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Indt2.sys


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5 replies to this topic

#1 icy_bliss_magic

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 12:37 AM

i have posted before but this time the methods i used to rid my usual adware/spam,etc does not seem to be working.

it appears to reappear after every time i run my antispyware scan

the file is

indt2.sys

i dont know how to get rid of it and it is becoming quite a nuisance on my internet usage/access.

please help

Edited by rigel, 16 January 2008 - 09:14 PM.
mod edit - moved to a more appropriate forum ~ rigel


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#2 Orange Blossom

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 12:45 PM

Does it give the file path for that file? If so, please post the file path in your next reply.

From my research, that file is either a rootkit or a legitimate windows file: the location is key to determining which.

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#3 icy_bliss_magic

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 04:48 PM

i know for a fact that its a rootkit because it causes my computer to play random soundclips (most likely from illegitimate access to the internet.)

also sometimes my firefox abruptly closes (when a new tab opens)

first time it happened on mcafee site advisor.
second time it happened when i wanted to read an old thread of mine

#4 quietman7

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 11:06 PM

Rootkits are very dangerous because they use advanced techniques as a means of accessing a computer system that bypasses security mechanisms and steal sensitive information which they send back to the hacker. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. Remote attackers use backdoor Trojans and rootkits as part of an exploit to to gain unauthorized access to a computer and take control of it without your knowledge.

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, you should immediately disconnect from the Internet until your system is cleaned. All passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed by using a different computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach.

Although the rootkit has been identified and may be removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume that because the rootkit has been removed the computer is now secure. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read "When should I re-format?" and "Reformatting the computer or troubleshooting; which is best?".
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#5 icy_bliss_magic

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 12:21 AM

although i havent done any banking on my computer (luckily) i feel as if i should at least try to rid of them before fully considering reinstalling my os.

i think my first option is to try and fix it before going ahead and totally restarting my system

#6 quietman7

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 08:25 AM

You still have not provided the full file path where Indt2.sys is located as Orange Blossom asked you to do. Its probably going to be located in your C:\WINDOWS\system32\ folder.

Also what program is detecting this file?

Please download ATF Cleaner by Atribune & save it to your desktop.
  • Double-click ATF-Cleaner.exe to run the program.
  • Under Main "Select Files to Delete" choose: Select All.
  • Click the Empty Selected button.
  • If you use Firefox browser click Firefox at the top and choose: Select All
  • Click the Empty Selected button.
    NOTE: If you would like to keep your saved passwords, please click No at the prompt.
  • If you use Opera browser click Opera at the top and choose: Select All
  • Click the Empty Selected button.
    NOTE: If you would like to keep your saved passwords, please click No at the prompt.
  • Click Exit on the Main menu to close the program.
Please download AVG Anti-Rootkit and save to your desktop
  • Double click avgarkt-setup-1.1.0.42.exe to install. By default it will install to C:\Program Files\GRISOFT\AVG Anti-Rootkit
  • Accept the license and follow the prompts to install.
  • You will be asked to reboot to finish the installation so click "Finish".
  • After rebooting, double-click the icon for AVG Anti-Rootkit on your desktop.
  • You will see a window with four buttons at the bottom.
  • Click "Search For Rootkits" and the scan will begin.
  • You will see the progress bar moving from left to right. The scan will take some so be patient and let it finish.
  • When the scan has finished, a small window will open so you can view the results.
  • Right click and select "Save Result To File".
  • By default the file will be saved with a .csv extension. (You can use notepad to open the .cvs file)
  • Copy and paste the results in your next reply.
  • If anything was found, click "Remove selected items"
  • If nothing was found, please click the "Perform in-depth Search" saving anything found to file as before.
Note: Close all open windows, programs, and DO NOT USE the computer while scanning. If the scan is performed while the computer is in use, false positives may appear in the scan results. This is caused by files or registry entries being deleted automatically.
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