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?s Re: Backup And Restore


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#1 dazedandconfused

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 05:23 PM

I have a new HP desktop, pre-loaded with Vista Home Premium. My current confusion is in the "backup" territory. I've been reading posts here, as well as info on other sites like MS, but just can't seem to feel comfortable enough to press the button. Here's what I've "done" or think I "know" so far:

I have successfully used the Create a Checkpoint, and Restore from a Previous Checkpoint functions when I was trying to clean up the crapola that was shipped with the machine that I didn't want.

I successfully followed the steps under System Maintenance to "Protect your files by backing them up" and it pre-selected the D:\ drive as the destination so I left it at that.

This morning, I decided "gee, I'm about to make changes so I can migrate my old Outlook files, so I probably should do another backup" - so I followed those steps again...only to learn that the D:/drive was full and the backup aborted.

I found a post here from Maverik in response to another user who noted that his "C was small but D was full" which seems like my situation. That reply said:

"This happens cause Vista is saving backup files in recovery partition D.

Go to start and open computer, click Alt key to get the menu on the top. Click on tools and go to folder options. Click on View tab and put a Check mark in Show hidden files. Close that and double click on D Recovery and open it. Usually Vista will save this backup files under the user name adding a -pc "MavericK-pc", or giving just a -pc name to the file, or a folder named Backup. This files are safe to delete, and will liberate the space in the recovery partition of your Compac to make it the size it's supposed to be for it to not give trouble any more.

Close this and click on Start, go to the control panel and on the left side you will see Classic View, click on it and open Backup and Restore Center. click on Backup Files and customize it according to your needs. It's set to backup files in D drive and can easily be changed to another location, like a CDROM or an external Hard drive.

Finally go to Start and click on Computer, click the Alt key to get the menu on the top and click on tools, go to Folders Options and go to the View tab, uncheck show hidden files and then click apply to close it


Prior to finding that post, I had used the options to CleanUp my D:\ space by deleting all but my last Restore Point, and by Compressing the files. Now - my concern is that if I go ahead and follow the steps outlined for the other user, I may be deleting the only thing that has go-back capability for me. On the other hand, I may be off-base - and the Backup and the Restore Point files are saved in different and separate places. Does that make sense? I guess I'm trying to figure out if the two options (or what look like to options to me) are really the same, or are completely seperate. If I delete the Backup folder as noted, will I still be able to restore back to a previous Restore Point if needed, or will I have toasted myself?

Also - just an FYI - I have a Seagate external hard drive that I plan to set up as the destination of a weekly automatic backup, but I'm still cleaning it up from a different XP machine so thought I was doing a good thing by using the default Vista Backup function in the meantime.

Sorry this sounds so confusing. I've revised the post several times, and I just don't know how to 'splain my question/concern any better. Is the "recovery partition" the destination for both "set a restore point" and "perform system backup" functions? Does the same data get backed up regardless of which you choose? Is the resulting data file(s) the same for both functions?

Thanks for your help! :huh:

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#2 ewrlopa

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 11:50 AM

Dazed

If your PC has SD or Compact Flash, windows backup data may be saved on those.

If you backup HDD data to the HDD, your defeating the purpose of backing up.

D

#3 ewrlopa

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 11:52 AM

FYI

System restore backs up the registry hives, backup if for user data!

D

#4 dazedandconfused

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 03:49 PM

Thanks for the reply ewrlopa. I understand the issue about backing up the HDD to the HDD, which is why I made the note about getting my external drive working w/Vista. What I'm trying to find out is if I can/should delete the almost-completely-full D:\ drive which came as a "default recovery drive" on my new Vista machine. I don't know what's backed up there - whether it's from Setting a Restore Point or using the Backup Function built into the O/S or what.

Hope that makes a bit more sense.

#5 Bartster

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 05:22 PM

Dazed:


That is a Recovery Image of your OS and serves as a safety net in case of major system crash.
What it does is restore your system to it's factory shipped condition. If you haven't already done
so, I strongly recommend that you make a set of disks ( best to use 2 DVD-R's )

Here's how to do it:

1. Close all open programs
2. Click Windows Start Button
3. Click All Programs
4. Click PC Help & Tools
5. Click Recovery Disk Creator

Follow the prompts.

I would also recommend leaving the D: partition alone. It can be erased after you burn those disks,
to make more room on your HDD ( about 10 GB ).

The decision to do that is up to you!

Edited by Bartster, 15 March 2008 - 05:58 PM.


#6 dazedandconfused

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 05:57 PM

Thanks Bartster. I have created the restore disks (and even used them once already).

Have I already screwed up my "recovery image" if I've done a backup to it? It used to look like there was a lot of empty space on it - - then, thinking I was being smart and careful - - I did this...

1. Went to Control Panel
2. Went to System Administration
3. Went to Backup and Restore Center
4. Went to Back up your computer
5. Accepted the default destination of D:\

It seemed idiot-proof at the time....but now I'm realizing that I probably shouldn't have done it that way. I've since got my external drive working (it's an oldie and I had to get it working w/Vista), and
don't know whether to leave D:\ alone - - or if I should delete the backup that I put on top of what was already there (if thats even possible) - - or delete everything on it and somehow get just the recovery image back - - or what. As you've already surmised, I'm NOT a techie. I am concerned that I've cut holes in my "safety net" and would gladly welcome any advice on how to straighten it out.

Thanks!

#7 Bartster

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 06:15 PM

Dazed:

If you have used the disks once already without any problems, then I would say you're
in good shape. I'm not a real techie either. I could be mistaken, but I didn't think there
was any way to screw anything up in the D: partition. Any way as long as the disks
work correctly you shouldn't have any worries.

Maybe someone more knowledgable could jump in and give an opinion.

Edited by Bartster, 15 March 2008 - 06:21 PM.





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