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Vista And Xp Machines Won't Share On A Home Network


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#1 jjkkclan

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 08:12 AM

Please help! All I want to do is get my tiny little home network to function.
The problem: my new vista laptop (wireless or wired) is not able to share files on my XP desktop.
The configuration: I have 4 computers in my network. 3 are hard-wired desktops the have communicated with each other happily through a small switch for years—they still do. One of those machines runs XP (Home Edition). The other 2 run Windows Me. I access the Internet through a dial-up connection from the modem in my XP machine. Several folders on each machine allow sharing. I recently purchased a new laptop that came with Windows Vista installed. It has both an Ethernet card and a wireless network card. I could not get the XP and new Vista computers to talk when I connected them together, either through the switch or directly Ethernet to Ethernet (but the lights were on, so I know there was a good connection). So, I went out and got a wireless router [Dlink] (I’d ultimately like a wireless connection anyway). Now the hard-wired computers connect through the hard-wired connections of the wireless router and communicate just fine.
I have tried many different network software configurations on the Windows Vista laptop and XP machines. The closest I come to getting it to work is this: I have turned off DHCP (except for the dial-up connection) and gone to fixed IP addresses on all computers. I have configured the HOSTS file on each machine to have all the names and IP addresses on the network. I have made sure that the File and Printer Sharing service is installed and turned on and all computers have unique names and the same workgroup. The LLTD Responder is installed on the XP machine and Discovery and all the services are turned on for the Vista machine. I have also given the router a fixed IP address. The Vista machine easily finds the wireless network and connects. I can ping the XP machine from the Vista machine using the IP address or the Computer name. I can ping the Vista machine from the XP machine using either the IP address or the Computer name. Windows Network Places on the XP machine can find the Vista laptop only if I use the search function and look for the Vista Computer name. At that point I can open some, but not all of the shared Vista folders (after giving the proper password as a guest). On the Vista machine, the network facilities find the laptop itself and the router quickly and sometimes they find the Windows Me machines, but not the XP machine. Occasionally, if I search specifically for the name of the XP computer, it will be found. However, when I try to view the shared folders, I get a message stating that the Vista computer cannot access the files on the XP computer, because a remote firewall is probably blocking access (that’s the best case scenario) or a message that the Path cannot be found. I have checked Windows Firewall on both computers and they seem to be set correctly to allow file and printer sharing. The Vista machine indicates that its Windows Firewall is set up correctly. I get these error messages even if I turn both firewalls off! I have used the same Vista laptop and router with a different XP desktop and everything worked fine—I don’t have access to that machine to check its setting any more. So, I think some how, some where, I have screwed up the settings on my XP desktop computer, but I can’t see what it might be. I have learned some things about networks and understand some of the basics, but I am really a beginner at this stuff. The computers suggest DNS problems sometimes or the firewall problem, but I’m not sure what to try next. Could I have a hidden firewall I don’t know about? How could I find out? There are advanced firewall settings for each of the network connections; do I have to change/fix those? Should they all be the same? I don’t see how the firewall settings are the problem if I get the same message when they are turned off. Internet connection (though turned on for the dial-up connection) is not working either, but I’m not concerned about that yet. All I want to do is share files and other resources and play locally networked games among all of my computers locally without fighting about it. Does anyone have any ideas?



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#2 Linkman101

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 01:13 AM

Networking home computers running different versions of Windows
In this articleWhat's changed since Windows XP
Make sure all computers are in the same workgroup
Set the network location type to Private
Open ports in your firewall to allow file and printer sharing
Turn on additional file and printer sharing options
Consider using password protected sharing
Using the network map

If you’ve previously set up a home network using computers running Windows XP, you’ll find that setting up a network with a mix of computers running Windows XP and Windows Vista will be similar. There are a few important differences though, and understanding what's different will help you avoid some common problems.

This article also covers the settings needed to set up file and printer sharing on your network.

What's changed since Windows XP
These are the main networking-related differences between Windows XP and Windows Vista:

Feature
Windows XP
Windows Vista

Default workgroup name
MSHOME in Windows XP Home Edition; WORKGROUP in all other versions
WORKGROUP

Shared folder name
Shared Documents
Public

Simple file sharing
Allowed by default
Not allowed by default—access to shared folders, including the Public folder (if shared), requires a user name and password

Detection and access to computers on the network
Only detects and accesses computers in the same workgroup
Detects and accesses all computers on the network, no matter which operating system they're running or which workgroup they belong to

Place to change settings and preferences
My Network Places
Network folder

Network controls
In various places throughout the operating system
Mostly in Network and Sharing Center


But take heart. If you aren’t ready to upgrade all your computers to Windows Vista, you can overcome these differences to get your network running smoothly. We’ll address the differences listed above and tell you how to handle them. And we’ll tell you where to find the settings that you need to change.

Let's assume that you've already set up the physical network itself. If you haven’t, these two topics will help with that:

What you need to set up a home network

Setting up a home network

Make sure all computers are in the same workgroup
When your network is set up, the next step is to fine-tune it so that all the computers can "see" each other—something you'll need if you want to share files and printers.

It’s important to use the same workgroup name for all of the computers on your network. This makes it possible for computers running different versions of Windows to detect and access each other. Remember that the default workgroup name is not the same in all versions of Windows.

To find or change the workgroup name on a computer running Windows XP:

Click Start, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.

In System Properties, click the Computer Name tab to see the workgroup name. To change the name, click Change, type the new name in Computer name, and then click OK.

To find the workgroup name on a computer running Windows Vista:

Click to open System.

The workgroup name is displayed under Computer name, domain, and workgroup settings.

To change the workgroup name on a computer running Windows Vista:

Click to open System.

Under Computer name, domain, and workgroup settings, click Change settings.

In System Properties, on the Computer Name tab, click Change.

In Computer Name/Domain Changes, in Workgroup, type the name of the workgroup you want to use, and then click OK. You will be prompted to restart your computer.



The workgroup name is displayed in the System window

Set the network location type to Private
Next, check the network location type on all computers running Windows Vista. The network location type is a setting that allows Windows Vista to automatically adjust security and other settings based on the type of network that the computer is connected to. For more information, see Choosing a network location.

There are three network location types:

Public. The computer is connected to a network that is available for public use. Examples of public network types are public Internet access networks such as those found in airports, libraries, and coffee shops. (This location type corresponds to the “Public place” network type.)

Private. The computer is connected to a network that has some level of protection from the Internet (for example, a router and a firewall) and contains known or trusted computers. Most home networks fall into this category. (This location type corresponds to the “Home” or "Work" network type.)

Domain. The computer is connected to a network that contains an Active Directory domain controller. An example of a domain network type is a network at a workplace.

For your home network, make sure that the network location type is set to Private. Here's how to check:

Click to open Network and Sharing Center.

The network location type is displayed in parentheses next to the network name.



The network location type is displayed in Network and Sharing Center

If your network type is Public, here’s how to change it to Private:

To the right of the network name and location type, click Customize.

In Set Network Location, next to Location type, click Private, click Next, and then click Close.

Warning
You should only change a network to Private if it is a known and trusted network such as your home network. Changing a network in a public place to Private can be a security risk.

Open ports in your firewall to allow file and printer sharing
If you're using Windows Firewall, you can skip this section, because Windows Firewall automatically opens the correct ports for file and printer sharing when you turn on network discovery. If you're using another firewall, you must open these ports yourself so that your computer can find other computers and devices that have files or printers that you want to share.

To find other computers running Windows Vista, open these ports:

UDP 3702

TCP 5357

TCP 5358

To find other computers running earlier versions of Windows, and to use file and printer sharing on any version of Windows, open these ports:

UDP 137

UDP 138

TCP 139

To find network devices, open these ports:

UDP 1900

TCP 2869

Turn on additional file and printer sharing options
By changing your network location type to Private, network discovery is automatically turned on in the Sharing and Discovery section of Network and Sharing Center. (For more information about network discovery, see What is network discovery?) You should also turn on these sharing and discovery options:

File sharing

Public folder sharing

Printer sharing

When you turn on these options, your computer can:

Find other computers and devices on your home network and have other computers find your computer.

Share its folders.

Share its Public folder.

Share its printers.

Note
Password protected sharing is a special option that we'll cover below.

To turn on file sharing, public folder sharing, and printer sharing, follow these steps:

Click to open Network and Sharing Center.

Under Sharing and Discovery, click the arrow button next to File sharing to expand the section, click Turn on file sharing, and then click Apply. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

Click the arrow button next to Public folder sharing to expand the section, and then do one of the following:

To share the Public folder so that people on other computers on the network can open files in it but can't create or change files, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can open files, and then click Apply. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation. This is the default setting.

To share the Public folder so that people on other computers on the network can open files in it and also create or change files, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can open, change, and create files, and then click Apply. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

Click the arrow button next to Printer sharing to expand the section, click Turn on printer sharing, and then click Apply. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

Consider using password protected sharing
With password protected sharing enabled, people using other computers on your network can't access your shared folders, including the Public folder, without a user name or password that corresponds to a user account on your computer. (So if you use password protected sharing, you should have matching user accounts on all your computers.)

To turn on password protected sharing, follow these steps:

Click to open Network and Sharing Center.

Under Sharing and Discovery, click the arrow button next to Password protected sharing to expand the section, click Turn on password protected sharing, and then click Apply. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

Having password protected sharing disabled is equivalent to the simple file sharing used in Windows XP.

Using the network map
The network map in Network and Sharing Center is a graphical view of the computers and devices on your network, showing how they are connected and including any problem areas. This can be helpful for troubleshooting. Before a computer running Windows XP can be detected and appear on the network map, you might need to install the Link-Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) protocol on that computer. For more information, go to Network Map Does Not Display Computers Running Windows XP on the Microsoft website.

If the LLTD protocol is installed but computers running Windows XP still do not appear on the network map, firewall settings could be preventing Windows from detecting it. Check the firewall settings and make sure that file and printer sharing are enabled. To learn how to do this, if you are using Windows Firewall, open Help and Support and search for "Enable file and printer sharing." Open the Help topic, and then scroll to the end. If you are using another firewall, check the information that came with your firewall. For more information, see Troubleshoot problems with computers not appearing on the network map.

i copied this straigt out of my visa version windows help and support hope it helps
Joshua Gretzmier

#3 usasma

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 07:49 AM

Just to add a bit here, I think there may be 2 issues present:
1) The workgroup thing, which I fixed at my wife's office with account mirroring. The identical username and password is on each computer that accesses the file server.
2) Vista compatibility - there may be issues with your router's ability to cope with the features of Vista. Check at the D-Link site for compatibility with Vista and any updated firmware that they may have.

Also, try disabling the IPv6 protocol in the network connection, the DHCP broadcast flag ( http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/928233 ), and the IP Helper service on the Vista system. This will increase the chances that the router will act appropriately for your mixed network.
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#4 jjkkclan

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 09:10 PM

I thought that looked familiar. I have read through that and have covered most of it. Some of the firewall port values, I'm not sure of though. Thanks for the suggestions. I will try them and let you know how they worked.

#5 Linkman101

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 01:24 AM

your welcom :trumpet:


your welcome :thumbsup:

your welcome :flowers:
Joshua Gretzmier

#6 jjkkclan

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 08:00 PM

Thank you both for your suggestions. In the end, I had to re-install the original Nvidia Ethernet drivers and that did the trick.

Now a quick-- and I think much simpler question. In the course of trying to figure out the basic network problem, I converted all the computers and the router to use fixed IP addresses. At this point I have not gotten Internet connections sharing to work for any of the machines. Can I get ICS to work and keep the fixed IP addresses or do I have to re-active DHCP for everything?




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