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Building/buying A New Computer?


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#1 Luke Tennison

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 11:01 PM

Hi, my name is Luke and I'm a newbie here at bleepingcomputer. I'm getting a new desktop weather I have to buy it or build it. I've heard from various places for building I should look to newegg, and tigerdirect. And for buying, dell, HP, and cyberpower. I have never built a comp and only bought one once so all help would be appreciated. :thumbsup:

I know to fully help me you will need some info so here it is:

$3000-$4000 budget (less is better)
Uses include-animating-extreme gaming-video editing-internet surfing+e-mail
Want it to be as fast as I can afford, no waiting + with the best graphics
DVD burner, lightscribe, blu ray is not needed but would be nice if affordable
Surround sound
Wireless mouse and keyboard
No printer or joystick (already got 'em) But I need a good webcam with high compatiblities (I do alot of stop-motion animation)
Current enough tech to not be outdated anytime soon

If anymore info needed please just say so.
Thanks

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#2 Sterling14

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 05:39 AM

hi, and welcome to bleepingcomputer! You should build your own computer because its actually easier then it seems!

For graphics, I've heard good things about these new ATI cards. ATI 3870 You could get two of them and get very good performance for a good price.

Asus X38 motherboard That motherboard uses the new Intel X38 chipset which is very good, and works very well with Crossfire (two or more ATI graphics cards being used together at the same time).

Q6600 . That is a very good processor (it's quad core) so you will be able to multitask and have good speed at the same time.

I'd suggest (especially if your getting windows vista) to get 4gb of ram and 64-bit version of windows. G.skill 4gb (2x2gb) DDR2 ram

Thermaltake 700Watt PSU, four 12v rails . If you get two or more graphics cards, you need a good power supply. Yiou don't want to go cheap on one, because if it fries it can take other parts with it!

How much space will you need for your hard drive?

Hopefully someone else can come around and help you out more! These are good parts, and I don't think Dell or any of those other companies could offer a computer like this, at least not at this price.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#3 Luke Tennison

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 10:46 AM

Thanks! That really helped. I see building can be alot easier and I'll probably do that.
And I need about 250-300GB hard drive.

*Hopefully someone could help here, as since this is my first time addtional to the parts you mentioned I need to know what case and hard drve and dvd drive and stuff like that are all going to be compatible. I don't want to buy all the parts and figure out they don't work. Thanks for all future help!

#4 Grinler

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 12:17 PM

I agree with Sterling14 on everything but the mobo and graphic cards. I would instead go with a nvidia 680i based board so you can SLI two 8800GTs together. 8800GTs are the cards to get with their price point (279-300) and kick major touchas. Waiting for them to get back in stock and buying one for myself.

#5 Sneakycyber

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 04:44 PM

When choosing a case its pretty much whatever looks good to you and is in your budget. Coolermaster, and Rosewill cases are popular among forum Members ( I have a Rosewill case, and many have the centurion 5 case from Coolermaster). You should look for a case that has at least 2 x 120mm fans since you will be building a pretty fast system with possibly 2 video cards which generate allot of heat. Ideally you want 1 intake fan in the front and an exhaust fan in the back, some cases will also have a mounting position on the side for an additional fan. Tooless or Tool-free designs are self explanatory you won't need a screwdriver for changing add on cards or for installing drives.
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#6 Sterling14

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 06:33 PM

Well if he wants to spend a bit more and go SLI, he should get two 8800GT's (not GTS by the way). They perform better then either version of the 8800GTS, and are about the same price as a 320mb version.

You can get any hard drive, as long as its Sata (preferably Sata 3.0gb/s). Some good brands are Western Digital, Seagate, Maxtor, and I think Hitachi is pretty good. I wouldn't go with any other brands.

I don't know much about Blue Ray, but I could find you a good regular DVD drive with all the works and lightscribe. They usually only cost around 35$, but when you throw in Blue Ray of course it goes way up.

For a case, just look through any that say ATX form factor. The motherboard (which most current ones are either Micro ATX or just ATX) should be ATX or Micro ATX. You can pick out cases by looks, but its also important to look beyond that to see what features it has, how good the air flow is, etc.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#7 Luke Tennison

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 10:57 PM

I found this case, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811133021 and I was wondering if would be good for compatibility. Its got lots of fans and vents, cool looking, and its ATX compatible. And in the first post there was a fair bit of components that would work, but I would apreciate it if the rest were filled in because my only concern about building a computer is that I'll build it and it wont work.
Thanks again for future help

Edited by Luke Tennison, 20 November 2007 - 10:59 PM.


#8 4ward_tristan

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 11:02 PM

u could build the system you are after for 2500 (aud)

pretty much all the specs im thinking of have already been listed previously.

in re. to OS, mainly 64bit, make sure that the animation programs and stuff that u r going to be using are compatible!!

it is intimidating building a system for your first time, but it is extremely do-able, you learn a heap in the process, and is very fun! so dont be scared, get stuck into it!

a plus side is that when u build a system, it doesnt come pre-installed with 25gb of crap programs that the manufactures love to stick on there for you.

i have a antec 900 "gaming" case, and i am stoked with it. my q6600 runs extremely cool, even my 2900xt runs quite cool albeit extremely loud under load :thumbsup:.

i would buy a p35 based motherboard oppose to x38, i have just read some sketchy stuff on those so far (are you comfortable flashing the bios?)

anyways, goodluck with it all and im sure people would be more then happy to help you in re. to builind it yourself(myself included! =D )

goodluck and have fun =)
=)

#9 4ward_tristan

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 11:25 PM

generally, you will be buying these componenets

IF INTEL:

a socket 775 (most likely core 2 duo/quad cpu)

a socket 775 motherboard

IF AMD:

a socket am2(940 pin) cpu

a socket am2 motherboard

THE REST:

the rest will all fit, ddr2 ram, a pci-e video card, preferably sata hdd, even a sata dvd bunrer(makes cable management a breeze!)

EDIT: remember, componenets can usually only go in one way, into one socket(unless extreme force is used, ddrII into ddr slots, anyone?)

Edited by 4ward_tristan, 20 November 2007 - 11:26 PM.

=)

#10 Luke Tennison

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:35 AM

Thanks! :thumbsup: I'm almost ready to order the parts, i just need a checklist, or somthing that tells me every component that is required for the comp to run. I have most of the key components, like the hard drive and case and ram, but I just need to know if their are any smaller things like special cords or chips?
Thanks

#11 Sterling14

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 05:40 AM

Make sure you have:
1. Motherboard
2. Processor
3. Case
4. Ram
5. Graphics card(s)
6. Hard Drive
7. Operating System
8. DVD drive
The motherboard should come with all the cords you need, the case should come with the screws. If you buy a retail processor the heatsink and fan should come with it, or you could buy a better separate one if your worried about heat.

Also, you might want to buy a small tube of arctic silver 5 thermal compound. It's the paste you put in between the processor and heatsink to keep the processor cool. Arctic Silver 5

When you apply it on the processor, less is better. Put an amount the size of a small grain of rice. Smooth it over the area of the processor that will be touching the heatsink. It should be a very thin layer.

Also, the mistake I made on my first computer build, was I didn't put the copper stand offs in. The copper stand offs are these copper things that screw into the board, and then have threading on the top part, so another screw can screw into it ( probably a bad explanation). Anyways before you put the motherboard in, you should put these in the screw holes on the case, and secure them a little bit with a wrench. Then you can put the motherboard on these and screw the motherboard into them. This keeps the metal on the case from shorting out the motherboard.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#12 Sneakycyber

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 06:16 AM

9. Power supply

Edit: If your not using one thats included with the case.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 21 November 2007 - 06:17 AM.

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#13 Grinler

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 10:57 AM

Yup, I meant 8800GT, not 8800GTS.

I just bought an awesome power supply. Expensive, but i love the modular cables.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817139002

#14 Sneakycyber

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 05:25 PM

Thats a whole lot of case there. It would definatly work for your computer. IMO its a little expensive but it is a full tower case. It should work perfectly for your high end rig.
Chad Mockensturm 
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#15 Luke Tennison

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 07:56 PM

I have all the items here: Thermaltake Armor Series VA8003BWS Black Full Tower Case w/ 25CM Fan - Retail - Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3250410AS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM - Hanns·G HG-281DPB Black 28" 3ms Widescreen HDMI LCD Monitor - Retail - XFX PVT88PYDD4 GeForce 8800GT 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card - Retail (x2) - ASUS Black SATA DVD-ROM Drive Model DVD-E616A3T OEM - OEM - Thermaltake W0106RU Complies with ATX 12V 2.2 & EPS 12V version 700W Power Supply - Retail - Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM - G.SKILL 4GB(2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F2-6400CL4D-4GBPK - Retail - ASUS P5E LGA 775 Intel X38 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail - Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 Kentsfield 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80562Q6600 - Retail - Microsoft Windows Vista 64-Bit Home Premium for System Builders Single Pack DVD - OEM
if there are any missing items or incompatible parts please let me know.

Edited by Luke Tennison, 21 November 2007 - 08:01 PM.





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