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#1 raevyn

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 11:44 AM

I am new to computers i have used them before but never owned one until recently. a couple of things keep popping up one being this:
cookies:beth@ad.yieldmanager.com/
This has appeared twice now on my system scans, I got rid of it once with help from a friend but its back. what can i do to prevent and or get rid of this thing.
Two: is this comes up right after i log on to the computer
Error loading C:\Windows\system32\gzmrotate.dll
The specified module could not be found.
What is this and can i fix it..i don't know what it could be harming and or causing problems with but all i know i that it wasn't there one day and its there now. Any help would be wonderful.

Thanks,
Raevyn

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#2 boopme

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 02:54 PM

Hello raevyn,Welcome to Bleeping Computer
what anti virus and Spyware applications are you running?

Description: gzmrotate.dll is located in the folder C:\Windows\System32. The file size on Windows XP is 61440 bytes.
This .dll file is a Browser Helper Object (BHO) that runs automatically every time you start your Internet browser. BHOs are not stopped by personal firewalls, because they are identified by the firewall as your browser itself. BHOs are often used by adware and spyware. The unique ID of this BHO is 6FA3DF44-D34D-4538-9B82-136D43126F30. There is no description of the program. The program has no visible window. The file is an unknown file in the Windows folder. It is able to monitor Internet browser. The service has no detailed description. Program starts when Windows starts (see Registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run). It is not a Windows core file. gzmrotate.dll seems to be a compressed file. Therefore the technical security rating is 99% dangerous.

file.net

I would suggest you Run your malware tools. Scan from Safe Mode.
You should definately run SUPERAntiSpyware.( Free Home Version) Download, install and update it.Then reboot into Safe mode and scan. Run full scan on your C or root drive.
Delete /quaratine everything it finds. Should find both items. If you cannot enter safe mode then run it from normal mode.
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#3 raevyn

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:38 PM

I am running Norton Security scan and the att and t online security protection. thanks for the link i will try my best to figure it all out

Raevyn

#4 buddy215

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 06:24 PM

Change your settings in Internet options to block the advertising cookies known as "Third Party Cookies". If you do that before running the Super Antispyware scan, you should never have the cookies installed by adverisers again. Simple directions for how to do that is in the link below. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vis...cookies-in-ie7/

I also thought you might want the instructions for setting up and running SAS in safe mode.
After downloading SAS:
Double-click SUPERAntiSypware.exe and use the default settings for installation.
An icon will be created on your desktop. Double-click that icon to launch the program.
If asked to update the program definitions, click "Yes". If not, update the definitions before scanning by selecting "Check for Updates". (If you encounter any problems while downloading the updates, manually download and unzip them from here.)
Under "General and Startup", make sure "Start SUPERAntiSpyware when Windows starts" box is unchecked.
Under "Configuration and Preferences", click the Preferences button.
Click the Scanning Control tab.
Under Scanner Options make sure the following are checked (leave all others unchecked):
Close browsers before scanning.
Scan for tracking cookies.
Terminate memory threats before quarantining.
Click the "Close" button to leave the control center screen and exit the program.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reboot your computer in "SAFE MODE" using the F8 method. To do this, restart your computer and after hearing your computer beep once during startup (but before the Windows icon appears) press the F8 key repeatedly. A menu will appear with several options. Use the arrow keys to navigate and select the option to run Windows in "Safe Mode".

Scan with SUPERAntiSpyware as follows:
Launch the program and back on the main screen, under "Scan for Harmful Software" click Scan your computer.
On the left, make sure you check C:\Fixed Drive.
On the right, under "Complete Scan", choose Perform Complete Scan.
Click "Next" to start the scan. Please be patient while it scans your computer.
After the scan is complete, a Scan Summary box will appear with potentially harmful items that were detected. Click "OK".
Make sure everything has a checkmark next to it and click "Next".
A notification will appear that "Quarantine and Removal is Complete". Click "OK" and then click the "Finish" button to return to the main menu.
If asked if you want to reboot, click "Yes".
To retrieve the removal information after reboot, launch SUPERAntispyware again.
Click Preferences, then click the Statistics/Logs tab.
Under Scanner Logs, double-click SUPERAntiSpyware Scan Log.
If there are several logs, click the current dated log and press View log. A text file will open in your default text editor.
Click Close to exit the program and reboot normally.
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#5 raevyn

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 08:57 PM

Omg you wouldn't believe all the crap that was on my computer. Thanks you guys for everything, however the error thing still pops up upon loading of any profile on the computer:
Error loading C:\Windows\system32\gzmrotate.dll
The specified module could not be found.

I don't know what that is and/or if its harmful or if it can even be fixed but you guys rock and i had like 2300 bad things on my computer and 6 trojans?? what the heck is a trojan.
thanks again

Raevyn :thumbsup:

#6 boopme

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 10:14 PM

You're welcome.
This is probably the broken .dll of the BHO (Browser Helper Object) that installed it. But it can also be part of a Vundo infection. So now run this VundoFix BC tutorial

Let us know
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#7 quietman7

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 12:10 PM

Cookies are text string messages given to a Web browser by a Web server. Whenever you visit a web page or navigate different pages with your browser, the web site generates a unique ID number which your browser stores in a text (cookie) file that is sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from that server. Cookies allow third-party providers such as ad serving networks, spyware or adware providers to track personal information. The main purpose of cookies is to identify users and prepare customized Web pages for them.

Types of Cookies:
1st-Party cookies are from the web site (URL) you are visiting.
3rd-Party cookies are from another web site that places content on that 1st-party site.
Legacy Cookies are cookies that were present before IE 6.0 was installed or imported from another browser.

Cookies can be categorized as:
Trusted cookies are from sites you trust, use often, and want to be able to identify and personalize content for you.
Nuisance cookies are from those sites you do not recognize or often use but somehow it's put a cookie on your machine.
Bad cookies are those that can be linked to an ad company or something that tracks your movements across the web. They are called "profiling cookies," "persistent cookies," "long term tracking cookies," "third party tracking cookies" or "tracking cookies”.

The type of cookie that is a cause for concern is the last category because they can be considered a privacy risk. These types of cookies are used to track your Web browsing habits (your movement from site to site). Ad companies use them to record your activity on all sites where they have placed ads. They can keep count of how many times you visited a web page, store your username and password so you don't have to log in and retain your custom settings. When you visit one of these sites, a cookie is placed on your computer. Each time you visit another site that hosts one of their ads, that same cookie is read, and soon they have assembled a list of which of their sites you have visited and which of their ads that you have clicked on. They are used all over the Internet and advertisement companies often plant them whenever your browser loads one of their banners. Cookies are NOT a "threat". As text files they cannot be executed to cause any damage. Cookies do not cause any pop ups nor do they install malware.

As long as you surf the Internet, you are going to get cookies and some of your security programs will flag them for removal. However, you can minimize this by reading "Blocking & Managing Unwanted Cookies"
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