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Create A Secret Folder


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24 replies to this topic

#16 desinet1

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 11:27 PM

I was also able to do that.

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#17 TuF_RyDa

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 04:48 PM

I have my hard drive partitioned and I would like to encrypt one partition with a password. Does anyone know what the best way to do this is?

#18 samuel3

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 03:26 PM

Does this stop Keyloggers from finding these folders if you keep passwords in them?

#19 istbar

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 03:29 PM

to make a secret folder just make a new folder delete its name then hold down alt thn press 0160 on the num pad then change icon to a blank space and its invisible

I don't mean to necropost, but does anyone know a way to force this invisible folder to the end of the list under it's root folder? Right now, it creates a space in the folder structure.
That's a great, simple way of hiding a folder on a system used primarily by 'recreational users'.

istbar
'You tried and you failed. The lesson is never try.'

#20 Lifeblood

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 03:32 PM

Here's another little trick I added for additional security.

You can write a batch file for making the secret folder visible and accesible, and another batch file to make it invisible and unaccessible.

For example, I created my secret folder as described above, but instead of using My Documents as a cover, I am using the Recycle Bin, so I used the CLSID {645FF040-5081-101B-9F08-00AA002F954E} in the desktop.ini file, and a shortcut for the Recycle Bin that I renamed target.

I placed my folder in C:\Documents and Settings\Owner

I then created a new Notepad text file and entered the following text:

@echo off
cd C:\Documents and Settings\Owner
attrib "Recycle Bin" +h +s

renamed it Lock.bat, and saved it.

I then created another new Notepad text file and entered the following text:

@echo off
cd C:\Documents and Settings\Owner
attrib "Recycle Bin" -h -s

renamed it Unlock.bat, and saved it.

If you want to place your folder in another location, make sure you put the correct pathname in your batch files.

I named the batch files Lock.bat and Unlock.bat for the purposes of this explanation, but you can name them anything you want. I would recommend renaming them in order to make their purpose less obvious.

I then created a folder named ntuser because there are some system files located in C:\Documents and Settings\Owner named ntuser.dat, ntuser.dat.log, and ntuser.ini, and it will look like my folder is an important system folder associatated with those system files, and therefore less appealing to mess with by someone snooping around.

Once the ntuser folder is created, place the Lock.bat and Unlock.bat files into the ntuser folder.

Now right-click on the ntuser folder, move down to Send To, and click on Compressed (zipped) Folder. This will zip the files into a compressed folder named ntuser.zip.

Now open the zipped folder, go to the File menu up above, and choose Add a Password. You can then set a password to protect the zip file.

Now throw away the unzipped folder named ntuser, NOT the zipped folder named ntuser.zip. Be careful NOT TO throw away ntuser.dat, ntuser.dat.log, or ntuser.ini.

Now when you want to view your files just click on the zipped folder named ntuser.zip, choose Lock.bat, click Run, and enter the password. The folder named Recycle Bin will become visible and accessible.

When you want to hide your files just click on the zipped folder named ntuser.zip, choose Unlock.bat, click Run, and enter the password. The folder named Recycle Bin will become invisible and unaccessible.

If you want to be super secure you can create another folder named ntuser2, for example, place ntuser.zip into it, then zip and password protect the ntuser2 folder. This will give you two levels of security, and it also has the added benefit of making only the folder names ntuser and ntuser2 visible when a snooper opens the ntuser2.zip folder, snoopers won't be able to see the names of the files Lock.bat and Unlock.bat.

You can hide the zipped folder further by right-clicking on it, choosing Properties, selecting hidden, and then renaming the folder to ntuser.sys. You'll have to rename it back ntuser.zip when you want to use it though.

So, for somebody to get to my files they would have find the file named ntuser.sys and identify it as my secret folder, which would be virtually impossible, rename it to ntuser.zip, enter the passwords for however many levels of zip folders I created, and then enter the password to run the file for Unlock.bat.

Hope this helps.

#21 Carpetsmoker

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 06:40 PM

This might stop your kid system from accessing your files (If she doesn't look to hard), but not anyone else.
Also, `security through obscurity' is almost always a bad idea.

If you want to protect a few files, encrypt them, you can easily do this by creating a 7-zip archive for example (Which uses AES-256 IIRC), which is just as easy as the above method.
There are many, many, specialized tools out there, including free ones.
UNIX was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things.

#22 Andrew

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 11:13 AM

This might stop your kid system from accessing your files (If she doesn't look to hard), but not anyone else.
Also, `security through obscurity' is almost always a bad idea.

If you want to protect a few files, encrypt them, you can easily do this by creating a 7-zip archive for example (Which uses AES-256 IIRC), which is just as easy as the above method.
There are many, many, specialized tools out there, including free ones.


Very good points! I use Truecrypt encrypted virtual volumes (not as complicated as the name implies.)

#23 Synetech

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 09:14 PM

The reason that it does not work for some people is because the are putting a file called target in the folder instead of target.lnk. This isnít a problem for most people since shortcut files usually hide their LNK extension even if you have donít-hide-extensions checked (it takes an extra step to reveal a few specialextensions). This means that most people will just be changing the filename and the extension remains LNK, but if you rename at the command prompt, then you can drop the extension. This is why it didnít work for me the first time; hence the computer-does-not-recognize-it icon as mentioned above.

Sure it may not be a replacement for true encryption, but itís a cute use of desktop.inióthere are so many fun tricks in that file arenít there? :thumbsup:óso use it for what itís suited for, not for protecting private data (and certainly not for enterprise systems).
****** *** ****** * ****; * ***** **** ** *** **** ******* *** ****** ************ ****.

-- Synetech

#24 Andrew

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 12:27 PM

The reason that it does not work for some people is because the are putting a file called target in the folder instead of target.lnk. This isnít a problem for most people since shortcut files usually hide their LNK extension even if you have donít-hide-extensions checked (it takes an extra step to reveal a few specialextensions). This means that most people will just be changing the filename and the extension remains LNK, but if you rename at the command prompt, then you can drop the extension. This is why it didnít work for me the first time; hence the computer-does-not-recognize-it icon as mentioned above.

Very good point.
*Amazing Andrew sometimes forgets all the little tweaks he's done to his poor, abused machine.

#25 Machinery

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 05:28 AM

Try this:
Right Click -> New Folder -> Press Alt 255 -> Right Click Folder -> Change Icon -> No Icon
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