Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Installing Cd/dvd Drive Problems


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 kimgeni

kimgeni

  • Members
  • 104 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NO
  • Local time:03:40 AM

Posted 31 December 2007 - 11:02 AM

I connected a second CD/DVD drive to my PC today. For some reason its not working. I entered the system setup to see if I had to turn it on, but I could only find my first drive. They're connected to the same data/ide cable, if that means something.

Anyone who knows what's wrong?

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 rigacci

rigacci

    Fiorentino


  • Members
  • 2,604 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 31 December 2007 - 12:28 PM

Did you set the jumper on the new DVD drive? If the drives are set to Master-Slave, you need to jumper the new one to "Slave".

If the drives are set to CS (Cable Select), then the primary drive needs to be on the end of the cable.

I prefer the Master-Slave setup. Just check the jumpers on each of the drives to make certain they are correct.


Good luck.

DR

#3 Eyesee

Eyesee

    Bleepin Teck Shop


  • BC Advisor
  • 3,540 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In the middle of Kansas
  • Local time:08:40 PM

Posted 31 December 2007 - 12:45 PM

Also make sure that the red stripe on one edge of the IDE cable (pin 1) faces towards the power connector.
If you are looking directly at the back of the drive it would be to the right
In the beginning there was the command line.

#4 kimgeni

kimgeni
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 104 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NO
  • Local time:03:40 AM

Posted 31 December 2007 - 05:15 PM

How do you jump the drives? I didnt set anything to master/slave, (first time I've had 2 drives installed).
Looked it up on Wikipedia. Is it this? Its just a small pin I'll have to move?

Where can I see if they're set to CS? The old drive, which I want as the primary if I must choose, is at the end of the cable. (And working as normal).

"Also make sure that the red stripe on one edge of the IDE cable (pin 1) faces towards the power connector"
Cant say I know what you mean, but I assume I will see it when I opens the computer


Thanks.

#5 rigacci

rigacci

    Fiorentino


  • Members
  • 2,604 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 31 December 2007 - 05:35 PM

Here is a link to the explanation of the jumpers:

http://www.fonerbooks.com/r_cd.htm

There usually is a little diagram on the top of the drive showing you how to place the jumper for each selection. :thumbsup:

DR

#6 Eyesee

Eyesee

    Bleepin Teck Shop


  • BC Advisor
  • 3,540 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In the middle of Kansas
  • Local time:08:40 PM

Posted 31 December 2007 - 06:35 PM

Not only to you have to jumper the drives as master/slave but the IDE cable has to be connected correctly as well.
The cable has a red stripe on one side. Might be really light but it is there.
That red stripe needs to face the white power connector on the back of the cdrom drives in both cases.
Sometimes the IDE cable is keyed and will only fit in the correct way but sometimes not.

See if this helps you
http://www.fonerbooks.com/r_cd.htm
This is for one drive but it shows how to set the jumpers and IDE cable

Edited by Eyesee, 31 December 2007 - 06:39 PM.

In the beginning there was the command line.

#7 kimgeni

kimgeni
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 104 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NO
  • Local time:03:40 AM

Posted 01 January 2008 - 09:01 AM

The first drive was set to CS, so I set the new one to that as well. Now they're both working.
Thanks. :thumbsup:

The drive's only connected with 1 screw, however I dont think its possible to use more. The screw that came with the drive is smaller than the one connected to the olde drive, so perhaps I should use change screw, or doesnt it matter?

#8 DaChew

DaChew

    Visiting Alien


  • BC Advisor
  • 10,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:millenium falcon and rockytop
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 01 January 2008 - 09:15 AM

Copyright 2007 by Morris Rosenthal


eyesee,
that link has some pretty pictures but the guide is quite dated, seems more from 2005 not 2007

the dvd burning community has been universally reccomending 80 conductor cables for over a year

The 40 wire IDE ribbon cable may be keyed to the connector on the CD burner,


and then who uses the analog audio lead anymore?

The first connection to make when you install a CD drive (because it's at the bottom and hardest to get at) is the audio lead for playing music CDs


I guess I am too picky

I hate cable select
Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.

#9 DaChew

DaChew

    Visiting Alien


  • BC Advisor
  • 10,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:millenium falcon and rockytop
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 01 January 2008 - 09:28 AM

To use cable select, both devices on the channel are set to the "cable select" (CS) setting, usually by a special jumper. Then, a special cable is used. This cable is very similar in most respects to the regular IDE/ATA cable, except for the CSEL signal. CSEL is carried on wire #28 of the standard IDE/ATA cable, and is grounded at the host's connector (the one that attaches to the motherboard or controller). On a cable select cable, one of the connectors (the "master connector") has pin #28 connected through to the cable, but the other (the "slave connector") has an open circuit on that pin (no connection). When both drives on the channel are set cable select, here's what happens:

Master: The device that is attached to the "master connector" sees the CSEL signal as grounded, because its connector has pin #28 attached to the cable, and the host's connector has that signal grounded. Seeing the "zero value" (grounded), the device sets itself to operate as master (device 0).
Slave: The drive that is attached to the "slave connector" does not see the CSEL signal as grounded, because its connector is not attached to the CSEL signal on the cable. Seeing this "no connection", the device configures itself as a slave (device 1).
If you switch the devices between the two connectors, they swap configuration, the master becoming the slave and vice-versa. Not a very complicated arrangement, and a good idea, it would seem. In fact, if cable select had actually caught on, it would have been great. The problem is that it has never been widely used, and this lack of universality has made cable select unattractive, which is a bit of a chicken and egg situation. Since cable select was never accepted in the industry, most drives come, by default, with the drive jumpered as a master or single drive. This means that to enable cable select, you have to change a jumper anyway, which obviously negates some of the advantage.

But the biggest reason why cable select never caught on was the cable itself. From the very beginning, all 40-conductor IDE/ATA cables should have been made so that they would work with cable select. There's actually no need to have different cable types, because if you set a drive to "master" or "slave" explicitly, it just ignores the CSEL setting. So a cable select cable can be used either way: regular jumpering or cable select.

Unfortunately, regular 40-conductor IDE/ATA cables don't support cable select. (Why this came about I do not know, but I suspect that some bean counter determined they could save five cents on each PC by doing this.) So to use cable select you need a special cable, and these are of course non-standard, making them a special purchase. Also, many people don't understand cable select, nor do they realize it needs a special cable. If you set both drives to "CS" and then use them on a regular (non-cable-select) IDE cable, both drives will configure themselves as "master", causing a configuration conflict.

Making matters worse, the 40-conductor IDE/ATA cable select cables have the "master connector" as the middle device and the "slave connector" as the device at the end of the cable, farthest from the host. For signaling reasons, it's best to put a single drive at the end of a cable, not put it in the middle leaving a "stub" of wire hanging off the end of the channel. But if you do this, that single drive sets itself as a slave with no master, a technically illegal configuration. Worse, suppose you do this, and your hard disk sets itself as a slave, and the system boots from it without problem, as most would. Then, you decide to add a new hard disk. You set it to cable select and attach it to the middle connector. The new drive then becomes the master, and thus moves ahead of the old drive in precedence! The system will try to boot from it instead of your old drive (which some people might want, but many do not.)


http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCS-c.html

Dell favors cable select on their older systems, more dellhell


I would buy a new cable(standard 80 conductor) ultradma, put the superior drive(dvd burner) on top, jumpered master at end of cable.

Preferably disconnect the old drive(it's just a power waste and an accident waiting to happen

If you must use it connect as slave to the lower connector(towards the middle of the cable)

Remember the long section with blue connects to the motherboard

Edited by DaChew, 01 January 2008 - 09:31 AM.

Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.

#10 Eyesee

Eyesee

    Bleepin Teck Shop


  • BC Advisor
  • 3,540 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In the middle of Kansas
  • Local time:08:40 PM

Posted 01 January 2008 - 07:00 PM

Chewy

It was just an illustration to show where the jumpers are and how the cable connects
Best I could find on short notice

I am glad he got it sorted out
In the beginning there was the command line.

#11 DaChew

DaChew

    Visiting Alien


  • BC Advisor
  • 10,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:millenium falcon and rockytop
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 01 January 2008 - 08:02 PM

The computer memory guide/blog here is one of the best I have ever seen, it would be nice to have one on connecting ide drives, of course they are an endangered species

but then we have sata 1 vs sata 2 cables

:thumbsup:
Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.

#12 kimgeni

kimgeni
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 104 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NO
  • Local time:03:40 AM

Posted 02 January 2008 - 09:12 AM

I would buy a new cable(standard 80 conductor) ultradma, put the superior drive(dvd burner) on top, jumpered master at end of cable.
Preferably disconnect the old drive(it's just a power waste and an accident waiting to happen
If you must use it connect as slave to the lower connector(towards the middle of the cable)
Remember the long section with blue connects to the motherboard


I dont know what kinda cable I've got, does it matter as long as they're both working? Couldnt find any specifications on the cable in the user manual.
What do you mean with "an accident waiting to happen"?

#13 DaChew

DaChew

    Visiting Alien


  • BC Advisor
  • 10,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:millenium falcon and rockytop
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 02 January 2008 - 10:01 AM

Most new optical drives added to an older computer are burners, they take more power to burn faster than older drives.

As a computer ages, parts wear, friction increases and power supplies start to weaken.

Often a new dvd burner or combo drive can be the straw that broke the camel's back, make the load lighter by disconnecting the old drive or upgrade the power supply.

Individual circumstances vary of course, but in most cases the above is true.

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/conf.htm

a picture of an 80 conductor cable

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/conf.htm

notice the difference

new drives need new cables

Edited by DaChew, 02 January 2008 - 10:10 AM.

Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.

#14 kimgeni

kimgeni
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 104 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NO
  • Local time:03:40 AM

Posted 02 January 2008 - 11:44 AM

I've got a grey and not a brown cable, so I guess I've got the new one? (Cant remember the colour of the connectors).

#15 DaChew

DaChew

    Visiting Alien


  • BC Advisor
  • 10,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:millenium falcon and rockytop
  • Local time:09:40 PM

Posted 02 January 2008 - 12:01 PM

all someone ever needs to do is just count the wires once on a 80 conductor and you'll instantly see the difference from then on

it's not only a problem with not having the extra grounds, cables wear out
Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users