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7 replies to this topic

#1 Nita

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 07:01 AM

I have windows98SE and IE6 and finally managed , after several abortive attempts, to replace my original 128 RAM with 2 ?sticks, chips? of 256 RAM.Most of the time things arre fine but there is now a cwertain amount of instability and I get lots of error messages which seem to be connected to Explorer and Iexplorer
they come one after another and the result is that I have to shutdown and restart. It is a nuisance. Any ideas?

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#2 Herk

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 12:39 PM

Let me start with the usual cautions:
First, you can destroy virtually any part of a computer with electrostatic electricity.
This is very important, ignore the rant if you followed careful procedures.
You must discharge any latent electricity in your body before handling electronic parts. The best way to do this is to wear a grounding wrist strap available at most any electronics store. Failing that, at least touch a metal part on your case before removing memory (or other components) from their protective packaging. Damage to a component can be partial or total. It only takes about 30 volts to kill electronics and you can easily put out 30,000 if you aren't careful about discharging it first.

Next, did you check your motherboard manual for type of memory and placement? Some motherboards require that memory be put in specific banks or slots. And the type of memory has to match what the motherboard can handle. Sometimes, a motherboard has a maximum allowed amount of memory, for instance.

Did you unplug power from the case before working on it? AT computers are off when the power's off, but ATX computers remain "hot" even when turned off since the power supply is controlled from the motherboard.

Some motherboards require that you "tell" the computer that you've changed the memory configuration. This means going into the BIOS or setup and checking the memory settings. Sometimes, all that's required is to save the current configuration that's already identified the memory. Your type of setup may vary.

Finally, memory may not be seated correctly, or the edge may need cleaning. Do not use solvents because they may affect the chip. Use a clean cloth to wipe the edges, and remember to follow all the previous warnings about safe handling.

Memory problems can be hard to diagnose. Let us know if any of this helped, and good luck.

#3 twinsdad

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 12:58 PM

Herk: I appreciate your well written post above. I've got a 6 year-old Compaq running W98SE. I've ventured into the tower to replace the CD/RW drive and to do some gentle removal of dust-bunnies. I've followed Nita's threads about this issue (with sympathy) and I don't ever want to find myself forced to mess around in BIOS or other scary places especially at a time when I'd likely be unable to easily connect with BC for help. Would you semi-agree that adding RAM is maybe something best left to a professional or other trusted expert?
"Love to eat them mousies, mousies what I like to eat; bite they little heads off, nibble on they tiny feet". B. Kliban

#4 Herk

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 01:42 PM

Herk: Would you semi-agree that adding RAM is maybe something best left to a professional or other trusted expert?

Actually, following some guidelines, replacing RAM isn't all that hard. If tools just don't fit your hand, perhaps you should stimulate your local economy and help feed a starving techie. Sometimes, a memory replacement is a simple operation. But the static electricity thing applies to all parts, including things like CD-Rom drives with exposed circuit boards or pins, or hard drives. Poorly-seated memory isn't uncommon. Damaged slots aren't uncommon either, and you don't want to ever try to force anything into place. Most DIMM-style slots have locks/ejectors on them and you can usually tell that they're in all the way. But anyone who's built several computers can tell you that anybody can and will make mistakes.

#5 twinsdad

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 02:19 PM

Herk: Thanks for the advice.
"Love to eat them mousies, mousies what I like to eat; bite they little heads off, nibble on they tiny feet". B. Kliban

#6 Nita

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 02:19 PM

Thanks, but I have (or rather a good friend has ) installed the new memory. It is the right kind .Everything is now working fine but..as I said I do get unexpected error messages, not all the time, but enough to be a bit of a nuisance they seem to be associated with explorer and Iexplorer.As soon as I get another one I will post the details here.

#7 Nita

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Posted 05 March 2005 - 03:57 AM

I was looking at the google ads on this post for programmes dealing with errors. Does anyone know anything about pcbugdoctor ?

#8 Leurgy

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Posted 05 March 2005 - 07:44 AM

Hi nita

I did some checking and that pc bug doctor seems to be associated with Spyware Snooper which is a program known to give false positives. I didn't download the program but I would imagine it will find about 2376 things wrong with your computer and you can get them all fixed for $49.95. I wouldn't give them any money.

You can perform the same tasks yourself. Try running Ccleaner first. At this moment the website is down for overusing their bandwith but will be back up soon. Also do a scandisk and defrag. There is not much point in defragging until you run Ccleaner.

You mention Iexplorer errors. Iexplore and Iexplorer are two very different things. If you get the error again can you write down the info and post it here?

Edited by Leurgy, 05 March 2005 - 08:06 AM.

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