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Illegal Operation


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#1 Shoban Sen

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 11:20 PM

Lately, while surfing the Net, I am experiencing a small inconvenience. Sometimes (probably when I click on something), I suddenly see that dreaded Window, "This program has performed an illegal operation and will be shutdown". When I click on the Details button, it says, "DDHELP caused an invalid page fault in module <unknown> at ...". When I click on the Close button, nothing happens. When I click on Close a seond time, the Window closes but the program (AOL) does not close, and I can keep on surfing as if nothing had happened! Just a small inconvenience, but I wonder why?

If somebody can suggest any easy fix, I shall try that. Otherwise, I can live with this small inconvenience. By the way, my OS is Windows98 and I use AOL 7.0
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

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#2 TexasAngel67

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 11:46 PM

Shoban,
Take a look at this.
And check this as well. I saw this and I'm wondering if the DD of the DDHELP stands for Disk Defragmenter. It would also be helpful to know what comes after

DDHELP caused an invalid page fault in module <unknown> at...


that. Do you recall what comes after the 'at'?

Post back with any results.

#3 Shoban Sen

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Posted 03 March 2005 - 12:16 AM

I'll get back to you on this later. DD stands for DirectDraw. And after that "at" there is a long address. Do you REALLY need to see it? I have so far taken a look at your first link only. I don't even have any games in my computer.

As I said, it is like a false alarm. The program does not close when I click on Close. With two clicks the Illegal Operation Window closes. Life goes on. ;-)

It is past midnight here. I have to go to bed now. Goodnight.
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

#4 TexasAngel67

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Posted 03 March 2005 - 12:29 AM

I am not familiar with this so I did some research. This is what I found:

DirectDraw 7.0
About DirectDraw
DirectDraw is the component of the DirectX application programming interface (API) that allows you to directly manipulate display memory, the hardware blitter, hardware overlay support, and flipping surface support. DirectDraw provides this functionality while maintaining compatibility with existing Microsoft Windows-based applications and device drivers.

DirectDraw is a software interface that provides direct access to display devices while maintaining compatibility with the Windows graphics device interface (GDI). It is not a high-level application programming interface (API) for graphics. DirectDraw provides a device-independent way for games and Windows subsystem software, such as three-dimensional (3-D) graphics packages and digital video codecs, to gain access to the features of specific display devices.

DirectDraw works with a wide variety of display hardware, ranging from simple SVGA monitors to advanced hardware implementations that provide clipping, stretching, and non-RGB color format support. The interface is designed so that your applications can enumerate the capabilities of the underlying hardware and then use any supported hardware-accelerated features. Features that are not implemented in hardware are emulated by DirectX.

DirectDraw provides device-dependent access to display memory in a device-independent way. Essentially, DirectDraw manages display memory. Your application need only recognize some basic device dependencies that are standard across hardware implementations, such as RGB and YUV color formats and the pitch between raster lines. You need not call specific procedures to use the blitter or manipulate palette registers. Using DirectDraw, you can manipulate display memory with ease, taking full advantage of the blitting and color decompression capabilities of different types of display hardware without becoming dependent on a particular piece of hardware.

DirectDraw provides excellent game graphics on computers running Windows 95 and later and Windows NT version 4.0 or Windows 2000.


I might be going out on a limb here but the problem seems to be with DirectX. If you read the links I mentioned prior and this Quote, that's what I took from them anyway. I'll let someone else more knowledgeable with this to take over.

Hope the information is helpful and provides input, nonetheless.

~67~

#5 Shoban Sen

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Posted 05 March 2005 - 05:05 PM

Okay, TexasAngel67 or whoever is interested in researching on this topic. Here are the details of what comes after "at" :

DDHELP caused an invalid page fault in
module <unknown> at 0000:89142444.
Registers:
EAX=00000001 CS=0177 EIP=89142444 EFLGS=00010293
EBX=819b2384 SS=017f ESP=0063f4d4 EBP=0063f4e4
ECX=c17a6e90 DS=017f ESI=83f13000 FS=478f
EDX=c00300f8 ES=017f EDI=00000000 GS=0000
Bytes at CS:EIP:

Stack dump:
00000000 83f13000 819b2384 00000001 0063f6ac bff7ddcd 83f13000 00000001 00000000 00000000 83f13000 819b2384 819b2340 819b95bc 819b95d0 c17a6e90


Does the above give a clue how to resolve the problem? Anybody?
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...




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