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Malware's New Infection Route: Photo Frames


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#1 Animal

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 03:46 PM

Malicious software code has turned up on a wide range of popular electronics, from digital photo frames to compact flash cards to MP3 players - even MP3-playing sunglasses - and retailers are scrambling to respond.

Nobody knows how widespread the infections are. Best Buy said it received about two dozen complaints this week after it posted notices on the Web that it sold some infected photo frames over the holidays under its Insignia brand. The frames were infected during manufacturing. One line, the 10.4-inch frame, has been discontinued.


For the entire article: Malware's new infection route: photo frames by Deborah Gage, Chronicle Staff Writer

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#2 Orange Blossom

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 12:21 AM

Good grief.

I'm surprised that the article did not suggest disabling autorun/autoplay and scanning the devices after they are plugged in before allowing them to run.

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#3 quietman7

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 08:26 AM

Keeping Autorun enabled on USB and other removable drives has become a significant security risk due to the increasing number of malware variants that can infect them and transfer the infection to your computer. Read Danger USB! Worm targets removable memory sticks.

I recommend disabling the Autorun feature on USB and removable drives (especially an external drive used for backup) as a method of prevention.

The easiest way to disable Autorun on a specific drive is to download and use Tweak UI PowerToy.
  • After installation, launch Tweak UI, double-click on My Computer in the tree menu on the left, then click on AutoPlay > Drives. This will allow you to change the system settings for AutoPlay/autorun.
  • Uncheck the drives you want to disable AutoPlay on and click on Apply.
  • Next, click on the Types in the left tree. This allows you to control whether Autoplay is enabled for CD and DVD drives and removable drives. You may need to restart Tweak UI if it closes after step 2.
  • Uncheck the box to disable Autoplay for a particular type of drive.
  • Click Apply.
See "Disable Autorun/AutoPlay" for instructions with screenshots.
When Autorun is disabled, double-clicking a drive which has autorun.inf in its root directory may still activate Autorun so be careful.

Always scan USB Flash Drives after they have been used in other computer systems, even your own. An easy way to do this is to download "ClamWin Portable", install it on your USB Flash Drive, update its definition files and perform a scan.

Another prevention measure you can use is to download Symantec's NoScript utility. Scroll down to the section "How to disable (or re-enable) the Windows Scripting Host" to find the link and follow the instructions. Noscript will disable the Windows Scripting Host and prevent VBScripts from running on your machine until you run the utility again.
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#4 Garric

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 01:03 PM

geez... you can't even by some simple digital photo frames anymore without suffering malware. That's ridiculous... Next thing you know, my refrigerator will get a virus.. my watch... my microwave... I guess it is just one of the things we will have to suffer as computers and computerized products take over more of the world.




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