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Core.cache.dsk/powered By Zedo Malware Corruption


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#1 dmndmaker

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 11:47 PM

Greetings!

Ran through you steps for self before posting.. ran all the following:

cleanmgr
Ad-ware 2007
Spybot Search adn Destroy
Housecall Anti-Virus (could not clean TROJ-DLOADER.CSZ)
Panda Anti-Virus ( ran, but no help as it costs money to cure found problems?? found 2 hijacker/root)
Bit Defender
McAfee Stinger (though could not find an update - console says out of date)
Intalled Sygate Personal Firewall
Updated all Windows components

Downloaded Hikackthis - this is my first problem. While scanning, interrutped with a memory error "The instruction at "0x7c9106c3" referenced memory at "0x7c9f4302". The memory could not be "written".

I cannot get a Hijack logfile to help us out here.. any ideas?? Tried unistalling and re-installing Hijackthis, to no avail.

These pop-ups are driving me crazy, I'm usually pretty good with both getting rid of this stuff, adn preventing them in the first place.

Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Todd

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 11:15 AM

One or more of the identified infections is related to a nasty rootkit componet. Rootkits are very dangerous because they use advanced techniques as a means of accessing a computer system that bypasses security mechanisms and steal sensitive information which they send back to the hacker. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. Remote attackers use backdoor Trojans and rootkits as part of an exploit to to gain unauthorized access to a computer and take control of it without your knowledge.

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, you should immediately disconnect from the Internet until your system is cleaned. All passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed by using a different computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach.

Although the rootkit has been identified and may be removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume that because the rootkit has been removed the computer is now secure. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read "When should I re-format?" and "Reformatting the computer or troubleshooting; which is best?".

Should you decide not to follow that advice, we will do our best to help clean the computer of any infections but we cannot guarantee it to be trustworthy or that the removal will be successful. Let me know how you wish to proceed.
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#3 dmndmaker

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 03:34 PM

Thank you so much for the timely wisdom, and warning. As it turns out, you feelings are sage advice - it just so happens that I have been going through the the process of securing my current bank account and re-opening, as a suspicious event happened and both the bank and I felt my secure infomration had been compromised somehow. It seemed like overkill, being prompted be a untraceable .01 deposit electronically into my account, but I imagine the worse was yet to come.. the deposit was on the same day as the initial infection.

If this had not happened in conjuction, I would probably try to get by with repair. As it stands, and after reviewing the links you posted, I feel the only solution is a reformat.. something I am not looking forward to.

Do appreciate the help, and I know this isn't the forum for this type of question, but thought I would throw it out anyway.. when I set up my computer hard drive, I did so with two partititions, and for the most part data is stored on the d: drive.. do I have any hope of being "securely secure" if I only re-format the c:, where the OS lies, and re-installing there?

I will be able to muck through this on my own, I am sure, but any other nuggets you could drop would be much appreciated.

Thanks again for your help.

#4 quietman7

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 05:46 PM

Your welcome.

That's the decision I would have made if this were my system.

Some types of malware can result in a system so badly damaged that a Repair Install will NOT help!. Reinstalling Windows without first wiping the entire hard drive with a repartition and/or format will not remove the infection. The reinstall will only overwrite the Windows files. Any malware on the system will still be there afterwards. Starting over, reformatting the drive and performing a clean install of the OS removes everything and is the safest action.

In case you need help with this, please review the following links:
"How to partition and format a hard disk in Windows XP"
"How do I reinstall and reformat Windows XP on my hard drive?"

These links include step by step instructions:
"Reformat & Clean Install Windows".
"Clean Install Windows XP".
"XP Clean Install (Interactive Setup)".

Reformatting a hard disk deletes all data. You should back up all your important documents, data files and photos. You should not backup any .exe files because they may be infected. Save your files to a CD. After reformatting, as a precaution, make sure you scan these files with your anti-virus prior to copying them back to your hard drive. Don't forget you will have to update your system and apply all Windows security patches.

Also see "How to keep your Windows XP activation after clean install".

If you need additional assistance, you can start a new topic in the Windows XP Home and Professional forum.
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