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Cloning Laptop Hdd


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#1 goofed up

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 11:06 AM

My motherboard went bad on my Asus 7100vp so I found a different one on craigslist. I swapped the hard drive, but the new one came with a seagate 7200 160gb, my old one is a seagate 5400 100gb, so I'd like to swap them. I really don't want to start over software wise--so I've been looking into different ways to clone the hdd. Seems that there are usb boxes that will house the new drive and then I just dump the contents from the old one, then switch them, and use the old drive as a back up. The new seagate connects to the to the motherboard through slots, the old one through pins. I don't have any computer shops around here, so I'm looking for advice, where to buy one and what to buy that will work with both drives. I also have a firewire port, but anything will do.

new drive: seagate momentus 7200 160gb
old drive: seagate momentus 5400 100gb
They are laptop drives

Thanks

Edited by goofed up, 03 April 2008 - 11:08 AM.


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#2 usasma

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 01:13 PM

Probably the easiest thing to do would be to install Windows on the new drive while it's in the computer by using the restore disks for the system. Once that's done, you can get a USB hard drive caddy fairly cheaply and use it to transfer your data.

You can "clone" your old hard drive to the new one - but then installing it on the new one will give you fits while trying to get it to work. Windows will try to load the old drivers and hardware when it boots - and will encounter errors while doing it. Sometimes you can fix it by doing a repair install before booting up - but that doesn't always work.
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#3 goofed up

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 01:46 PM

I think I understand what you're saying. If I were to take the hard drive to a different system-all the drivers would conflict with the hardware and cause havoc probably making it not work at all. I'm only trying to change the hard drive, all the hardware is essentially the same. I thought it would easy, just format the usb disk, copy the contents from my current hd to the usb one, then switch hard drives, is it not that simple?

#4 usasma

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:27 PM

Each piece of hardware is assigned several "identifiers" by Windows - one of which is the SID (Security ID). When you change this, Windows gets upset.

Now, you're putting your old OS onto another hard drive which is a different speed, a different size, and uses a different method of hooking up to the motherboard. That alone is a problem - but there's a link to cover it here: http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/moving_xp.html

Now, since the new drive connects with slots rather than pins, this change has likely been made to the motherboard - along with the necessary changes to the controllers that run things like this on the motherboard..

I'm not telling you that you can't do this - what I'm saying is that it's going to be more expensive, more difficult, and it still may not even work. I have done this several times - and it only worked for me if I was using similar components - and I can't tell how similar the components are in your new motherboard (with the exception of the hard drive connectors).

If you wish to do it, you'll first have to invest in a drive caddy capable of handling both hard drives - this is because you'll have to do the cloning the drive on a working system. This is possible using you laptop, but only if you can boot from a cloning CD, that the cloning program will recognize your hard drive, and that you've hooked up both drives to the laptop at the same time.

If you've got access to another computer, you can clone the drive to a file on the other computer - then switch the drives and clone the file on the computer to the new hard drive.

I've had good luck with these adapters: http://cooldrives.stores.yahoo.net/usbadapters.html
You'll also need cloning software. I use a commercial program for this called Acronis True Image. It's about $50 US and is available here: http://www.acronis.com FWIW - there are other programs available that others prefer - there are even some free one's out there. But, as I have no knowledge of their use/reliability, I can't comment on them.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#5 JPeterman

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 03:08 PM

Note: this reply pertains just to the part of your question as far as a cloning software. If you are looking to just clone, and you have seagate hard drives, why not use Seagates "DiscWizard", it is their cloning freeware for their hard drives, and is actually a Acronis True Image product. It is found here: http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/d...oads/discwizard.

#6 goofed up

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 03:17 PM

It looks like there are a couple free software solutions. Norton's Ghost will automatically add space the extra space to the hard drive without leaving it as a partition. I'll look @ seagates version.

usasma: Sorry, I think we're still on different pages. The Motherboards are exactly the same. There is an adapter from ASUS which goes from HD to Mobo that is different for the different drives. The old one is ATA the new one SATA (I think). From what I'm reading, it looks like I just encase the new one, clone the old one to the new one and swap them. The only hardware change is the actual HD and shouldn't windows pick that up like any other hardware change?

Edited by goofed up, 03 April 2008 - 03:19 PM.


#7 usasma

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 07:30 PM

Have you verified that all the chips on the motherboard are the same make, model, and version - and that they're all connected in the same way? A major change, such as the type of hard drive, will require changes on the motherboard (the drive controllers in particular) - it's just that you may not be able to see them with the naked eye. I still maintain (based upon my previous experiences) that this is a different motherboard. even though it fits in the same case.

Two identical hard drives are two completely different pieces of hardware in Windows - and Windows must adjust for changes in each of them when it boots. Try opening up Device Manager and expand the System Devices tree - each one of those things is a separate piece of hardware on your motherboard - have you checked each one to ensure that they're the same from your old motherboard to your new one? It's the sheer volume of changed devices that causes the problems with Windows booting.

Now this case in particular is likely to have fewer problems than most transfers like this - because the board is similar to the old board. It's reasonable to assume that Asus minimized the changes that it made to the board when it went from ATA to SATA drives - and the the most significant change is likely to be with the parts of the motherboard that support the hard drive (the controllers).
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#8 goofed up

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 11:29 PM

I think I see what you're saying. You think that I have different mobos in the same case?
Just for arguments sake, lets say that they are the exact same... now will I have problems?

My z71v died last Sunday, so I bought a different one with the thought that I would just plug and play the hd (which is working just fine). When I got the new z71v (since it has a bigger faster hd) I thought about just restarting, installing all the programs, but the copy of windows xp on the new z71v isn't a legal copy (which I think will cause problems with office 07). So, I pulled the hard drive from the new z71v, it is sitting on my desk, and put the hard drive from my old z71v in the new machine, it loaded up exactly like from the old z71v, no new hardware, nothing, just ran like it is supposed to. So, I know that the old drive will work in the new machine with no problems, and I know that the new drive will work in the new machine with no problems; but if the new drive thinks that it is the old drive, only bigger, will that cause problems?
And is there an enclosure that I can use for both, a SATA and a Ultra ATA (I think that's what the seagate momentus 5400rpm 100gb) First to clone the little one onto the big one, then to use the little one as a portable backup?

#9 goofed up

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 11:45 AM

If anyone cares, and I'm sure you don't, but I'll post it anyway. The solution was much simpler than made out to be. Essentially, I just upgraded the hard drive from an Ide 100gb seagate to a Sata 160 gb seagate. Although I switched laptops in the middle of it, they were in fact the same machine, a non factor. So, I bought a dual Ide/Sata USB case from Newegg, downloaded a program from Seagate for free that copied one hard drive onto the other, and swapped disks. When I first started with the new Sata drive, which needs to load drivers during XP installation, I got the blue screen, but I did a system restore and it loaded the drivers. The only issue was that XP started failing the automatic updates, which was fixed by looking up the problem from the windows update site. Now I have the 100gb hd in the case with the old files as a back up and I'll keep all my wifes junk on it. Thanks for all the useful comments.




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