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Serious Boot Problem


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#1 lightpanther

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 05:26 AM

Hi there. I'm hoping I can get some help here.

Ok, I will try to provide as much help as possible here, in sequence of what happened, and what I have done since. I seem to have made the situation much worse rather than better. Please read it without skipping if you can help, as the sequence of events are probably important.

1) I acquired (not sure how) the "SmitFraud" infection. So I google some advice on that, download the "SmitFraudFix" utility and follow the advice on it, which is available in general around the internet.

2) here is the first oddity...the instructions said to reboot in safe mode in order to run SmitFraudFix...however when trying to press F8 in order to do this on booting up, I found that nothing would appear visible on the monitor, no matter how long I left this.

3) so I then had to boot back to normal mode and run SmitFraudFix there, as I could not get safe mode to show on the monitor (Apple Cinema HD 23" widescreen). Running SmitFraudFix seemed to get rid of a good portion of the infection, however, certain fake popups with ridiculous warnings were still showing up frequently, both windows style popups and from the system tray. These were definitely part of the infection, because it was by clicking on one of these originally that got me the "spyshredder", the virus or malware associated with this thing.

4) Ok, here is where it gets REALLY SERIOUS. I decided, unwise probably, that I should try to get the computer into safe mode so that I could do the fix procedure exactly as was advised. I therefore located advice for starting in safe mode by a means other than F8 and this was to do Start >> Run >> msconfig >> and then on the BOOT.INI, set it to start up in safe mode. Oh boy, bad move!!

5) again, nothing would show on the screen, only now, I couldn't get back to normal mode either or do anything, because nothing showed up on the darn screen!

6) I attached an older monitor to the computer (though only 2-3 years old). Not exactly sure of its specs, but it has KDSusa on the front. Anyway, when booting with this, I am able to see things on the screen, BUT....

7) It boots to safe mode with the "safe mode" text at all four corners of the screen, but that is ALL that is on the screen...the rest of it is black (though there is a cursor)..clicking does nothing etc....and in a few seconds the familiar "Windows XP is starting up blue logo screen appears (??) and next it prompts me to enter as either "adminstrator" or "owner" big-button style, telling me that I can add or change profiles after I have logged on (this was never part of the normal logging procedure, and if these profiles were set up I haven't used them at all since I got the computer, though I'm sure I called something owner at some point, way back. ***Just to be clear here....when logging in mormally, before these problems, and with the Apple Cinema monitor, there was never any such login screen appearing (since perhaps way back originally setting up the PC, though I can ba rely remember) when I was asked to choose between profiles. Anyway,

8) WHEN I CLICK EITHER OF THESE, WHICH I HAVE TO TO GET ANY FURTHER, IT SAYS "LOADING PROFILES" OR SOMETHING AND THEN INFURIATINGLY THE MACHINE REBOOTS AGAIN...EVERY TIME. IT'S IN A LOOP, AND I CAN'T GET BACK TO WINDOWS TO RESET the BOOT.INI OPTION from START >> RUN

I don't know if this behavior is part of the infection or a result of what I have done, but either way, help!!!

These things i have tried already: With the old monitor running, I can get the boot options menu to work. I have of course selected "boot in normal mode", but it doesn't...it boots with the above behavior...first with the blank "safe mode" screen....then onto the windows logo screen with user login options, administrator and owner (the name for myself, that I created, originally, I think). Choosing either simply starts the login and then reboots after a few seconds, on the same cycle

I CAN access the BIOS (F2) menu and the recovery F11 menu, though I haven't dared to do anything with either yet. On the boot menu, I have tried just about every option....normal, safe, safe with command prompt, last working configuration, enable VGA settings...it still comes back with the same behavior as described above.

I have a lot of important data on the main machine, and am terrified to lose it, so am writing this on a very cheap laptop which I hardly ever use.

Please offer your suggestions for what I can do from here. I'm not a computer geek, so please go easy on the jargon. Is there any way of getting a command prompt given the above behavior, and then using it to fix this problem or at least to get data files off to CDs before I do anything else.

Your help much appreciated. This is the most serious comp problem I've ever had.


Operating System is Windows XP with Service Pack 2
Additionally I can't locate my original XP installation CD. I guess I will have to obtain one from a friend. All software is legit, I just can't find the darn CD. I did have an old copy CD that I made, but it didn't boot with it, despite the boot order being correct so far as I know, and this makes me nervous that it won't boot from the installation CD when I can get my hands on one (or buy a new one if I have to?...cheaper than a new PC). Also, I got the computer in 2005...if I need to get a new installation CD will I have serious problems and/or product key issues if I get a newer one in order to be able to try a repair?

I am not sure whether this virus has corrupted something to do with the boot system and with safe mode, or whether this is a result of using the monitors as I have described. I'm not sure if the Apple Cinema monitor can even display safe mode (??)..if I could somehow get to a dos prompt or edit the BOOT.INI according to anyone's instructions, I might be on my way....but at the moment (as described) I can neither boot properly in safe mode or normal mode.

By the way I have seen the "pinned" topic about the bug in smitfraudfix...at this point, I am not sure yet if that is my problem or not.
Any thoughtful help will be greatly appreciated.

Edited by lightpanther, 05 March 2008 - 06:41 AM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 11:07 AM

using MSConfig to access (force) safe mode can be problematic when there is malware on your system and can make your computer unusable. Some types of malware can delete or alter the safeboot key in the registry resulting in the inability to reboot into safe mode or back to normal mode. If you use the /Safeboot option on the Boot.ini Tab to force safe mode when the F8 key does not work, it could have disastrous results. The Safeboot option modifies the Boot.ini file and you may be locked in a continuous reboot loop afterwards where you cannot get back to MSConfig and undo your selection.

Without being able to access your machine, there are limited options available.

...If a situation like this has happened to you it is possible to fix this problem by renaming your boot.ini file. The first step would be to use a boot disk to start your computer. If your computer does not have a floppy disk, then you can typically boot off the Windows CD that came with your computer in order to access the Windows Recovery Console...Once booted to a command prompt, you would simply rename your C:\Boot.ini file to another name like C:\Boot.ini.bak. The command to rename the file at the command prompt is:

ren C:\Boot.ini Boot.ini.bak

Once the file is renamed, you can then remove the boot disk and reboot your computer to get back to normal mode. When booting up after the rename, do not be surprised if you see an error stating that you do not have a valid Boot.ini file. When you get back to normal Windows mode, you can then rename C:\Boot.ini.bak to C:\Boot.ini file and run Msconfig again to remove the /safeboot flag.

Problems that can occur by forcing Safe Mode (scroll down)

If you don't have an emergency boot floppy, you may be able to use one created on another PC running Windows XP but there's no guarantee that it will boot your machine.

Another option is to create a Bootable CD:
Bart's way to create bootable CD-Roms
Hiren's BootCD
Ultimate Boot CD
EzReload Bootable CD
Windows and DOS Boot Disks

If this method does not give you access to your machine, then a repair or clean install is the next step but you will need your XP CD.
"Langa Letter: XP's No-Reformat, Nondestructive Total-Rebuild Option"
"How to perform a Repair Install".

If you don't have your XP CD you can download a Recovery Console ISO file and burn it as an image to a disk to get a bootable CD which will startup the Recovery Console for troubleshooting and fixing purposes. This is especially useful for those with OEM systems with factory restore partitions or disks but no original installation CD. Also read Creating A Windows XP Recovery Console CD Image.
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#3 lightpanther

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 06:04 PM

Thanks for the above. I will try this and let you guys know how I get on. I only did the msconfig thing at all because it was advice on some other page about how to deal with smitfraud :thumbsup: (its under tutorials here at "tutorial 61" I think). Anyway, the problem you describe certainly sounds like exactly the problem that I have...with the addition that my main monitor displays NOTHING during this boot loop!

I have a question. I cannot find the original installation CD (if it came with one, there's actually no mention of it in the computer user guide...it mentions rebooting from some backup copy on the hard drive, or rebooting using recovery disks that I was supposed to have burned when I got the machine (but unfortunatelky didn't). I do know that it all came pre-installed on this (gateway) machine from compUSA.

Anyway, my question is, if I use someone else's win XP home installation disk in order to try, is that likely to cause problems? (authorization or otherwise). Same question with a new XP installation disk. Would I be better to try to create one of the bootable cd options you mention?

Edited by lightpanther, 05 March 2008 - 06:07 PM.


#4 quietman7

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 09:34 PM

If Windows XP came preinstalled with your computer and you don't have a Microsoft Windows CD-ROM, the Recovery Console might be on one of the CDs the vendor bundled with your PC. If not, it is available as part of the Setup Disks for Floppy Boot Install from Microsoft. There are links provided for setup disks available for XP Pro and XP Home Edition which will also work for Windows 2000/ME/98. When you run the download, it puts the XP installation program, including the Recovery Console, onto a set of six floppy disks.

An alternative for those who have OEM systems with factory restore partitions or disks (but no original installation CD) is to download and use an ISO of the Recovery Console files:
NTFS4FreeDos ISO
Recovery Console ISO file
XP Recovery Console zip file.

You must burn the ISO file as an image to a disk to get a bootable CD which will startup the Recovery Console for troubleshooting and repair purposes. If you are not sure how to burn an image, please read How to write a CD/DVD image or ISO.

By policy Microsoft no longer allows OEM manufactures to include the original Windows XP CD-ROM on computers sold with Windows preinstalled. Instead, most computers manufactured and sold by OEM vendors come with a vendor-specific recovery disk or recovery partition for performing a clean factory restore.

A Recovery Disk is a CD-ROM or DVD data disc that contains a complete copy/image of the entire contents of the hard drive that will restore the system to its factory default state at a certain time. Essentially, it will reformat your hard drive, remove all data and restore the computer to the state it was in when you first purchased it. You will lose all data and have to reinstall all programs that you added afterwards. This includes all security updates from Microsoft so you will need to download/install them again.

Some factory restore CDs give you all the options of a full Microsoft Windows CD, but with better instructions and the convenience of having all the right hardware drivers. Others can do nothing except reformat your hard drive and restore it to the condition it was in when you bought the computer. Before using a factory recovery disk make sure you back up all your data, photos, etc to another source such as a CD or external hard drive. If you do a Google Search, you will find links to topics on how to obtain a replacement recovery disk from various vendors.

A Recovery Partition is used by some OEM manufacturers (Dell, HP, IBM, Gateway) instead of a recovery disk to store a complete copy of the hard disk's factory default contents for easy restoration. This consists of a hidden bootable partition containing various system recovery tools, including full recovery of the preinstalled Windows XP partition that will allow you to restore the computer to the state it was in when you first purchased it. The recovery software will then re-hide its own partition after creating a new partition and installing the software to it. Before using a recovery partition make sure you back up all your data, photos, etc to another source such as a CD or external hard drive.

Recovery partitions may only work with a start-up floppy disk or the user may be prompted immediately after the "Out Of Box Experience" (OOBE) to create backup CD-R disks for the software on the hard drive image for future use. Once the CD's are made, the Operating System, Drivers, or Applications can be reinstalled using the files on the hard drive or the backup CDs.

Some built in recovery partitions can be accessed by hitting Ctrl+F11, just F11 or F10 during bios startup. Others like those used by IBM Thinkpads will display a message at bootup instructing you to press F11 to boot from the recovery partition. For more information, see Understanding Partition recovery.

Again, if you do a Google search on recovery partitions, you can find information specifically related to the manufacturer of your machine. If you need additional assistance, you can start a new topic in the Windows XP Home and Professional forum. Each manufacturer's instructions is somewhat different and members with the same type machine as yours could better help with step by step instructions.
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#5 lightpanther

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 10:53 PM

Quietman, I am a bit confused again now. Are you saying that I should try to burn a recovery console iso? Neither my main computer or this emergency laptop have floppy drives, so I cannot use a diskette. I certainly DON'T want to eliminate all data. Does the advice from your original post re changing the boot file to Boot.ini.back still apply? I don't want to reformat, since, as you say, I will lose all data. I'm sorry, I just want to be sure that I KNOW WHAT I"M DOING before I proceed. It would seem that if I can change the boot file back then the hell (might) be over?

#6 quietman7

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 11:06 PM

My first reply is the place to start.

I'm just providing you with different options to consider since you said you did not have the original CD. You also mentioned about rebooting from a backup copy on the hard drive or using recovery disks, so I wanted to explain what these options were and what happens if you use them.

Since your pc is not usable in its current state, you may have to use another computer to download an iso of the recovery console. Same would apply for the floppy setup disks if you had a floppy drive.
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#7 lightpanther

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 12:02 AM

Partil success! It has booted back to windows on the backup monitor, but

1) when I try to rename Boot.ini.bak *back* again, as per the original help post, it tells me that the system cannot find this file.

2) the system configuration utility has no "BOOT.INI" tab visible, though I did get a message that it was in diagnostic mode or something.

What to do here? I feel that I am close!

Edited by lightpanther, 06 March 2008 - 12:03 AM.


#8 quietman7

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 08:37 AM

I am going to have one of our technical advisors look at this thread and see if they can assist you further.
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#9 usasma

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 08:53 AM

What happens when you try to boot normally into your Windows installation? What exact error message do you receive?

The boot process is a "step by step" procedure - so the current error message is important to tell us where you are at this moment in time.
Unfortunately, quite a few boot issues show up as black screen issues, but there are known procedures for working them out.

The XP boot process is (roughly) as follows:

MBR
Boot Sector
NTLDR
- System registry hive
- ntoskrnl.exe
- hal.dll
NTOSKRNL.EXE
SMSS.EXE
- loads rest of registry
- win32k.sys (kernel mode)
- csrss.exe (user mode)
- Winlogon.exe
WINLOGON.EXE
- lsass.exe
- gina
- Services.exe
SERVICES.EXE
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#10 Papakid

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 10:21 AM

usasma, I believe lightpanther is able to boot into normal mode now but it sounds like Windows can't find the boot.ini.bak file--may be it was mistyped when renamed to Boot.ini.bak.

Please make sure that you can view all hidden files. Instructions on how to do this can be found here:

How to see hidden files in Windows

Then go to My Computer, and open your hard drive folder (local disk, probably C:) and check if there is a boot.ini file and that the spelling of the file name is correct. It should be safe to rename the file from there back to boot.ini by selecting the file and pressing F2, then type in the correct spelling. Then double-click the boot.ini file (if there) so that it opens in Notepad and copy and paste the entire contents back here. Do not edit the boot.ini file, just want to see its contents.

Or let us know if you can't find any boot.ini file at all.

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#11 lightpanther

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 11:02 AM

I have done as requested above and made all those hidden files visible etc (kept PC open on Windows all night just in case..I haven't dared to switch it off again yet in case I can't get back to windows!)

I do not see a Boot.ini file in the C:/ folder. I do see both autoexec.bat and config.sys

I then did an explorer search throughout drive C. There is a "boot.ini.backup" file, but it is in a different folder (C:\Windows\pss, whatever that is), also that file has a creation date of July 2007, so I'm not sure if it even has anything to do with what I have done over the`last 24 hours according to the help instructions above? (also, I didn't rename any file to "boot.ini.backup"; so far as I know I folowed the exact instructions in the help post, ie "Boot.ini.bak", but I don't see a file named that.


However, if it is useful, the contents of *THAT* file (ie the one in C:\Windows\pss) are as follows (minus the asterisks)

**********
[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Media Center
Edition" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
**********
I still have windows open.

Edited by lightpanther, 06 March 2008 - 12:14 PM.


#12 lightpanther

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 04:08 PM

Hi folks.

I believe I have recovered.
I copied the boot backup file I discovered in the /pss folder as I described above into the C:/ folder, renamed it to boot.ini....a BOOT.INI tab then appeared on the System Configuration Utility.

There are still some issues. I doubt that the malware which I had immediately prior to this problem is gone, and I need help getting rid of it without getting back to that same hellish problem! May I post an HJT file? Would that be useful? And should I post it here, in this thread, or elsewhere?

Although I have recovered boot capability, before I lost it I was still getting fake anti-spyware popups and system tray popups which I think were also fake. One of these popups spoke of an Adware.W32.ExpDwnldr or some such, and was certainly a fake. I haven't been back on long enough to determine whether those popups are still happening, but I strongly suspect infection fragments still on my PC. In addition, the system restore point capability appears locked, I presume by the malware.

Edited by lightpanther, 06 March 2008 - 04:33 PM.


#13 Papakid

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 10:32 PM

Sorry for the delay lightpanther, but you did a good job of basically fixing the boot loop problem by copying that backup to the C: folder--don't worry that it's an older file. It's safe to reboot back into normal mode. Try booting into safe mode with the F8 method only and don't be overly concerned if that still doesn't work, just go back to normal mode.

At this point, yes, you should post a HijackThis log. You may have more than a Smitfraud infection that has altered a registry key to prevent you booting into safe mode. If it's Bagle, you have to be sure it's completely removed before you can repair safeboot.

Please click on the following link and follow all the relevant instructions for precleaning and getting a log posted:

Preparation Guide For Use Before Posting A Hijackthis Log

Please confirm that you have run the required cleanup steps and if you have any problems or questions at all don't hesitate to post back in this topic. When you get the log posted, give a link to it here.

One question for you:

In addition, the system restore point capability appears locked, I presume by the malware.



Can you be more explicit? Did you try running System Restore and the buttons were grayed out? Please describe what happened. Many times SR is not working before malware removal is attempted because the SR cache is corrupt. Malware may also have damaged it in other ways. We like to have a working restore point before doing malware removal but that is not always possible. The tools used in malware removal make extensive backups so that there are other ways to recover from disaster and for other reasons it is best to troubleshoot SR problems after you are clean, but I would like to know what the nature of the problems is beforehand.

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#14 lightpanther

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Posted 07 March 2008 - 05:05 AM

Ok, thanks. Looks like I was a bit premature in posting my HJT log in the HJT forum, and I will need to post it again, as I hadn't taken all the steps on that link.

I have AVG trial and the latest HJT on my pc just now. Should I remove AGV before DLing any of the programs mentioned in the link, or is it safe for them all to be in place simultaneously?

#15 Papakid

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Posted 07 March 2008 - 10:04 AM

Oh I hadn't noticed you had posted your log here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/134931/smitfraud-activity-still-present-hjt-log/

Once you post a log you should not make any major changes to your computer. It's OK that you haven't done all the steps, from this point on all changes will be monitored and you will be given instructions for everything you need to do.

Since I'm already familiar with your situation and for some other reasons, I will get you started, but may have someone else come in to finish up.

To answer your question, the only thing in the Prep guide that could possible clash is if you installed more than one antivirus with autoprotection or more than one firewall. A quick glance at your log shows that you have neither. AVG Anti-Spyware is not an antivirus and even if you have the Windows firewall enabled it is useless at blocking outgoing packets and thus protecting from loss of sensitive information.

I also do still see some seriously complex malware that needs other tools besides SmitfraudFix. It's been my experience that a system running with no protection, such as yours, has malware that digs so deep and causes so much damage (such as the bootsafe issue) that it is better to reformat and reinstall windows and pay better attention to your system's security. I know you've been asked about this once already, and you've opted to try to clean up. My advice is to reformat, if you change your mind and decide to follow my advice, post that to your HJT log thread.

To avoid confusion, this thread will be closed while you have a HijackThis log pending. It can be reopened once there is a resolution to your log topic, for example if you need help with a reformat.

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