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How To Block Limewire?


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#1 shawnvw

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 01:56 AM

My techie friend - who was here to configure my kid's computer - told him never, ever to install Limewire. (Security concerns.) I also told him never, ever to install Limewire. (I'm sick of the porn.) However, it seems that every few months, he's put it back - not on his computer, but on the pristine family computer.

How can I be sure that Limewire is completely deleted? I've had trouble tracking down all parts of it in the past.

Also, is there some sneaky way of keeping Limewire from being reinstalled, or at least from running?

Edited by shawnvw, 15 February 2008 - 01:57 AM.


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#2 rongchaua

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:38 AM

@shawnvw: Do you have a firewall? If you have one, you can use it to block Limewire from accessing Internet.

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#3 ruby1

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 05:48 PM

My techie friend - who was here to configure my kid's computer - told him never, ever to install Limewire. (Security concerns.) I also told him never, ever to install Limewire. (I'm sick of the porn.) However, it seems that every few months, he's put it back - not on his computer, but on the pristine family computer.

How can I be sure that Limewire is completely deleted? I've had trouble tracking down all parts of it in the past.

Also, is there some sneaky way of keeping Limewire from being reinstalled, or at least from running?



two thoughts; to rid the limewire do a system restore to prior TO its installation

to prevent its unwanted installation try perhaps creating a separate General User account in which downloads are forbidden ( and keep your own access separate and behind a log in and password protected section )

#4 Wendy K. Walker

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 01:47 AM

Hi shawnvw,

So how old is the boy anyway? And if he has his own computer why is he using what you called the family computer to get his porn?

I'm guessing that your machines are running Windows XP when I say this so if they aren't then this might now work or be right for your situation.

There are a minimum of four Administrative passwords that you need to set on your machine, at least three of which are almost always overlooked by parents whenever they set up their PC's, and most techie's overlook those passwords too for that matter.

Not to worry though as your little juvenile knows where to look for those suckers and if they are unprotected he\she just chuckles and things 'right mom' as they forge ahead.

Most parents have figured out that there are three different types of accounts on their machines; 1.) Administrative, which has TOTAL run of the machine. 2.) Limited User, which as its name implies has limited run of the machine and 3.) Guest, which is essentially a limited user account that anyone can sign onto to get on the Internet.

Whether you intend to use them or not there should be at least TWO Administrative accounts on your PC, one that you rely on for day to day use, and the other as a failsafe in the event that the primary gets corrupted somehow.

TWO is also the MAXIMUM number of Admin accounts that should be on any one machine AND the head of the house hold should be the owner of both of those suckers. Both of those Admin accounts should be Password protected too, and not with some wimpy password like 'mypassword', '12345678', or qwertyu' either.

Kids are a lot slicker than you think and they know that parents are notoriously lazy when it comes to computer security so use something like 'Gsl@btx=Gb5' for your password or they'll be hacked into your account before you can blink.

OK, if you do that much it makes it a little harder for your kid to get to their favorite porn sites. Now reboot your machine and start banging frantically on the F8 key as it starts up. When the menu opens choose Safe Mode and whatever OS you are running XP, Vista or whatever.

When that menu opens you will notice that there is ONE more account listed that what you had setup in regular Windows. That account will be named "ADMINISTRATOR" so if you have just set up two Admin accounts like I described you'll see three different accounts in Safe Mode.

In my case those three accounts are named 1.) Administrator 2.) Wendy 3.) Owner. Most people never give it a second thought BUT that Administrator account is UNPROTECTED ans anyone who reboots your PC into Safe Mode will have total access to your machine until you stick a password in it.

The other two places that kids know how to get to to access a PC are in the system BIOS and that's done at bootup too. Different systems have different methods of accessing the BIOS but you can almost bet that your kids have already learned how to do that from some creep at school.

I say that because I learned where to go to do this stuff when I heard some creep sitting behind me telling a girl just how easy it would be for her to do just that.

Anyway, you should access your BIOS and stick a password on both of those access points, one of which is called a 'Super User', to prevent your kid from sneaking in through the back door.

Make sure that your kid has a limited account and check it through your control panel every week or so to see if he's figured out a way to change it to admin.

This part

every few months, he's put it back

makes me want to ask "Why haven't you broken a couple of his fingers yet?"

I better go as this is way long already.

Wendy
TRUST NO ONE...! EXCEPT For The Beloved Computer Geek Helping You In The MALWARE FORUMS.

Do Unto Others Before They Have A Chance To Do Unto You.

HP Pavilion 512n [Rescued from a pile of trash on the side of the road] 128 MB SDRAM, 60 GB Hard Drive, Windows XP, Home Edition, SP3, COMODO Anti Vitus and Firewall.




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