

You should find all this to be pretty straight forward, and after doing it, you'll wonder what all the fuss was about.

Linux looks pretty cool too. Has really moved up in the "class" area in the last couple years. I'll bet you find Ubuntu easier to use, and certainly more stable than Vista. If you are into "eye candy" Linux does a real nice job, and, if you have the power, some people think better than Vista.

One of my favorite "likes" about Linux and open source software, is that its all free! And there isn't too much, outside of proprietary business apps, for which someone hasn't written a good and constantly improving application.

Enjoy.

Tom :thumbsup:

Edited by jgweed, 21 April 2008 - 06:38 PM.
Edited at poster's request. jgw

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