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How Do Get Into Web Site Design For Career?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 EnigmaChick

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 05:41 AM

Recently I have been seriously considering going into this industry and as I understand it, there are a few different avenues to get into it. Now for a start I can't code hardly at all and I do have trouble with even learning it in general, usually a month after I learned some basic HTML I forgot most of it and I find coding rather boring. I am mainly interested in the design aspect of web site development. I however do understand that I would probably need to learn and probably use at least HTML but I'm hoping to use coding as little as possible. So basically I'm looking for opinions from people who are in or who have had experience with website design to give me some ideas.

Edited by EnigmaChick, 26 February 2008 - 05:42 AM.

I'm waiting for a average computer that can't be infected with malware unless it's intentionally ........ 5 years later: I am still waiting.

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#2 Noot

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 07:18 AM

You can do web design with just design only, course you will have to know basic HTML even if you use a WYSIWYG program, such as Dreamweaver.

Though it would be better to know more coding, such as Javascript, just because with my looking around, a lot of employers (even bigger ones) are asking web designers to know some coding, Javascript, some PHP, etc. You don't have to be a code head, but having some knowledge of coding is probably a must.

It's mostly a money saving thing, as people don't have to pay money for a programmer and then pay money for a designer.

Of course, I'm not saying you can't find a job where you can just design, but on average you'll have to know a little bit of both.


Good luck! :thumbsup:
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"I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving
that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority."
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#3 EnigmaChick

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 07:48 AM

Yes well I've looked at a lot of job positions for web designers or developers just to see what they generally look for and it is so complicated, they want you to generally know up to 4 different coding types or more, I'd be too difficult to be to learn things like ASP, PHP and such, however I could probably get a grip on javscript and HTML.
I'm waiting for a average computer that can't be infected with malware unless it's intentionally ........ 5 years later: I am still waiting.

A Malware Fighting Tiger's Blog


#4 groovicus

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 09:07 AM

The way to get into web page design is to design web pages. The way to learn HTML is to use HTML, every day. The way to become proficient at any language is to use it. You can hardly be proficient at designing web pages if you do not know the limitations and capabilities of the languages being used. HTML has somewhere right around 100 tags is all, and some of them you will likely never use. If this is something you truly want to do, then it will be trivial to learn it. So practice, starting out with some basic web pages, and then build from there. If you want a career doing web design, then you have to design some web pages. Period. :thumbsup:

#5 Wysi Free

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 11:12 AM

All hail groovi cus :flowers:

I agree 100% with his advice because I have said the same thing once or twice.

The learning thing is you really need to do something 25 times before you master it. Hence, practice makes perfect.

A good way to push your knowledge envelop is to read boards like this one and solve the problem. Even if you don't post you can compare your solution with the guy who answers.

There are lots of good places to start learning.

Good Luck,

Wysi
:thumbsup:

#6 Noot

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 06:37 PM

I knew there was something I forgot to add to my post. Experience is definitely the key. I could've gotten a 41k/yr job doing web design for a medical university school doing/managing their web site but because I didn't have 2 years of experience, I didn't get the job.

Plus, it's always good to, as Groovicus mentioned, doing web sites is key. Not only does coding things become old hat, but there's always something new to learn. I've learned a lot more working on my own for others than I did in college, only because they can only show you so much in such a short amount of time.


Again, good luck and don't forget to have fun. :thumbsup:
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"I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving
that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority."
E. B. White (1899 - 1985)

#7 EnigmaChick

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 12:33 AM

Yes well I agree with that but one thing I'm concerned about is there really much work available for web designers rather than those that do basically all the website stuff, including the databases, creating forums ,etc? Most of the jobs I see are basically looking for people who can run all that stuff and not many or any for mainly the design aspect. Of course I realise designing and making a website includes languages like HTML, javascript and so on but I'm not all that interested in the whole aspect of designing databases, Web 2.0(or whatever they're calling those things) parts of a website, etc.

Edited by EnigmaChick, 27 February 2008 - 12:34 AM.

I'm waiting for a average computer that can't be infected with malware unless it's intentionally ........ 5 years later: I am still waiting.

A Malware Fighting Tiger's Blog


#8 EnigmaChick

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 04:35 AM

What I should have mentioned is I actually do have experience in this field, however not professionally though. I've probably made around 4-6 different web sites(either on the net at a time or I abandoned them) but generally I used WYSIWYG programs and some specialised ones for things like javascript menus, so I didn't really use HTML, I did learn a bit a few years ago but I quickly forgot it, obviously you need to use something regularly enough or for a long enough time or you generally don't remember it. My design in general was not great to begin with but that was almost 10 years ago and I was starting with website templates before those programs but now I feel I grasp the main design concepts.

Edited by EnigmaChick, 27 February 2008 - 04:36 AM.

I'm waiting for a average computer that can't be infected with malware unless it's intentionally ........ 5 years later: I am still waiting.

A Malware Fighting Tiger's Blog


#9 groovicus

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 09:25 AM

is there really much work available for web designers rather than those that do basically all the website stuff, including the databases, creating forums ,etc?


You are really talking about a wide variety of skills here. I am not sure what you mean by 'website stuff', but as a whole, you are talking about software engineering, which is designing a project from the ground up, whether it be a simple web page, or a complex web application distributed across multiple servers and databases. Software engineers (if I may paint with a broad brush) are the ones who hire people to code the web pages, do the database integration, code the middle tier, and do customer surveys. In a one or two person shop, a single person may wear many of these hats.

I guess the point that I am trying to make is that a website engineer is not an entry level position, unless of course it is your 'company'. But in that case, you are going to be responsible for all aspects of the project, unless you can afford to hire someone to carry out your project for you. Until then, you need to hone your skills while designing dozens of websites, even if they are not 'active'. They can still be used in a portfolio so that you can demonstrate to a potential employer that you have a grasp of design (why blue is considered a poor color for web design, and when that rule can be ignored), that you understand how humans interact with websites (including what it really means to be visually impaired, and how that affects design considerations), and that you understand trends in technology (AJAX, for instance).

And yes, there are plenty of opportunities for people skilled in various aspects of software and computing, although the popular opinion is that there is not. Everybody seems to think that since the dotcom crash, all computer related jobs went off shore.

#10 EnigmaChick

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 10:42 AM

Well it seems then I've been looking in the wrong places because the ones I see want ones that can basically handle it all.
It'd be nice to find a way to find ones that don't, I mean that specialise as such and ones that don't need experience in things like PHP and .ASP(I think that's what it's called).

Edited by EnigmaChick, 27 February 2008 - 10:48 AM.

I'm waiting for a average computer that can't be infected with malware unless it's intentionally ........ 5 years later: I am still waiting.

A Malware Fighting Tiger's Blog


#11 Noot

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 08:03 PM

That's just going to take a lot of searching. Try expanding your search parameters. Do a country-wide search and see what happens. They're out there, it just takes searching, more or less depending on where you live. The bigger the city, the more chance you have of finding a wider range of web design jobs.
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that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority."
E. B. White (1899 - 1985)

#12 pislkie

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 01:32 PM

Most web design bureaus will endeavour to recruit multi skilled designers. This is because the distribution between all the "Specialisms" is neither uniform nor consistent. Being able to swithch from what you like or preffer doing to a hot spot or bottleneck would make you far more employable and worth the salary that you aspire to be paid.
>>>piskie<<<

#13 jacobroufa

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 08:08 AM

- learn xhtml/css/javascript. keep standards compliant. even if you "just want to do the design" you will still have to learn how to use xhtml and css and possibly javascript.

- build websites in your spare time. take all of the time you possibly could have to do other stuff and build websites in that time. if you still enjoy it after a few weeks of this then maybe you could still consider finding a career in it. web stuff you have to love otherwise you burn out quickly.

- visit sites like alistapart.com or cssglobe.com

- dont use dreamweaver!!!!!!!! period! i dont care what people above said or what anyone things. if you use dreamweaver you will get lazy and you wont learn things the right way. then when something doesnt work and you cant figure out out what good does dreamweaver do for you, huh??

- dont be afraid to ask questions because there will be people out there (like me and the people above) who have been in your shoes before!

good luck :thumbsup:

#14 Samsbc12

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 11:51 AM

- visit sites like alistapart.com or cssglobe.com

- dont use dreamweaver!!!!!!!! period! i dont care what people above said or what anyone things. if you use dreamweaver you will get lazy and you wont learn things the right way. then when something doesnt work and you cant figure out out what good does dreamweaver do for you, huh??



Not so true. Using Dreamweaver to learn my not be the best, but I could code W3C by hand without Dreamweaver, but I choose to use Dreamweaver. Granted I am mostly in code view, It has a lot of features for coders as well. I like syntax highlighting, that fact that it can match up braces, spot invalid code, interface php with a database. I also like the ability to preview my code in the design view without always having to save and upload(if you are using server side code without an easy testing server). I also enjoy code completion and the drop downs makes coding a CSS style sheet a piece of cakes. This does not mean I am lazy, but when you have multiple websites and short deadlines productivity is key. Especially if you want to me in industry and doing this for a living.

All that said though, you need to understand what IDE's like Dreamweaver are doing since you most definitely will have to change some code, no IDE is perfect.




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