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Can I Access A Dos Computer On My Lan


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#1 Martel

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Posted 11 March 2008 - 10:08 PM

Windows media center XP
D-Link DI-514

I have a laptop that will not go into windows.

I can turn it on, go into dos see files.

I want to rescue my documents


The Question:

Can I reach it through my desktop?

I have the mac address

I have been trying to get my laptops Windows running
No luck..
I just want to rescue my files, then I'm gonna nuke the hard drive.
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/134983/laptop-hard-drive-acting-naughty/

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#2 Cyb3r_Ninj@

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 12:03 PM

You can try to use the Command Prompt with Networking Advanced Startup Option on the laptop with the damaged OS by pressing F8 at the BIOS splash screen and selecting Command Prompt with Networking. Then from another machine you can attempt to access the C:\ drive by running the following command from another machine on the same LAN by doing the following:

Start >> Run >> type \\%computername%\c$

%computername% is a placeholder for the actual name of the computer you are trying to access the drive on. If you do not know what the computer name is, you can type the following command in the command prompt to return it:

set computername >> press [Enter]

This may or may not work; i haven't been in a situation where i have had to retrieve files from the command line on a machine which could not boot the OS. There are other means of retrieving data from a laptop hard drive which are at my disposal and are much easier.

If that does not work for you, i would suggest purchasing a USB external notebook hard drive enclosure which will allow you to remove the hard drive from the laptop computer and plug it into a working machine via USB connection. You can then open the drive as if it were any other USB memory device and extract your files through Windows Explorer using the GUI interface on a functioning computer. You can also use this enclosure to wipe and format the hard drive prior to re-installing it back into the laptop. Also, it will give you access to all files in GUI mode so you can take your time and go through the entire file system with a fine tooth comb.

A sample USB external notebook HDD enclosure is here:
http://www.xpcgear.com/ue25u1.html

This is the preferred method that i use to recover files on a laptop which will not boot.

NOTE: You can do the same with a desktop machine that will not boot by removing the HDD and inserting it into a functional desktop tower in the secondary HDD slot and loading it in the slave position. On desktop HDD's there is a jumper (little piece of plastic with conductors inside) which you will need to move to the appropriate slot in order to use the drive as a "slave" for file recovery or just to add a secondary HDD to your tower.

Crude diagram:
[..] Cable Select
.. Master
.. Slave
..

By default, desktop most HDDs will have the jumper in the Cable Select position (indicated by [..]). The ".." represent the two prongs / pins over which the jumper will slide. There are usually 3 or 4 sets of pins which should be labelled accordingly as: Cable Select, Master, Slave. When you are putting a second HDD into your desktop machine, you want to be sure that the jumper is in the Slave position. Your master hard drive can have the jumper in the Cable Select or Master position.
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***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#3 Martel

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 04:03 PM

Cyb3r_Ninj@

Thanks for the in depth response.

The reason I was asking the lan question is I had tried recovering the laptop files using an existing 2.5" enclosure I have and it bogged my desktop computer down.

I tried the F8 but the only thing I get is a black screen displaying A disk read error occurred
Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart

If it is of any help I have the Ultimate Boot CD and it works.

I liked at the link you provided http://www.xpcgear.com/ue25u1.html and noticed that enclosure has software.

Maybe it would help if I had that.




You said there were easier ways and I am all about that...so would you reccomend I order a new enclosure.

Also would I need to use a jumper on the 2.5" drive it has the jumper pin diagram on the case.

Of course I have no jumpers, and I searched at Circuit City, Best Buy and Radio Shak they had no tiny jumpers and told me it was not necessary on a 2.5 " drive
...

Edited by Martel, 14 March 2008 - 04:34 PM.


#4 Cyb3r_Ninj@

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 06:18 PM

Martel:

The jumper and pins are usually only applicable to a desktop computer's internal HDD. I only mentioned this in my previous post because you can follow the same instructions should this ever happen with a desktop computer. Of course, i have not seen any USB external enclosures which will accomodate a desktop internal HDD, but i am sure that there are tools out there which can accomodate this. The paragraph detailing this process was just for informational use that this process can be done for desktop or laptop HDDs.

So in your case, with the laptop HDD, this will not apply; you were advised correctly. Yes there is a jumper pin and diagram that is present on laptop HDDs, but usually the external USB enclosure is configured such that you do not need to mess with the jumper and pin setting. The data transfer is handled through the USB interface.

The external USB enclosures that i have worked with in the past have not required additional software to be installed. Sometimes these devices are picky about which USB port you plug them into; the actual USB cable that you use can also have an effect. I have run into situations in the past where i have plugged in my external enclosure to a USB port and encountered error messages which indicate that there is a power surge on the USB hub. Simply switching to an alternate USB port usually resolves the issue. Also i have run into situations substituting a USB cable can prevent the device from loading, which is strange because the male ends are the same. You can try switching out the USB cable connecting the USB device to your desktop computer. Its probably best to use a shielded cable which is usually in clear plastic coating with an aluminum cladding inside the plastic. With a black plastic coating, you cannot see inside and therefore the cabling may be unshielded and for some reason or another just doesn't conduct the signal as well.

I think that the USB enclosure is the easiest way to extract / recover files from a laptop HDD which will not boot. If your budget allows, it may not be a bad idea to invest in an additional USB enclosure, should one fail, you would always have a backup. The cheapest route will be to try a different cable, then if that still doesn't work, a different USB enclosure might do the trick.

I don't have any experience working with the Ultimate Boot CD, but this may be an alternate way for you to recover your files. It should have a programmable environment similar to Symantec Ghost, where you will be able to access your files.
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Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#5 Martel

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 09:56 PM

Cyb3r_Ninj@:

Again, Thanks your head on approach to my sitution.

I am going to get another enclosure and shielded cable and see how that works.

I had not realized that the cable was any different, but the cable I had been using was for my digital camera.

I will be back after I have tried those things. (hopefully with success)!
===================
Additional blah blah blah I have seen...

One other thing that may or may not have any meaning...
I think I can get into DOS or the like...
The way I get into DOS (or what I think is DOS):
I install my recovery disk, when it displays the recovery screen ( and says this will re-format the drive, all files will be overwritten do you want to continue? ) I choose cancel and it puts me to C:\

Once in C:\ I can dir and cls but tree won't work it says
CDR101: Not ready reading drive Q
Abort, Retry, Fail?

With dir I see only files, no directories.

In this C:\ or whatever it is my autoexec.bat reads weirdly.

I cant see it all bc when I hit C:\type autoexec.bat it goes flying down the screen at lightning speed
I tried adding a /p but it wont take it.
I also tried ctrl+s but it is already at the end of the file by the time I mash the keys.
I tried edit autoexec.bat NO GO
I tried edlin autoexec.bat NO GO

What I can see at the bottom of the autoexec.bat is


:error
SET TEMP=
echo No TEMP drive found
goto finished
a:\xcopy32 a:\*.* %temp% /s >NUL
%temp%
%temp%subst a: %temp%

path=a$p$g
duse.exe INIT
set CD=Q
set CDROM=%Q%:
lh MSCDEX.EXE Q:tools\*.* %temp% /s >NUL
cls
echo CD-ROM =%CDROM%
langmenu.bat
:finished


This may be something Created by the Ultimate Boot CD
Or by my Quick recovery disk
It just seems weird I would think the path would point to my directories.




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