Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Wireless Range?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Ryan 3000

Ryan 3000

  • Members
  • 834 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maryland
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 March 2008 - 04:03 PM

I'm soon getting an Archos 605 WiFi. One of the little-known features of this is that you can connect to your home computer to stream media. Of course, the only problem is, you're not always at home. I read a little bit in PCMag that says you can extend the range of wireless transmitters. I would like my Archos to be able to detect my home signal from a mile away. Is this unrealistic? Because sometimes I get web signals from the universities near my house, and they show high bars.
No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Billy O'Neal

Billy O'Neal

    Visual C++ STL Maintainer


  • Malware Response Team
  • 12,304 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redmond, Washington
  • Local time:01:12 AM

Posted 11 March 2008 - 04:06 PM

Yes, that is not possible. If you have acess to a tower, you can get signal a mile away, but only if you are using a directional antenna.

Billy3

PS: May want to look at this http://www.cantenna.com/
Twitter - My statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation, and are my own personal opinion. (But you already knew that, right?)
Posted Image

#3 E-Mu

E-Mu

    Bleepin' Psychopomp


  • Members
  • 1,386 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Local time:08:12 AM

Posted 12 March 2008 - 03:25 PM

This may be a bit extreme as for what Ryan was looking for!

With this he's gonna have to lug the thing about to be able to connect to his home network and it dont look small!!!
~ E-Mu ~

"Emu, You Moo, We All Moo for Emu!" <-- Thanks to Animal

"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#4 Billy O'Neal

Billy O'Neal

    Visual C++ STL Maintainer


  • Malware Response Team
  • 12,304 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redmond, Washington
  • Local time:01:12 AM

Posted 12 March 2008 - 03:33 PM

Yes, but its the only thing thats going to get you a mile range under FCC regulations. In addition it is directional. The cantenna is useful really only for point to point applications. Because I dont know the OP's exact application, I threw it out there.

Remember, the wi-fi spec says 100 meters max distance. Anything longer than that needs a bigger antenna, as higher power output is banned by the FCC.

Maybe one of those sprint cards or something....
Billy3
Twitter - My statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation, and are my own personal opinion. (But you already knew that, right?)
Posted Image

#5 Ryan 3000

Ryan 3000
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 834 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maryland
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 14 March 2008 - 05:04 PM

I'm serious when I ask this question: have you ever heard of anyone RAIDing some WiFi transmitters to get more signal range?
No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land.

#6 Billy O'Neal

Billy O'Neal

    Visual C++ STL Maintainer


  • Malware Response Team
  • 12,304 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redmond, Washington
  • Local time:01:12 AM

Posted 14 March 2008 - 05:07 PM

Yes. Any 802.11n compliant device uses MIMO ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimo ) to increase signal range. But that still wont get anywhere near a mile. ~3-4 hundred meter max.

Billy3
Twitter - My statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation, and are my own personal opinion. (But you already knew that, right?)
Posted Image




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users