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Linux Distros, Dv6500


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#1 KIDRoach

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 06:24 PM

Hi,


Recently, I decided to feed my interests in Linux, and researched about it. I took the test in the sticky, and found out that I'm most suitable with these Distros.

Open Suse
Ubuntu, Kubuntu
Mandriva

Now, I tried Ubuntu, as it seems like it's the easiest out of the three to use, most user/beginner friendly. However, it didn't work out.

My laptop is a HP Pavillion dv6500. It seems like Ubuntu has been experiencing a lot of problems with this kind of laptop. In the 7.04 release, it wouldn't even install. In the 7.10 it improved, but there's no sound. I tried the alternative, Kubuntu, but came to no avail. It wouldn't install, saying that there's something wrong with my I/O device.

So it came down to these two, Open Suse or Mandriva.
Just an advice would do, and why it's more suitable. :thumbsup:

I'm a college student so I'm not looking for anything too high-tech. My knowledge is also not too good about computers, and definitely nothing about Linux.
My laptop is pretty good in its specification, IMHO. It's got a Core 2 Duo T7700, which has a clock speed of 2.4 GHz. Not bad for a laptop. It's got a 2GB of RAM, with a graphic card 8400 GS nVidia.

I learned a little of HTML but I doubt it would help me with learning Linux, or would it? Not much other programming background though. Just a little in matlab, and currently learning a little about Python.

Any advice on which is better to use?


Thanks :trumpet:

Edit: Another thing that I might add, since it's pretty important.

I'm going to need to dual boot with Vista, since I'm gonna be using it in college. I have an empty partition in my hard drive already, from the Ubuntu installation, which I already emptied. Also, if do any of the two support DHCP? My internet connection in campus uses this and ubuntu supported it. It's just that if Open Suse or Mandriva doesn't support it, it's gonna be quite a lot of hassle. :flowers:

Edited by KIDRoach, 06 January 2008 - 06:27 PM.

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#2 madman6510

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 06:36 PM

From my experience, I think OpenSUSE would be a better choice. It is fairly simple, but has enough advanced features to keep experienced people interested. Link. I doubt HTML will be of much use in learning Linux, but Python is a good choice.

And yes, both support DCHP.

#3 KIDRoach

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 10:07 PM

I just googled and researched a little about Open Suse. Are you sure it can dual boot with Vista?

I read that there are some problems with it dual booting with Vista. Is there like a guide or something in the internet? I googled for it, couldn't find any :thumbsup:
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#4 madman6510

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 11:09 PM

As long as you install Vista first, and do the partitioning in the OpenSUSE installer right, you should be able to dual boot no problem.

As for the guide, it's pretty easy.

1. Check how big your C: drive is, and how much space is taken up. Remember it.
2. Install Vista (unless you already have it installed, then skip this step).
3. Put the OpenSUSE disk in the drive and reboot.
4. When the installer boots, follow the instructions to the "Installation Settings" screen.
5. At that screen, click on "Partitioning", then select "Create custom partition setup" then "custom partitioning".
6. When you get to the partitioning screen, resize the Vista partition (it should be the only partition there, unless you did something to the partitioning of the drive). Leave enough space so that the current data (remember those numbers?) can still fit on the drive, but there is enough space to install Linux. 20GB is a good amount of space to give OpenSUSE.
7. Select the free space you just cleared up, and make a new partition. Make the partition take up most of the space you cleared out, but not all of it (leave about 2GB, we'll be making another partition later). Format it as ext3, with the mount point as /.
8. Now, select the remaining free space. Make a new partition that takes up the rest of the free space, and format it as "swap" with the mount point as swap too. (It might be greyed out, as swap is the only real mount point for that formatting).
9. Save the partitioning settings, and continue the installation.
10. When you finally finish the installation, there should be a selection on the boot menu such as "windows 1". You can rename it as Vista, but it's not important.

If something goes wrong, and windows doesn't appear on the boot loader, then download a MS-DOS boot disk (www.bootdisk.com), boot to it with a floppy, and type "FDISK /MBR" at the prompt to replace the GRUB bootloader with the default windows bootloader.

I'm installing OpenSUSE as well (WinXP dual boot), so I should be able to give some clarification on the guide in a bit.

Edited by madman6510, 06 January 2008 - 11:40 PM.


#5 KIDRoach

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 11:43 PM

I already have an empty space[A block of unallocated space that I emptied to install Ubuntu] Should I extend my vista partition again, and then let Suse do the partitioning?

Another thing, if something went wrong and the Windows wouldn't boot, is there any way to boot the fdisk from a cd instead of a floppy disk? My laptop doesn't have a floppy drive :thumbsup:

Edit: Also, a quick question. I downloaded the live cd, both the GNOME and KDE. Tried it, but neither of the CD seemed to work. Is it just me, or is there something wrong with the LiveCD? :flowers:

However, I also downloaded the installer and it asked me to install Suse rightaway.

Edited by KIDRoach, 06 January 2008 - 11:47 PM.

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#6 madman6510

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 12:02 AM

If you already have free space or linux partitions, you can just use those. Reformat the main (non-vista) partition with ext3, and set it as /. Leave the swap as swap. If it's just empty space, then you'll need to partition it out, you just won't have to resize the vista partition.

As for the boot disk, I found a CD version of the boot disk here.

How did the live CDs not work? Did they just not boot to the disk, or did they fail during the loading process?

#7 KIDRoach

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:41 AM

Well, I dl-ed both the live CDs, burned in on a rewritable CD. Then, when I try exploring the CD from My Computer, I couldn't see anything. Or is that normal? I didn't try booting from the CD though. It says that the CD is corrupt/unreadable. I've tried downloading the GNOME, KDE, redownloading it again, re-burning it again. No avail :thumbsup:

And, this might sound like a stupid question but I didn't find a boot disk for Vista in that link. I used the EasyBCD freeware to rewrite the Vista MBR, when I uninstalled Ubuntu. Can I install EasyBCD in the OpenSuse environment, and then rewrite the MBR for Vista?

Thanks

Edited by KIDRoach, 07 January 2008 - 11:10 AM.

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#8 KIDRoach

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 02:05 PM

I've decided to take the plunge, installed OpenSuse :thumbsup:


In the end, I realized that you can't access the live CD in Windows Environment, so I reboot, and then I boot from the CD, into OpenSuse. I ended up installing OpenSuse without a boot-loader, neither LILO, nor GRUB. I've heard problems going on with OpenSuse's GRUB, saying that you wouldn't be able to get back into Vista. I thought this would make sure that the OpenSuse wouldn't rewrite the Vista's MBR. Sure enough, it didn't :trumpet:

However, I tried looking for ways to boot into OpenSuse, but I couldn't find any. I tried doing the same way I did with Ubuntu, using EasyBCD, find the partition in which OpenSuse was installed. Then, I ticked the box where it says GRUB isn't installed in the boot-sector. Rebooted. The vista boot selector still wouldn't let me boot into OpenSuse. I ended up having a text-based GRUB. I didn't know what to type so I hard-rebooted my laptop, got back to Vista. :flowers:

Any advice on how I should map out OpenSuse into my boot?
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#9 madman6510

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 06:05 PM

Boot to the live CD (KDE) you got, and when you get to the desktop, click on the lizard, then computer, then open YaST. Click on system, then boot loader. If asked, install GRUB. Then add a new option. Select chainloader section, and set these options: Section name: Vista. Check "do not verify filesystem before booting". Set block offset to 1. Set "other system" to your windows drive (probably /dev/sda1).

Edited by madman6510, 07 January 2008 - 06:34 PM.


#10 KIDRoach

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 11:36 PM

In the end, I reinstalled the OpenSuse again, booted up from GRUB, got into OpenSuse.

I ran into the same problem I did with Ubuntu. There's no sound. :trumpet:

I guess Linux is just not for me yet. :thumbsup: Will try again later when they do update the sound :D Thanks for all the help :flowers:
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#11 joe883

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 12:01 AM

I tried Suse also and I also have no sound. I tried the same disc
on both of my computers but the speaker icon is xed out.

#12 KIDRoach

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 03:45 PM

I guess it just doesn't feel right when I can't do something that I thought I could. I researched throughout the web, the ubuntu forums and the internet basically, with google. Managed to find something to fix the sound :flowers: I found one for ubuntu though, while browsing the internet and the ubuntu forums. :trumpet:

Just follow the directions :cool:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HdaIntelSoundHowto

I just thought you guys might wanna know, given the amount of HP users out there :inlove:
apt-get install build-essential ncurses-dev gettext
apt-get install linux-headers-`uname -r`

wget ftp://ftp.alsa-project.org/pub/driver/alsa-driver-1.0.15.tar.bz2
wget ftp://ftp.alsa-project.org/pub/lib/alsa-lib-1.0.15.tar.bz2
wget ftp://ftp.alsa-project.org/pub/utils/alsa-utils-1.0.15.tar.bz2

tar -xjf alsa-driver*.tar.bz2
tar -xjf alsa-lib*.tar.bz2
tar -xjf alsa-utils*.tar.bz2
rm alsa*.tar.bz2

mkdir -p /usr/src/alsa
mv alsa-* /usr/src/alsa

cd /usr/src/alsa/alsa-driver*
./configure --with-cards=hda-intel
make
make install

cd /usr/src/alsa/alsa-lib*
./configure
make
make install

cd /usr/src/alsa/alsa-utils*
./configure
make
make install
These are the commands that I executed and followed... Although, there might be some parts where you need to type "sudo", without the quote, in front of the codes, to grant you the root privilege.

Credit goes to this guy creating the script :thumbsup:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=577699&page=2

Edited by KIDRoach, 09 January 2008 - 03:46 PM.

If Quizzes were Quizzicles, what are Tests ?




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