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Computer Slows After Installation Of Norton Internet Security 2007


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#1 Ras_Al_Ghul

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 11:23 AM

Hi, Folks.

I recently downloaded Norton Internet Security and immediately began to see performance issues almost immediately, such as:

Extreme slowness
100 CPU usage keeps popping up

Symantec's advice is not very helpful (as usual). I tried clearing the temp Windows files using their tool and attempted to remove items from my startup as they recommended, but when logging back in was instructed by the PC software to return to the original settings.

The slowness seems sporadic.

This anti-virus software seems worse than a low level virus.

Any help / advice is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
The most likely way for the world to be destroyed, most experts agree, is by accident. That's where we come in; we're computer professionals. We cause accidents. - Nathaniel Borenstein (1957 - )

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#2 frankp316

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 11:44 AM

Since it's a paid program, the obvious answer is to ditch it and use freeware. Are you willing to do that?

#3 Ras_Al_Ghul

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 11:50 AM

I was thinking of doing just that. Any recommendations for the freeware?

Just a note - I also have Kerio Firewall, which seems fine.

And thanks for your help!
The most likely way for the world to be destroyed, most experts agree, is by accident. That's where we come in; we're computer professionals. We cause accidents. - Nathaniel Borenstein (1957 - )

#4 tg1911

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 12:49 PM

If your using Norton Internet Security, which I believe has a firewall, and Kerio, that could be part of your problem.
Running 2 firewalls is a no-no, as they will conflict with each other.

Diasble the Kerio firewall, and see if that reduces your slow down, to an acceptable level.
Norton Internet Security will slow your system down also, as it's a major resource hog.
The 2 freeware antivirus that I see being mentioned most, by our members are Avast, and AVG.
I use AVG, and have been happy with it, for several years.

You can find other options in our Freeware Replacements For Common Commercial Apps topic, under the Antivirus Applications heading, in Post #1.

.
.

Edited by tg1911, 13 November 2007 - 12:50 PM.

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#5 Papakid

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 12:47 PM

Since it's a paid program, the obvious answer is to ditch it and use freeware. Are you willing to do that?

I don't see how this is an "obvious answer". I am no fan of Norton and love that there are freeware alternatives available, but if I pay for something I would rather get my money's worth from it. If it could be configured to run in a way that I could live with, which is what I think tg1911 is getting at.

IOW, if you installed the firewall part of Norton Internet Security (NIS), while Kerio is still installed, I would try uninstalling Kerio or the Norton firewall and make sure you have nothing else running that would conflict. According to PCMag, the 2007 version of NIS reduced the amount of resources required. If you can get it to run this way I would keep it at least til the subscription expires, then maybe try something else.

If you go with uninstalling the Norton firewall and keep Kerio, you should also look into whether Norton AV's Internet Worm Protection is enabled. I think it is supposed to be a HIPS feature, but it behaves like a firewall and some people I've dealt with have solved some problems with internet access by disabling it.

There are certain advantages to having a commercial AV installed. Scheduling of updates and full system scans along with Norton's generally good detection rate would be the most important. Also better product support, but with Norton as an exception there as you've pointed out. Used to be their email support was pretty good but they charge for phone support. There are other AV's better at this.

If you are pretty experienced in security matters, then personal support is not that big of a factor. You won't get any one on one personal support from the free AV's, altho most now have forums where you can get help from your peers and of course, this forum.

As I said, I'm all for freeware alternatives. I recommend them to people all the time especially when I see they have an older verison of Norton that's dragging down their system. McAfee and Trend Micro as well lately. But the two mentioned here do not have a great detection rate. People who use them and recommend them usually have enough knowledge to protect themselves and prevent getting infected in the first place. But if you do any high risk surfing and tend toward unsafe practices such as opening email attachments and instant messaging links without checking them out first, then I would stick with a commercial AV--especially if I had already paid for it.

If you do go for a switch to freeware, however, I've been hearing a lot of good reports about Avira's Antivir freeware AV. It's been known to detect some of the newer malware even before some of the commercial ones. I'm not sure if it's user interface is very user friendly tho--been meaning to give it a try but haven't had much time lately.

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is they change

when they walk away.--Mipso


#6 frankp316

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 05:15 PM

In his original post, he didn't say he had Kerio.

#7 Ras_Al_Ghul

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:18 PM

Thank you, Folks.

I am going to try uninstalling Kerio and see what happens. I also used Spybot to remove some of the programs from my startup routine, and that seems to have improved performance a bit.
The most likely way for the world to be destroyed, most experts agree, is by accident. That's where we come in; we're computer professionals. We cause accidents. - Nathaniel Borenstein (1957 - )

#8 Ras_Al_Ghul

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 09:42 PM

Thank you guys!

Performance is much improved leaving Norton intact and uninstalling Kerio and removing some items from startup.

Thanks again!
The most likely way for the world to be destroyed, most experts agree, is by accident. That's where we come in; we're computer professionals. We cause accidents. - Nathaniel Borenstein (1957 - )




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