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Ram Question ?


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#1 Jove

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 10:30 PM

I need to know something about my RAM, . . .

I would like to know for the Chit and Chat of it , . . If I am moving files around, say to my External HD, CD, and or from desk top to my docs or from the internet to my desk top, . . am I using RAM in a way that it is being used up in the context that my PC's memory needs to know where those files are, etc. ?

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#2 rongchaua

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 08:57 AM

When you are moving your files around, you are using of course RAM. It's easy to test that. Just copy many big files as the same time you'll see your ram will be used 100%.

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#3 Jove

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 09:42 AM

I realize I should be reading up on this but that's why I posted here.

But what I wanted to know was the association with low memory, when the memory is accessed by the machine to perform certain functions, . . . functions are created each time you use the machine, . . then if the functions are reapetious, the memory is not as large but functions such as need be accessed for example; ten files in my documents opposed to 100 files in my documents is the ram effected in a way that it is deprived of power, when there are more functions stored in the memory banks ?

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#4 Jove

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 11:01 AM

According to the Editors of Time-Life Books, Understanding Computers, . . .

" In reviewing some material concerning the memory storage etc.The Cpu relies on information and instructions stored away in in two types of computer memory, ROM, or read only memory, and RAM, or random-access memory, (Ram is also sometimes referred to as, (read and write memory). ROM's contents are permanent and remain intact even when the machine is off. The information in RAM, can be changed at will- as when a new program is loaded into the machine from external storage.-and erased when the power is turned off.When external information comes into the computer through the input ports, it travels along the buses to the CPU,which stores the data in the RAM. Later the CPU may retrieve the data according to directions stored in memory. "

One question I have here is when it does retrieve that data, is that data an imprint or does it actually take that data, freeing up memory on or in the RAM ?

Edited by Jove, 24 January 2008 - 11:22 AM.

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#5 jgweed

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 11:21 AM

File locations on your hard drive are handled by a lookup table within the disk management system. Unless you reference a file (for example, call up My Pictures and click on a jpeg for viewing) RAM is not really effected; moving the data to the screen "bucket" and calling up an application to show it is what takes up RAM.
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#6 Jove

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 01:06 PM

OK, Thanks John,


Would this include for example this forum page, and its graphic contents, etc. and when it does, or, in the case you described what association does that have with the RAM storage, as in, . . .

" The CPU relies on information and instructions stored away in in two types of computer memory, ROM, or read only memory, and RAM" , and regarding the following;

This potential energy in the form of data that is stored on the RAM and is used to call up the Picture that you referred
to , . . if this stored information, or data, and is used to perform that operation, what happens to it after it is used, does it remain as stored data on the RAM to be used again ?


You don't have to use a technical detail a simple explanation will suffice, if it's available.

Edited by Jove, 24 January 2008 - 01:09 PM.

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#7 Animal

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 02:51 PM

Take a look at How Virtual Memory Works @ HowStuffWorks.com Start with the Virtual Memory section and also the related links as well. They explain what RAM does pretty well. That should give you a better idea. Hope that helps.

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#8 Jove

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 09:51 PM

OH-Key- Doky !

Thk.-U

Edited by Jove, 24 January 2008 - 09:52 PM.

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