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Computer Freezing Up When I Try To Install Ubuntu 7.10


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9 replies to this topic

#1 JacksonT

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 06:56 PM

Recently I tried to install Ubuntu 7.10 on my computer but it would freeze up during the install at timezone selection so I tried it in safe graphics mode which worked until it got to actually installing the system and it would freeze up at 15% so I shutdown the computer removed the CD and tried to start up windows XP but no matter how I try to start windows I get an error mesage saying that windows could not start properly. So now im without any Os I have the windows restore disks but would rater not have to use them.

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#2 nightspydk

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 07:23 PM

Is there any chance with those recovery disks, that you can access this?
http://support.microsoft.com/?scid=kb%3Ben...p;x=12&y=14
I'm not to familiar with it myself, but maybe have a look. :thumbsup:
Sounds like it's complicated, but it's not. I just never use it.

*run a chkdsk from there.

Edited by nightspydk, 25 November 2007 - 07:26 PM.


#3 groovicus

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:54 PM

What sort of system are you running? You should be able to repair the master boot record (which is what is broken), but I am guessing that the procedure may depend on how the manufacturer has set up their restore process.

#4 JacksonT

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 01:54 PM

I'm using a E-machines C2280

256mb ram
80gb HDD
AMD Athlon xp 2200+ CPU

#5 nightspydk

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 05:55 PM

Linux/windows.
groovicus is right. This a matter of getting the mbr fixed. See if that sorts it out.
From the console -
fixmbr

#6 JacksonT

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:16 PM

I attempted to use recovery console but the restore disks I am using only give me the option to install XP or boot to command prompt via the disks.

note: I also read some wear that you need at least 320mb of ram to install Ubuntu from a live CD made from burning the ISO's I doubt it but does any one know for sure ?

#7 nightspydk

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:49 PM

That's it.
Boot to command prompt and type
fixmbr
press return

#8 Joedude

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 07:04 AM

All live cd's are a bit greedy for ram, as a result, live cd installs will require higher ram. The options are there, distros like debian integrate the text base install as a part of the distro cd, Ubuntu has an alternate install cd, as well as gentoo (be ready to be perplexed if you go this route)...I could go on this forever. Anywho...if you have a low specs machine (as one of my boxes is) just grab the alternate install, or the text based installs straight away. This will save you from making cd's into coasters, time and a bity of frustration. The text base is as easy, and easy to install as the gui versions.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#9 JacksonT

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 04:50 PM

That's it.
Boot to command prompt and type
fixmbr
press return


Tried that but the drive it gives me to prompt from is my floppy drive and I cant get it to change to my hard drive or disk drive and when I enter the command it tells me its invalid

Edited by JacksonT, 27 November 2007 - 04:52 PM.


#10 nightspydk

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 06:18 PM

That's a pain. :thumbsup:

Here's something that might be worth a try. Might have uses also in the future for you.

Read here, Accessing the Recovery Console Without a Windows CD -
http://commandwindows.com/recovery.htm

..and get the setup disks here -
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?...b;en-us;Q310994

edit
More on the recovery console/how to use -
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/how-to-install-the-windows-xp-recovery-console/

Edited by nightspydk, 28 November 2007 - 12:22 AM.





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