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Infected With Smitfraud-c. Coreservice


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#1 johnd2008

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 04:37 AM

Spybot will not rid me of this, nor can Avast using a boot-time scan. I need help to do this correctly. Symptoms so far include Internet Exporer popping up with blank pages. I normally use FireFox or Netscape.
Pop-ups occur when I access one of the other browsers.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 09:44 AM

This infection is basically a rootkit found with certain smitfraud infections and identified by Spybot S&D as Smitfraud-C.CoreService. It is sometimes protected by a driver which must be identified and removed in order to remove the infection so the following fix may not work.

Please download SDFix by AndyManchesta and save it to your desktop.
alternate zipped version
When using this tool, you must use the Administrator's account or an account with "Administrative rights"
  • Very Important! Temporarily disable your anti-virus, script blocking and any anti-malware real-time protection before performing a scan. They can interfere with SDFix or remove some of its embedded files which may cause "unpredictable results".
  • Click on this link to see a list of programs that should be disabled. The list is not all inclusive.
  • Disconnect from the Internet before running SDFix.
  • Double click SDFix.exe and it will extract the files to %systemdrive%
  • (this is the drive that contains the Windows Directory, typically C:\SDFix).
  • DO NOT use it just yet.
Reboot your computer in "Safe Mode" using the F8 method. To do this, restart your computer and after hearing your computer beep once during startup (but before the Windows icon appears) press the F8 key repeatedly. A menu will appear with several options. Use the arrow keys to navigate and select the option to run Windows in "Safe Mode".

Open the SDFix folder and double click RunThis.bat to start the script.
  • Type Y to begin the cleanup process.
  • It will remove any Trojan Services or Registry Entries found then prompt you to press any key to Reboot.
  • Press any Key and it will restart the PC.
  • When the PC restarts, the Fixtool will run again and complete the removal process then display Finished, press any key to end the script and load your desktop icons.
  • Once the desktop icons load, the SDFix report will open on screen and also save a copy into the SDFix folder as Report.txt.
  • Copy and paste the contents of Report.txt in your next reply.
  • Be sure to re-enable your anti-virus and other security programs before connecting to the Internet.
-- If this error message is displayed when running SDFix: "The command prompt has been disabled by your administrator. Press any key to continue..."
Please go to Start Menu > Run > and copy/paste the following line:
%systemdrive%\SDFix\apps\swreg IMPORT %systemdrive%\SDFix\apps\Enable_Command_Prompt.reg
Press Ok and then run SDFix again.

-- If the Command Prompt window flashes on then off again on XP or Win 2000, please go to Start Menu > Run > and copy/paste the following line:
%systemdrive%\SDFix\apps\FixPath.exe /Q
Reboot and then run SDFix again.

-- If SDFix still does not run, check the %comspec% variable. Right-click My Computer > click Properties > Advanced > Environment Variables and check that the ComSpec variable points to cmd.exe.
%SystemRoot%\system32\cmd.exe


Note: Rootkits are very dangerous because they use advanced techniques as a means of accessing a computer system that bypasses security mechanisms and steal sensitive information which they send back to the hacker. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. Remote attackers use backdoor Trojans and rootkits as part of an exploit to to gain unauthorized access to a computer and take control of it without your knowledge.

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, you should immediately disconnect from the Internet until your system is cleaned. All passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed by using a different computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach.

Although the rootkit has been identified and may be removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume that because the rootkit has been removed the computer is now secure. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read "When should I re-format?" and "Reformatting the computer or troubleshooting; which is best?".
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#3 johnd2008

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 10:49 AM

Thanx for this solution. One more problem. I've been booting into safemode, but I'm running windows xp pro via boot camp on an intel macintosh. I can't use my keyboard in safemode, only my mouse. Any other suggestions?
I really feel like reformatting anyway after reading the above. There's one file that won't go away, qomjgda.dll that was infected with Trojan.Win32.BHO.auf in the systems32 folder. I've been able to delete any other infected files.

#4 quietman7

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 02:13 PM

If you have a wireless keyboard, low batteries can result in weak or no signals that can affect its functionality. Have you confirmed that the keyboard works on another machine? Have you tried using a another keyboard on your machine or a PS2 adapter?

If the problem only happens while trying to enter safe mode, keep in mind that it is a troubleshooting mode designed to start Windows with minimal drivers and running processes to diagnose problems with your computer. This means some of the programs that normally run when Windows starts will not run. This sometimes can include the drivers for your USB mouse.

The Bho.cvx Trojan can be difficult to remove because it is protected by a driver which loads much earlier than actions taken to delete it. Further, the Trojan is often accompanied by other .dll files which need to be identified and removed. Successful removal also requires identification of the CLSID (unique id number) associated with the BHO and use of specialized fix tools.

Your decision as to what action to take should be made by asking yourself the questions presented in the "When should I re-format?" link and whether it is worth the effort as described in the "Reformatting the computer or troubleshooting; which is best?" link. Reformatting and doing a clean install of the OS is the safest action but I cannot make that decision for you. Let me know how you wish to proceed.
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#5 johnd2008

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Posted 03 February 2008 - 10:37 PM

Thanx for your response. My keyboard is an Apple aluminum, brand new version. My computer is a Macintosh Intel duo core 2.4 ghz iMac 20". It's operating system 'Leopard' has a nifty utility program called 'Boot Camp' which allows a user to load a copy of Windows, Win XP Pro for me, onto the hard drive. It automatically partitions the drive, while booted in the Mac's OS. I was able to choose the size of the partition and adjust to nearly any size, but I chose a 32 GB size so that I could format it with a FAT 32 which will allow me to view and tinker with the files on it when I'm using the Mac OS. This would have been a great help if I'd had it set this way prior to the infection. I've since decided to re-format based on a review of your suggestion. The only password I used that could be a threat was for my paypal account which I've changed the password for and have reviewed it's activity history, which is fine. So now I'm up and running and slowly reconfiguring my XP OS. I can boot up in XP merely by turning the machine off and back on or restarting while holding the option key down and choosing which OS I want to boot up with. The keyboard will not work in safe mode and I've tried to find a solution but haven't yet. This is a definate problem so I plan on having a very solid backup solution available in case of future problems.




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