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What Is Idogrpgz.exe? A Virus?


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#1 Tom Tom

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:37 PM

I recently suffered a series of infections. Using a series anti-virus and malware cleaners, I got everythign back working again.

But one item stumped me -- and apparently, the anti-virus software too:

A file named idogrpgz.exe appeared in the C:\Windows\ folder, along with an associated pre-fetch and registry item, on the same day/time the other viruses were created. I tried Googling it. Not a trace.

Though none of the (8) malware/virus cleaners flagged it, it seemed so suspicious that I took a chance and deleted it manually, with no ill effect. Subsequently, Trend Micro tech support also advised me to "fix" the related registry item, using Hijack this.

But what in the world is "idogrpgz.exe"?? has anybody every heard of this thing? Or is it just a random name assigned to a bit of spyware by the trojan that planted it?

Curious,

tom

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:43 PM

I can't find any info on it either so more than likely it was malware with a random name.

Whenever you cannot find any information on a file, the file has a legitimate name but is not located where it is supposed to be, or you want a second opinion, submit it to jotti's virusscan or virustotal.com. In the "File to upload & scan" box, browse to the location of the suspicious file and submit (upload) it for scanning/analysis.
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#3 Tom Tom

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:51 PM

Sounds like good advice. Thanks for the tip.

BTW, in case it helps anybody else, I had good success using a very primitive method for finding a large number of obviously malware *.exe files -- files that all 8 of the anti-malware programs I ran had missed.

Once I identified the exact time that the know infections occurred, I simply searched my hard drive for all files created that day.

Sure enough, about 50 4 kb *.exe files popped up in the Windows folder - all created at the exact same hour/minute/second!

A few clicks, and they were history....

Simple, but effective, in this case.

Tom

#4 quietman7

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:58 PM

Your welcome.

Now you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Start > Run and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok".
  • Click the "More Options" Tab.
  • Click "Clean Up" in the System Restore section to remove all previous restore points except the newly created one.

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