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Scanning A Document To Vista For Editing


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#1 chrisw52

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 09:28 PM

Whenever I scan a document or text from a multi-funtion printer to the computer in order to edit it,it goes into Windows Photo Gallery as a jpg file.I'm not super capable on the computer and I can not get the scanned text to move somewhere to edit.Tried dragging it to Wordpad and Notepad,but when it opens it just looks like chicken scratches,it will go to Paint,and come up as a recognizable image,but I'm still unable to edit the text.I seem to spend hours going around in circles.Fortunately,my window doesn't open so I still have the computer,Vista and all.Can anybody help? Thank you. Chris

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#2 groovicus

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 09:52 PM

When you scan an image, the entire thing becomes an image. There is no text in the image.... there is a picture of text. As far as the computer is concerned, there is no text. If you want to change text in an image, you need decent graphics software and manually remove the colors, lines, and squiggles that represent text.

#3 Mr Alpha

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 07:40 AM

As groovicus said, it is not text but an image of text. That is all you get when when you scan a paper with text. But there is a solution! OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software, which tries to read the text from the picture. I use ABBYY FineReader OCR, but is costs hundreds of dollars. Sadly, I do not know of any freeware OCR software. You often get a copy of some OCR software with your scanner, you might want to check that.
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#4 EwenB

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 07:22 PM

If you have Microsoft Office you can access Document Scanning in Microsoft Office Tools in the Start Menu. You may have to install it first from your installation discs. The resultant scan can be saved to Word and it can be edited. Read the help file and you will find that pictures in the scan can also be included.

#5 groovicus

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 07:58 PM

The resultant scan can be saved to Word and it can be edited


So you are trying to tell us that text in an image can be edited in a word processor? <_<Get real Word Processors can not edit images. Images may contain images of text, but it is still an image. :huh:

OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software, which tries to read the text from the picture.

It might read the text, but it still can not edit the text. How well does it work if there is not a lot of contrast between the letters and the background, because it is a computers inability to differentiate between text and images that is the foundation of captcha.

#6 Mr Alpha

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 05:37 AM

It might read the text, but it still can not edit the text.

Not the text while it is in the picture, but, and I think this was EwenB's point as well, when you have the text you can save it as a .doc file or similar, which you can edit. If the formatting isn't too complicated it can usually give you that as well.

How well does it work if there is not a lot of contrast between the letters and the background, because it is a computers inability to differentiate between text and images that is the foundation of captcha.

There has been great improvements in OCR technology over the last few years. I believe Steve Gibson called the OCRing of printed text a solved problem. I wouldn't go that far, there are still some remaining issues, but it is nearly perfect. It has gotten so far that many of the CAPTACHs out there are solvable by computers, often because they were made by programmers who don't understand the strength and weaknesses of modern OCR algorithms. There was a story a while back about how scalpers were beating Ticketmaster's CAPTCHA. There are still unbreakable CAPTACHs out there, Google's being one.
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#7 retexan599

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 12:30 PM

If you have Microsoft Office you can access Document Scanning in Microsoft Office Tools in the Start Menu. You may have to install it first from your installation discs. The resultant scan can be saved to Word and it can be edited. Read the help file and you will find that pictures in the scan can also be included.


Somewhat more specifically -- in MS Office, the OCR function is built in to Microsoft Office Document Imaging. I have used it quite often and it is 'pretty good', at least for my simple purposes.




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