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Sparks Behind Computer


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25 replies to this topic

#1 alpadilla

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 11:04 AM

HP Pavilion/ ME

My daughters' computer ... It was on ... she moved the extension cord/ surge protector and sparks were seen behind the computer and it immediately shut off.

I replaced power cord and surge protector, but it will not turn on. What should I try?


I looked thru pgs of tutorials and many pages of a search results to no avail.

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#2 DEC_42

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 11:19 AM

Hmm, there could be a number of reasons behind this. First of all, replacing a power cord does virtually nothing. Go to a computer shop and ask them to change the power supply. Surges and things like these can seriously damage them. There also may be a chance other hardware components are fried, as well.


Also, no offense, but who still uses WinME?

#3 alpadilla

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 12:54 PM

Who uses them?

KIDS ... who you don't want on YOUR system. They can play their educational games, type papers/ homework, use kid sites like adoptme.com and starfall.com and if they cook it -- it will have NO impact on your productivity at work!

Keeping them on it, keeps them off mine!

#4 boopme

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 01:40 PM

Hello alpadilla and welcome.
This probably your power supply. I'm going to move this topic to the Internal Hardware forum. There the Advisors will see it and post some helpful replies.
Kindly post back the Model number of the HP and they will be able to give better advice.
It is not to difficult or expensive an item to replace.

Internal Hardware

Edited by boopme, 31 December 2007 - 01:42 PM.

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#5 hamluis

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 03:27 PM

Since you seem to have at least two computers (hoping they are both desktops), I suggest taking a power supply from the Known Good System...and temporarily connecting it to the Problem System (connecting everything properly).

Then let's see if that system will boot.

Another thing I thought of...did you check the on/off switch for the PS currently in the system? Some (at least mine) automatically shut off when something like what you described occurs. When the owner/user tries to reboot, unless he/she has reset the PS switch, it's a nogo.

Louis

#6 alpadilla

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 08:15 PM

This is what I see on the front of the tower:

733 MHz Intel Celeron Processor
64 MB SDRam
20GB Ultra DMA harddrive

XE744 is on a bubble below the on/off switch.


On the back is the serial number and lot numbers...


Someone said take power supply from good computer to try on this one... how to do that?

I already tried power cords.


Sorry I had it in the wrong forum ... I tried to search for same subject to find a lead. When I got results, everything was too broad... usually got search error message.

#7 Queen-Evie

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 08:48 PM

Hamluis suggested checking the on/off switch for the power supply. This switch will be on the back of the case, either just above or just below where the power cord plugs into the tower.
Obviously different switch than the one on the front.
Did you check the one on the back? Can't hurt to flip it, then turn on the computer. May or may not work, but at least you tried. (if it doesn't power up the pc, make sure you flip the switch back to where it was)

#8 Sneakycyber

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 09:18 PM

Swapping in the power supply involves removing the good one from your computer. Then connecting it to the problem computer. To remove your power supply from the good computer you will first shut it down and unplug it, next take the side of the computer case off, next unplug all of the connectors coming from the power supply (the big metal box in the top corner of the case) from the Hard drives, CDROM drives, and the motherboard. Next unscrew the power supply and take it to the trouble computer. Unplug the trouble unit and plug in all of the connectors of the known good unit (you don't actually need to screw the power supply in just don't rest it on any of the components inside the case). See if it works. If this all seems daunting a trip to the computer repair store may be a better choice. If you are good with a voltmeter you can check the voltages on the trouble computer using this guide. You will need to ground the green wire to any of the black wires to get the power supply to turn on. Then using the voltmeter check the voltages and make sure they match the ones in the guide.
Chad Mockensturm 
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Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#9 boopme

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 09:22 PM

These should help

Here's your HP's specs
HP -XE744

Power supply information
AC input
90 Watts This should upgrade to maybe 300W
Input Frequency: 50/60 Hz
Voltage: 120V (100-120V) ~ 3A / 0
Voltage: 230V (200 - 240V) ~ 1.5A

Your Motherboard Specs

How To Replace Your Power Supply With pictures

Edited by boopme, 31 December 2007 - 09:24 PM.

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#10 dc3

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 11:34 PM

I would like to add a word of caution regarding removing the PSU from on computer and using it in another. There are computers out there like Dell that use proprietary PSUs that have a different pin configuration which will fry your motherboard if you use it. Make sure that the PSU is a ATX type.

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#11 Eyesee

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 01:01 AM

Lets look again at the system specs before we rush to conclusions!

733 MHz Intel Celeron Processor
64 MB SDRam
20GB Ultra DMA harddrive

Is it worth replacing a power supply for a computer that has these specs?
NOPE!!

Cost you more for the power supply than the system is worth!

Just say hey honey! Remember that allowance that you USED to have?

Edited by Eyesee, 01 January 2008 - 01:04 AM.

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#12 dc3

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 03:28 AM

Lets look again at the system specs before we rush to conclusions!

733 MHz Intel Celeron Processor
64 MB SDRam
20GB Ultra DMA harddrive

Is it worth replacing a power supply for a computer that has these specs?
NOPE!!

Cost you more for the power supply than the system is worth!

Just say hey honey! Remember that allowance that you USED to have?


This computer is for the kids, and you can get a PSU for about twenty bucks.

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#13 alpadilla

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 12:41 AM

Flippin the power switch made no difference ... Thanks everyone for your help!

#14 dc3

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 03:22 AM

There are a couple of things to look at , see if you can smell anything burnt from the grill of the fan on the rear of the PSU, if there is that's a good indication that it's fried. Once you have the case open inspect the motherboard for any smoke or burn marks. It had been suggested that you try exchanging PSUs to see if this is you problem, I think this is the proper thing to do at this point.

If you look at the connectors they are keyed and will only go on one way and will only attach to the units they are intended for so you aren't going to have a problem there. Just remember that every peripheral device, hdd, CD, DVD, Floppy need to be connected to the PSU. You can make a list of connections as you unplug them, this will help you make sure that everything gets plugged back in. If the new PSU has a on/off switch on the rear be sure that this is turned off. Once you have everything reconnected and the case is still open use the switch to turn the PSU on, if you see or hear anything that isn't right turn it back off. If this works then the other PSU was the problem and you will need to purchaser another. If you need help selecting one we can help with this as well. If this doesn't solve the problem then we will go from there.

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#15 alpad

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 05:14 PM

Well, I finally got to my to-do-list and put another PSU in the computer ... now the monitor says "Operating System cannot be found" I disconnected everything and checked out the dern connections and are good.

Could the surge have killed the OS? Do I attempt re-installation or what else might I try? Incidentally, the CD drive doesn't open either.

I may just be over my head with this.




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