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Another Limited Or No Connectivity Thread


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#1 aznboi986

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 11:19 PM

Hi, first time posting because I've never had a problem with my internet connection. I'm running a Dell laptop which is about a year old. I came home from college and usually the laptop just switches to my home network, but for some reason, when I got home, it couldn't connect. The connection signal is good, but the status says limited or no connectivity. So I tried to do the "repair" function and it resets but nothing changes. I still can't connect to the internet.

So I read through a few threads and I tried to do the run command and ipconfig/release and renew but I get a message that says "No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection while it has its media disconnected."

Also, when I do the ipconfig.exe command, nothing shows up for my Default Gateway Address.

I'm pretty clueless when it comes to these things, but I am fairly sure that there is a problem with the IP Address or something like that. Please help. Thanks.

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#2 Cyb3r_Ninj@

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Posted 26 December 2007 - 07:04 PM

First you want to check to see how your computer is receiving an IP address via the Network Connections applet.

Start >> Control Panel >> Network Connections

Specifically you want to look into the Internet Protocol TCP/IP Properties. So you will need to highlight your wireless network connection and right-click, then choose Properties. This will bring up the Wireless Connection properties applet. In the middle of the applet where it is labelled "This connection uses the following items" scroll down and higlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), then click the Properties radio button. This will bring up the Internet Protocol TCP/IP Properties dialog box.

When you open the Internet Protocol TCP/IP Properties, you want to ensure that your computer is set to Obtain an IP address automatically, the circle should be filled in for this to enable the DHCP protocol on your machine. Once you have confirmed these settings, i'd try connecting to your home network. Once you are connected, i would flush your DNS resolver cache and then refresh your IP address information by issuing these commands individually at the command prompt and pressing [Enter].

First

ipconfig /flushdns

Then

ipconfig /release

Then

ipconfig /renew

That should flush out any resolved internet addresses and should force your computer to release then renew its IP information on your home network.
***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
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:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#3 aznboi986

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 03:30 PM

I did what you suggested, but still nothing.

After I do the ipconfig/renew command, it says "an error occurred whiled renewing interface Wireless Network Connection: unable to contact your DHCP server. Request has timed out."

The signal is good, and even though the signal strength is excellent, there is still limited or no connectivity. It's starting to get quite annoying.

On the wireless network connection status, it says that the problem occurred because the network did not assign a network address to the computer. Any idea on what that means? My brother's laptop works, so why doesn't mine?

Edited by aznboi986, 28 December 2007 - 03:42 PM.


#4 8100 Power

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 08:26 AM

Im having two computers on two diffrent network's with the same problems. I did what suggested above, but still no luck...Anymore ideas?

Edited by 8100 Power, 31 December 2007 - 08:26 AM.


#5 Cyb3r_Ninj@

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 12:53 PM

Sounds like you may need to configure the Router to allow additional network connections if you are having issues with the DHCP server. I believe that the router should be acting as the DHCP server in this case and if it a DHCP lease request is timing out, the router may be dropping these packets being sent from your computer to the router in order to utilize the DHCP service.

Or the DHCP Client service on your machine may not be started or may not be set to automatically start - this may occur because the machine may have been setup at one time to use a static IP address that was manually configured.

First check the DHCP Client service which is under the Services node in Computer Management; you reach the Computer Management console by doing either of the following:

Start >> right-click My Computer >> Manage

OR

Start >> Run >> type compmgmt.msc >> press [Enter]

Once you do either of the above, the Computer Management console will open. You will want to navigate to the Services and Applications node on the tree in the left hand pane. Click the + to expand the node and select Services.

With the Services branch selected, click to activate the right hand pane. Navigate to the DHCP Client service. This service should be set to 'Automatic' under the Startup type column by default. You want to ensure that the service is 'Started' under the Status column.

If the service status is 'Started', you can try restarting the service and then reconnecting to your wireless router. To restart the service, you can click the blue hyperlink which appears underneath the title Services at the border between the left and right hand panes.

If the service is set to 'Manual', you will probably want to switch it to 'Automatic' You can do this by right-clicking the DHCP Client and selecting Properties; this will open the DHCP Client Properties applet. There is a pull-down menu which will allow you change the Startup type, as well as radio buttons for you to Start | Stop | Pause | Resume the service.

Once you have started or restarted the service, then try connecting to your wireless router.

That would be my next item to check in troubleshooting.

Edited by Cyb3r_Ninj@, 31 December 2007 - 12:55 PM.

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:: digital.ronin ::

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#6 aznboi986

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 03:00 PM

I did the suggested actions, but still nothing.

I'm looking at the link status of the WLAN Card Utility and it says the Gateway IP Address is unavailable. Could that be a problem?

#7 8100 Power

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 12:33 AM

Still no go for me either. Both of my computers are still doing this...

I've tried both Wired and Wireless with both, But still not working. Keep in mind I also have other computers connected and their working just fine.

I have run Spy-Bot on both. Could this have removed any windows components i needed? Aznboi, have you recently did a Virius scan and removed so called virius?

#8 8100 Power

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 12:52 AM

Under details it shows My Ip address, Subnet mask, but NOT my: Default gateway, DNS Server, WINS Server...

#9 Cyb3r_Ninj@

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 12:42 PM

To answer the question about Default Gateway, YES, if the Default Gateway IP address is unavailable, that is definitely a HUGE part of the reason why you cannot connect to the Internet, hence Limited or No Connectivity. I will explain a bit more below.

By any chance is your IP address showing up in the range 169.254.0.0 - 169.255.255.255?

That IP address range is reserved for Automatic Private IP Addressing in situations where a DHCP server is unavailable or is not in use at all. Your Router or broadband modem should act as the DHCP server in this case handing out IP addresses for machines that are connected to that particular network. The article at the link below gives more information about this:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/220874

You can try to manually configure the IP address information if you have another computer on your network that is functioning properly and able to get to the Internet. If your machine is set to Obtain an IP address automatically, and receives an IP address in the range above, but does not automatically include a Default Gateway, your machine will NOT be able to communicate with the Internet. The Wireless Router or DSL Modem is your Default Gateway, it is the communication pathway for your machine to send/receive packets to/from the Internet. When you attempt to resolve a web page, most likely you would receive an "HTTP:// 404 Error - This page cannot be displayed" or something to that effect, your machine is attempting to resolve the DNS name of the web page to an IP address, but there is no DNS server or Default Gateway available to send out the information requests and resolve the name to an IP address.

If you are to attempt to manually configure the IP address information, you will want to look into the Network Connection details of an Internet ready machine on your network. On the functional machine you can reach the Network Connection details by opening up the Network Connections applet, locating the active connection and right-clicking it, then choose Status. It will bring up the Wireless Connection Status applet, and you will want to click on the Support tab. On the Support tab, click the Details radio button. The information that you will want to pay attention to is:

-IP Address
-Subnet Mask
-Default Gateway
-DNS Server(s)

Now, on your machine that is NOT Internet ready, you will want to configure the IP address manually by opening up the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties. The Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties can be reached through the Network Connections applet. You will highligh the active connection, right-click it, then choose Properties. It will bring up the Wireless Connection Properties applet, in the scrolling menu underneath "This connection uses the following items", scroll down and highligh Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the Properties radio button. This opens the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties applet.

Click to select Use the following IP address, which will allow you to configure the IP address manually as well as activate the manual DNS server IP address entry box. Use the same Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server addresses as discovered in the functional computer. Select an IP address that increments the right-most octet by one (i.e. if your working IP address is 192.168.1.100, try to use 192.168.1.101). Once you have the manual configuration, try connecting to the Internet.
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Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#10 aznboi986

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 06:14 PM

i did the suggested actions. there is connectivity now, but when i open up internet explorer, i still get the "the page cannot be displayed" message.

and yes, my IP address did fall in that 169 range

#11 8100 Power

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 01:30 AM

I did the suggested action also. I got one computer working doing that. But not the other one...


Is there any kind of driver or anything I can install to make the the default settings go back to orginal..? I just feel like my Spybot erased something that was needed for me to connect. I ran Spybot on both of these computers and then the "No Connectivity" problem occured...

#12 Cyb3r_Ninj@

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 02:27 PM

Sounds like you both are getting closer to a resolution on the issue with Limited or No Connectivity. I've thrown out a lot of advanced information so give yourself a pat on the back for getting this far. I'll address both your posts by heading them with your username so you know what you will want to try. The advice may apply to you both and you may want to try the advice to see if it doesn't resolve your issue for you.

8100 Power:

I can think of two things you might try. To address your question, if you feel that Spybot erased some pertinent files which are affecting your Network Connections, you might try a System Restore. Spybot usually sets a System Restore point prior to making any registry changes in case you need to backtrack. You might check to see if there are any System Restore points which coincide with the timeline when the connectivity problems began. Check your Event Viewer if you are unsure of the exact date when the problems began. You can get there through the Computer Management console. I'd pay attention to the items in the System Log that appear to reference network connections, TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP, or your NIC hardware.

This next advice pertains exactly to your question; this is dependent on you having your Windows XP CD-ROM available. If you don't want to go through the trouble of a System Restore, you can attempt to repair the Windows system files using the System File Checker and Windows File Protection utilities. They run in conjunction and are invoked through the command line. You must first insert your Windows XP CD-ROM into the drive, if it goes into the AutoPlay routine, just cancel out. The System File Checker will need the disc there because it checks for crucial system files and will repair / replace any that have become corrupt, missing, or otherwise altered with clean ones from the /i386 folder of the disc. Invoke the System File Checker as instructed below, the link gives more information from Microsoft's TechNet site regarding use and purpose of the tool - it takes roughly 25-45 minutes to run depending on processor speed, CD-ROM drive RPM, and state of your hard drive.

Start >> Run >> type cmd.exe >> press [Enter] >> type sfc /scannow >> press [Enter]

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library...57126.aspx#ECAA

azboi986:

Now that you've gotten past the Limited or No Connectivity stage, try running the nslookup command from the command line. This will display the current DNS server that is being used to resolve URLs to IP addresses on the Internet. What we want to figure out is if you may have a conflict with your DNS server somewhere along the lines when you attempt to send a request for resolution of an HTTP page. You will need to recall [a] what your manual / static IP address was; and [b] what your manual / static DNS

Do the following:

Start >> Run >> type cmd >> press [Enter] >> type nslookup xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx >> press [Enter]

xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is your static IP address [a].

What you want to compare is the server address that is returned from the command. It should be matching your static DNS server address [b] which you entered into the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties applet when you manually configured your IP address information. If the information matches, i would suggest trying to flush the DNS resolver cache again as posted in previous posts of the this thread.

If it does NOT match, that definitely signifies a problem.

I would try looking into your HOSTS file which is located at C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts. This information is in .txt format and can be opened / edited with Notepad | Wordpad. By default the HOSTS file should only one entry, 127.0.0.1 which points to the localhost - that is the loopback address simply points ping packets to your local machine when you do the ping command. The HOSTS file is loaded into memory at startup to aid in DNS resolution for URL to IP address; you can alter this file yourself with static IP address information for known URLs; your machine will parse this file before contacting a DNS server if the URL you are visiting is listed and can help guarantee that your browser will not be redirected to a spyware infected site.

If you notice that your HOSTS file has a bunch of other entries for other webpages and sites, you may have spyware problems or your browser may have been hijacked which will possibly require a reinstallation or System Restore.

NOTE: by default Spybot S&D will plug in entries for known spyware / malware sites to point back to the local machine. They will be prefixed with a comment indicating that the entries were added as part of Spybot to redirect known spyware / malware sites back to your local machine as a preventative measure to avoid sending your browser to a hijacked webpage. By default, the HOSTS

See what you guys are able to find out and post back.

Edited by Cyb3r_Ninj@, 03 January 2008 - 02:30 PM.

***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#13 aznboi986

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 06:37 PM

I did the nslookup command and it says the DNS request timed out and that it can't find the server name fr the address. It also says "Default Server: Unknown"

But yes, the DNS address matches the one I entered manually.

I flushed the DNS. No problem. Did the ipconfig/release and renew commands but both come up with a message stating "No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection while it has its media disconnected"

So then, I looked up the host file, and there is only one entry with the 127.0.0.1 localhost entry

#14 8100 Power

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:11 AM

Well...

I had tried to do a system restore before posting about my problem. There are no restore points, Not even 4 or 5 months back. Which really suprises me. I'm not sure how it got turned off..

As for the Disk. I hope i can still find that. It should be in my case somewhere. If I can't, Is there any alternative route to restoring those files?

#15 8100 Power

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 08:04 PM

I found my disk. Re-installed my drivers for the LAN and the Wireless. Still no go...

Look at this ipconfig prompt:

Posted Image




Any other ideas. I don't really want to have to recover my computer... :thumbsup:




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