Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Wireless Network Problems.


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 raidencmc

raidencmc

  • Members
  • 170 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:39 AM

Posted 16 December 2007 - 08:21 PM

I have a laptop that has a wireless connection to my router which is connected to my modem. Half of the time it is great and then other times it is very slow. I am using Zone alarm as my firewall. If I am browsing and I watch the icon in the system tray when it is slow in and out (green and red bars) are doing nothing. Then the green will fill up and the page I am requesting will open very fast. I did some research and believe that my problem is my signal to noise ratio. At any given time I get a reading of 30 to 100. I think that is bad but I might be interpreting that wrong. Please tell me any more info you need.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Crizz44

Crizz44

  • Members
  • 496 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Virginia
  • Local time:08:39 AM

Posted 16 December 2007 - 09:37 PM

I am not sure if this is your problem, but I know of several people that have started having problems with their wireless connections and have ZoneAlarm. They had ZA for a long time and never had any problems, they just started in the last few months. A few uninstalled and reinstalled ZA and say it works fine now. Some switched to Comodo and do not have problems anymore, but liked ZA better.
It wouldn't hurt to try uninstalling and reinstalling to see if there is a difference.

Another thing that can slow down your connection is the Phishing filter setting on your IE. You may want to try turning it off and see if there is a difference.

#3 Cyb3r_Ninj@

Cyb3r_Ninj@

  • Members
  • 169 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silicon Valley
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 17 December 2007 - 05:33 PM

You will incur signal attenuation due to multiple factors depending on where your wireless AP is set up, but some examples include (NOTE: signal attenutation is just a fancy term for describing signal loss and / or interference):

-Close proximity to radio stations or signal repeaters - (EMI)
-Close proximity to power lines - electromagnetic interference (EMI)
-Close proximity to transformers / generators - electromagnetic interference (EMI)
-Density / proximity wireless AP signals - if you live in an apartment complex where multiple wireless APs are in close proximity, they all use the same radio waves, collisions are inevitable

Some of the factors you will have no control over, but one aspect you do have control over is the transmission / reception channel your wireless AP will operate on.

If you are in a location with a high density of wireless APs from other residences or buildings, there is a method to change the transmit and receiving channels* for your wireless AP and NIC. Consult the administrative or owner's manuals for the exact method by which you can do so through the software interface. If too many wireless APs are transmitting and receiving on the same channel at the same time, the result is going to be mid-air collisions of packets over the radio waves. By switching to a channel that has less traffic on it, you can reduce the number of packet collisions and that would help boost performance.

A good tool to scan for wireless APs close by and determine what channel they are operating on is Netstumbler, which you can download at the link below:
http://www.netstumbler.com/downloads/

Netstumbler is a great wireless AP discover utility that can operate through your wireless NIC in order to discover wireless APs in close proximity to your location. It will give you more information than just the SSID or router's name such as: MAC addresses, SSIDs, encryption detection, *operating channel, etc. Its a great tool to give you an idea of how many other wireless APs are competing for the radio waves that your wireless router needs to transmit and receive information across.

You might also want to read through this post for information about boosting transmission and receiving signal strengths:
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/120842/using-an-access-point/

Edited by Cyb3r_Ninj@, 17 December 2007 - 05:34 PM.

***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#4 raidencmc

raidencmc
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 170 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:39 AM

Posted 17 December 2007 - 06:44 PM

I used Netstummbler to come up with the figures. The reason I figured the problem was the SNR was because my signal strength is always Excellent or Very Good. Although that is when I am viewing "Wireless Network Connection Status" and I am not sure how often that refreshes or if it is in real time. I did change my wireless channel because the channel I was using overlapped one that was being used near by.

#5 Cyb3r_Ninj@

Cyb3r_Ninj@

  • Members
  • 169 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silicon Valley
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 18 December 2007 - 05:21 PM

Without knowing your home network topology and surrounding environment, its tough to pinpoint the source of signal attenuation which is most likely the cause of the fluctuations in the SNR metric.

The signal attenuation could be due to the overlapping wireless AP signals that are competing for the radio waves at peak times.
It could be due to EMI that is affecting the twisted pair during transmission to / from the modem when the signal is going into and out of the building.
It could be due to EMI from radio waves if someone in the apartment up/downstairs turns on a high-power microwave to cook some popcorn.

Might not be a bad idea to try removing or disabling Zone alarm and just letting your connection sit for a bit while monitoring in Netstumbler to see if that doesn't have any affect on the attenuation / SNR.

I've never used Zone Alarm myself, but have seen posts indicating this as a breaking point in wireless communication.
***********************************************************************
Bill Gates recognizes the skills... so i suggest you start there and recognize them too...
***********************************************************************
:: digital.ronin ::

| MCP - ID 5646435, other certifications pending... |

#6 raidencmc

raidencmc
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 170 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:39 AM

Posted 18 December 2007 - 05:56 PM

Thanks I will see what I can find




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users