Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Ip Address Problem


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 djb3032

djb3032

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:31 PM

Posted 24 February 2008 - 09:36 PM

Hello,

I have an IP addressing problem with my home network. I'll try to be brief.

I've been using two PCs (one desktop, one laptop) with a Linksys 4 port switch for about two years. All are set up for DHCP and I've had no problems at all until recently. Both PCs are Dells running Windows XP Professional SP2.

In the last week, the laptop has begun exhibiting strange behavior. When I boot the laptop and then connect it to the switch, the router attempts to provide an address (usually 192.168.1.103) but the laptop will not accept it. Instead, I receive a limited or no connectivity notice and the IP address on the PC reads 169.254.73.173. Using Ipconfig /renew, release, etc. do not help.

If I connect the laptop to the switch before I boot, everything runs as I would expect. The laptop accepts the address given and all is well.

This isn't normal behavior for this PC. In the past, I would frequently boot then connect, disconnect, etc., throughout the day with no address assignment issues. Through all of this, the desktop runs as always with no problems. That leads me to suspect the switch is not the problem.

I've read that 169.254.X.X addresses are not valid addresses and are assigned if XP cannot obtain a serviceable address. That I understand, but this connectivity problem is new.

This problem occurs when I hardwire into the switch and when I attempt to connect wirelessly to a Linksys AP that is also connected to the switch.

Firewall and other security settings have not been changed recently.

Is TCP/IP or Winsock corrupted?

Thanks.

djb3032

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 usasma

usasma

    Still visually handicapped (avatar is memory developed by my Dad


  • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert
  • 25,072 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southeastern CT, USA
  • Local time:11:31 PM

Posted 28 February 2008 - 08:59 AM

Do you use hibernation or standby/sleep on the laptop? If so, stop using it - it'll mess with your network settings more than it'll help (IME)

I'd suspect that this would be an issue with the master browser on the network (but I'm just guessing). I'd have to suggest first shutting everything down completely.

Then power up the modem and wait 3 minutes
then power up the hub/switch/router and wait 3 minutes
then power up the wireless access point and wait 3 minutes
then power up the PC's and see what happens.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#3 Cyb3r_Ninj@

Cyb3r_Ninj@

  • Members
  • 169 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silicon Valley
  • Local time:09:31 PM

Posted 29 February 2008 - 02:20 PM

The IP address range 169.254.0.0 - 169.255.255.255 is reserved for Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA); Microsoft PCs will revert to APIPA addresses in the event that a DHCP server or Default Gateway cannot be reached. Windows will only wait 6 seconds for a DHCP leased address to be applied after startup.

Here is the Microsoft KB article which details APIPA:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/255836/en-us

Have you tried to manually configure the TCP/IP Properties and set a Static IP address to determine if that has any effect?

Since there seems to be an issue with one machine receiving a DHCP leased address and ipconfig /release | ipconfig /renew are not helping with the DHCP lease process, try bypassing it altogether by setting the APIPA addressed machine to a manually assigned Static IP address. We know your desktop PC is not encountering any connectivity problems therefore, the information contained in the command output should be viable and allow you to setup a Static IP address on your laptop. Run the following command a the command prompt on your desktop machine:

ipconfig /all

Network Connections
On your laptop, open up the Network Connections folder, single-click to highlight the network connection which you want to configure the static IP address on (i.e. Local Area Connection OR Wireless Network Connection). Right-click the connection and choose Properties. In the Network Connection Properties dialog box, you want to select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in the scrolling menu under "This connection uses the following items." With the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) option highlighted, click Properties to bring up the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties applet.

Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties -> General Tab
This applet has two tabs, General and Alternate Configuration. Let's just start working on the General tab, you will want to select the radio button to indicate "Use the following IP address." on the laptop, which you are going to attempt a Static IP address configuration, you will want to copy the following information from the ipconfig output on your desktop PC (or any other PC which is connected to the network with a known functional Network / Internet connection):

Copy this info:
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
Preferred DNS Server (first one listed in ipconfig)
Alternate DNS Server (second one listed in ipconfig)

Choose an IP address that is close in proximity to your desktop PC - you can just use the next numerical number in sequence, but there is nothing which says you can't use any random IP address as long as it is within the same subnet. I'd advise using sequential IP addresses or moving up in increments of 10. I.e. desktop PC IP 192.168.1.20, setup laptop IP 192.168.1.30. For troubleshooting purposes, keep a standard pattern so that if necessary, you can recall different IP addresses from memory in case the information is not readily at hand.

Once you setup the Static IP address information on the laptop check your network connectivity. Ping the desktop from the laptop and vice versa to confirm that those two machines are able to communicate with each other. Open up your web browser and open up the same web page on both machines. IF this does not successfully achieve a network AND Internet connection on the laptop, switching back to DHCP and APIPA is as simple as clicking the radio button in the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).

If you find that you are able to successfully connect to the Internet and your SoHo network using the Static IP address, and you would like to utilize this as your primary workaround for DHCP lease problems resulting in an APIPA assigned IP address, you can do the following:

Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties -> Alternate Configuration tab
If you have configured a Static IP address in the General tab and have tested it and confirmed that the numbers are functional, you can set this IP address information into the Alternate Configuration tab for future use, and yet still have DHCP Enabled as the default method of configuring this information. IF a DHCP server is not able to be contacted or a DHCP lease unable to be accepted | granted, your machine will revert to the Static IP address information stored on this tab. Simply plug in the tested numbers you used in the General tab by clicking the User Configured radio button on the Alternate Configuration tab.

There is one additional set of numbers which you will need to record and input on the Alternate Configuration tab which were not options in the General tab, these are the Primary and Secondary WINS servers. This information is listed in the output of the ipconfig /all command.

Try setting a Static IP address and post feedback for more advice.
***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#4 djb3032

djb3032
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:31 PM

Posted 02 March 2008 - 02:45 PM

Cyb3r_Ninj@,

Thanks for the advice. I made the suggested changes to APIPA under the "Alternate Configuration" tab. DHPC addressing is now working. Connectivity has been up for several hours under a variety of conditions. This appears to have resolved the problem. In fact, I'm typing this response from the formerly troublesome PC.

Thanks again. I could not have resolved this without your help.

Also, thank you to USAMSA for their suggestion as well.


djb3032

#5 Cyb3r_Ninj@

Cyb3r_Ninj@

  • Members
  • 169 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silicon Valley
  • Local time:09:31 PM

Posted 04 March 2008 - 02:05 PM

djb3032:

Right on! Good to hear you were able to resolve the issue!
***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#6 tjgrcd

tjgrcd

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:31 PM

Posted 06 March 2008 - 08:43 PM

I am having the same issue but when i try and pull up the ipconfig screen i get a flash of a DOS screen and then nothing. i was able to input the IP address and got the computer connected but cannot pull up internet access. i was unable to get the information on the DNS server due to no access to ipconfig. ANy ideas on what i did wrong.

#7 Cyb3r_Ninj@

Cyb3r_Ninj@

  • Members
  • 169 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silicon Valley
  • Local time:09:31 PM

Posted 07 March 2008 - 01:10 PM

tjgrcd:

OK, this is to follow up on the PM you sent me; if the Command Prompt is not working properly for you on the non-connected PCs, we can still program the information without having to consult the ipconfig command.

On the Internet Connected PC:

What you want to do is run the following command from the Command Prompt on the functional connected PC:

ipconfig /all

You will want to either keep this information on-screen for comparison purposes OR you can output it to a text file and print it out; to redirect the command output to a text file you can run the following command:

ipconfig /all > filename.txt

"Filename" can be whatever you want it to be, remember that it will save the text file to the location that is prefixed in the command prompt; usually C:\Documents and Settings\username>
If the Command Prompt is not working on the Internet connected PC, you can get the information from the Network Connections applet just as well in GUI format rather than CLI format. Do the following:

Start >> Connect to >> Show all Connections OR Start >> Network Connections OR Start >> Control Panel >> Network Connections

All three methods lead to the same applet.

Now once you are in the Network Connections applet, you want to right-click the Wireless Network Connection (or whichever connection is malfunctioning on the other PCs) and choose Status. This will bring up the Wireless Network Connection status applet, which should contain two tabs General and Support. You want to click the Support tab, then click the Details button. This will open up the Newtork Connection Details applet, which will return the following information for you:

:: Physical Address
:: IP Address
:: Subnet Mask
:: Default Gateway
:: DHCP Server
:: Lease Obtained
:: Lease Expires
:: DNS Servers
:: WINS Servers

You will want to keep this information on screen since it cannot be redirected to an output file. If you are so inclined you can take a screen shot of the applet and paste into a Word document and print out.

On the non-Internet Connected PCs:

On the non-connected computer(s), you can find out the ipconfiguration information without going to the Command Prompt using the Network Connections applet and following the instructions as stated above, you want to compare the Details tab on the Internet connected PC to the Details tab on the non-Internet connected PCs.

If you notice differences in any of the following information (on the non-Internet connected PCs), I would try setting up a Static IP Address on these systems and test your Internet connectivity:
:: Physical Address
:: IP Address
:: Subnet Mask
:: Default Gateway
:: DHCP Server
:: Lease Obtained
:: Lease Expires
:: DNS Servers
:: WINS Servers

Test network connectivity using the ping command to / from each non-Internet connected machine to the Internet connected machine. Test Internet connectivity by opening up the same web page in your browser on each machine to verify if it is able to resolve the web pages. Refer to my post in this thread on February 29, 2008. If that does not work for you, post back for further advice - remember to include the IP configuration information that is being returned on the non-Internet connected PCs and what behaviors you are experiencing.
***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#8 tos226

tos226

    BleepIN--BleepOUT


  • Members
  • 1,568 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:LocalHost
  • Local time:11:31 PM

Posted 07 March 2008 - 05:21 PM

We might be understanding the cmd issue differently. Based on the bold section (my emphasis),

I am having the same issue but when i try and pull up the ipconfig screen i get a flash of a DOS screen and then nothing. i was able to input the IP address and got the computer connected but cannot pull up internet access. i was unable to get the information on the DNS server due to no access to ipconfig. ANy ideas on what i did wrong.


My reading is that some command, such as ipconfig was not written on the DOS window, but on the Run prompt.
1. Start
2. Select Run
3. when the "open" textbox appears, type "cmd" without the quotes and hit Enter
Does the command window come up, usually black, and it normally says something close to this

Microsoft Windows 2000 [Version 5.00.2195]
© Copyright 1985-2000 Microsoft Corp.

C:\>

If not, I'm done, subsequent advice stands.
If yes, if the command window came up,
4. next to that ">" type in "ipconfig /all" without the quotes, and with a space before the /

then continue with Cyb3r_Ninj@'s advice




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users