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How Difficult Is It To Build A Computer?


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#1 Lucky23

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:47 PM

Question 1

Hi, im new here and im just wondering how hard it is to build a computer. I dont mean putting it together cuz i think i can handle that but mainly getting it all to work correctly. Things like BIOS (which i dont fully understand how to set up) and other things to make sure all the components will be recognized and opperate correctly.

Im currently have a Compaq presario SR1503WM with a 2.93Ghz Celeron D, 533 bus, and 256kb cashe, 80GB hdd.

Ive done almost all the basics to this computer and others that i have had.

On this comp ive installed 2GB Kingston PC2700, A BFG FX5500 OC 256MB PCI (my comp unfortunitly didnt come with PCIe), Antec Case fan, Spire SP495S11-U Heatsink w/ fan attached.

On other computers ive installed blank hard drives, cd drives/ burners, and windows.

What im asking is overall how difficult it is when you get to the software point? Is it mainly plug and play install drivers and windows Xp and everything works or is it more involved then that?

I understand im typing alot but im trying to grasp this and just need some help.

Question 2

Or what if i just wanted to install a motherboard that is just a little bit more up to date then mine and that has PCIe

Maybe some thing like the one below?

ASUS P5GPL-X SE LGA 775 Intel 915PL ATX Intel Motherboard

And my processor to this

Intel Celeron D 360 Cedar Mill 3.46GHz 512KB L2 Cache LGA 775 Processor

This way my Processor speed would be faster, My processor Cashe would double to 512kb instead of 256kb, and i would have a PCIe slot.

How difficult would this Be?
What motherboard do you recommend?
What intel processor do you recommend thats faster then a Celeron D but not really really expensive?

Thanks for all the help And Sorry for the long question.
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#2 Sterling14

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 08:09 PM

Welcome to Bleepingcomputer!

I've built a couple of computer's and its fairly easy. There's always one little thing though that always gets you frustrated, but you can usually figure it out easily. Anyways, really don't get a celeron processor. They are really Junky. If your really on a budget, and want Intel one of the low end dual core's would be good. Dual core's .

I didn't look up your motherboard, so I don't know if one of those would work. Really, it would be best to get a core 2 duo, but I know what its like to be on a budget :thumbsup:
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#3 Lucky23

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 08:17 PM

What about the software? Like say i got it all put together with a blank hdd. I know when ive installed hdd ive had to install the hdd software first so the computer will recognize theres a hdd but then after that do you just install windows?

Then after windows is fully installed will you install the motherboard software or do you not need software for the motherboard?

Will windows automatically recognize the motherboard?
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#4 markusos

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 09:19 PM

Lucky 23

i too am not very computer savvy, yet, i managed to put all of the pieces into a computer box and get things running

i've done it a couple of times, without huge holes in my knowledge of software - and hardware for that matter

i've always loaded windows from floppy disk startup disks, but, i think there are other ways

your question, to me at least, suggests your not understanding a couple of things, sorry for being straight

if your windows boots up, your system and your motherboard HAS recognized everything it has to recognize

if you can get windows to boot up and run, you've pretty much completed EVERYTHING

there's really ALMOST no need to get anything to recognize your motherboard, bios or cmos, i think, kind of does that automatically

the only thing i remember (its been a couple of years since i built a couple computers) is in the bios files setting some of the parameters, for example, what kind of hard drive you have, what kind of disk drives you have etcc

good luck

markusos

#5 markusos

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 09:26 PM

I meant to say WITH huge gaps in software knowledge

again, Lucky 23, the cmos/bios, the purpose, i think, or one of the funtions at least, of that tiny little bios chip is to recognize
what is connected inside the box, so, there isn't any software, excuse me if i'm wrong here, but, i don't remember software for a harddrive or software for the motherboard

just plug everything in, put it all together and try booting, and go from there

again, i load windows from 4 floppy diskettes, and then a cd with windows xp on it, but, maybe there are other ways

do you know how to get into the bios files?

markusos

#6 4ward_tristan

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 10:28 PM

putting together a pc is extremely easy.

in 1.5 hours(depending on net connection) you can go from, nothing, to a fully update complete system

these days all you have to do is screw the mobo in, plug some components in and thats it.

leave the bios at default - the hdds and all that shiz will auto detect by itself.

some tips: plug your front panel/usb/audio in *before* screwing your motherboard in. before you actually screw your mobo in, just check what screws fit nicely into the risers. have some zippy ties handy for the cable management side of things..give your back panel a quick squiz to make sure that u dont have to press anything out. most of all, take your time!

goodluck with it and have fun :thumbsup:

EDIT:sry just read the "software" part of your post - xp is straight forward when it comes to installing. pretty much insert the cd(if the hdd is blank, it will auto-boot fromt he cd) and away you go. let it do all the things that it wants to do, enter your cd key, give your pc a name and choose a username, then you are into windows. im sure you know the rest from there :huh:

Edited by 4ward_tristan, 23 October 2007 - 10:51 PM.

=)

#7 Lucky23

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 11:23 PM

Oh cool so its pretty plug and play then. Thats what i wasnt understanding is if i were to put in a new motherboard or build a system, i wasnt sure if there is going to be alot of technical stuff to get it working but if its pretty plug and play then i dont think i will have a problem.
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#8 Lucky23

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 11:29 PM

Yea maybe the new hard drives dont have any software but i just remember when i put a western digital 80gb hdd in my old emachines about 3-4 years ago there was like a hdd setup cd that i think made the computer recognize that there a hdd connected and then after that installs your able to load in windows.

But that was a while ago so i havent done a hdd reciently

What type of motherboards do you guys like and seem to work good with out problems?

What type of processors do you guys like running?
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#9 Lucky23

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 11:30 PM

Oh yea that emachines had windows 98 so maybe thats why i had to use the software cd for the hdd

Also ive read reviews on the motherboards on new egg and some people says that there motherboard was having issues and they updated the bios?

This is mainly why i started this because im not sure how you update the BIOS so i figured if you had to do this then it might be more to building a computer then i thought

Edited by Lucky23, 23 October 2007 - 11:35 PM.

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#10 4ward_tristan

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 01:07 AM

mobos are much of a muchness - most of them nowdays come with the "all solid" capacitors and stuff soo..generally have a high quality of them so to say (cept for the "value" brands IE asrock etc.)

i myself prefer gigabyte, for the fact that their driver installs are a one-click process, and the fact im a sucker for non-regulation component colours (fluro green ide/pcie sockets anyone?)

hhmm, unless you get a oldish type mobo with a new processor (pretty sure the asrock am2nf6g-vsta wont take a athlon 6000+ without a flash), you shouldnt have to flash your bios.

flashing a bios is pretty straight-forward, just try not to have any power outages while you are doing it ^_^. every manufactures website will have all the instructions and utilities needed to flash a bios, so just check your mobos website. generally - make a ms-dos startup disk, copy mobo_flash.exe and flashfile.xx to the floppy and yeah type mobo_flash flashfile.xx and thats it!
=)

#11 Wildabeast

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 02:46 AM

I saw in your 1st post that you have a PCI, not PCI E, if you get a mobo with PCI E your current card will not work in that slot. Also, when installing the mobo use the stand offs, the little things that keep the mobo from touching the case. I've read a few times where someone did not use them and the board was ruined or best case, where the computer did not work.

I don't suggest flashing the BIOS. If everything is working OK, then you don't need to. If you are having problems with your mobo recognizing things or just not working right, then I would flash it. Every time I had to flash, there was a "undo" kind of thing on the disk in case the flash made things worse or didn't work. Make sure you have that, if you flash.

But there are a lot of people who know a lot more than me here, and hopefully they will chime in too..

Good Luck and have fun :thumbsup:
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#12 Sterling14

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 05:24 AM

Haha wildabeast is talking about me with the stand offs :thumbsup: . My first build, I forgot to put the standoffs between the case and board, so the board wasn't working right. It finally died altogether on me which is too bad (takes 3-4 days for newegg to send things you order, but then when you mail them back 8 days, then wait a day or two for processing, then wait 3-4 more days to ship it back it gets pretty lame plus the 12$ to ship them the board back...).

Oh well its a good experience, and its not hard. Everything has different connection types, so you can't plug things in wrong (maybe a few exceptions). Anyways, from the software point on view, its mostly plug and play. When you hook the system up, you just put in the windows disc to install it, and it installs pretty smoothly. Afterwards you might need to put in the disc that came with the motherboard to install drivers for sound, ethernet, usb, etc. There's nothing really to it.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#13 Lucky23

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 11:45 AM

Sweet thats what i couldnt figure out. I was hoping i could just put the computer of my choice together and install windows and then drivers. Thats awsome thanks for the help.
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#14 Lucky23

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 11:51 AM

mobos are much of a muchness - most of them nowdays come with the "all solid" capacitors and stuff soo..generally have a high quality of them so to say (cept for the "value" brands IE asrock etc.)

i myself prefer gigabyte, for the fact that their driver installs are a one-click process, and the fact im a sucker for non-regulation component colours (fluro green ide/pcie sockets anyone?)

hhmm, unless you get a oldish type mobo with a new processor (pretty sure the asrock am2nf6g-vsta wont take a athlon 6000+ without a flash), you shouldnt have to flash your bios.

flashing a bios is pretty straight-forward, just try not to have any power outages while you are doing it ^_^. every manufactures website will have all the instructions and utilities needed to flash a bios, so just check your mobos website. generally - make a ms-dos startup disk, copy mobo_flash.exe and flashfile.xx to the floppy and yeah type mobo_flash flashfile.xx and thats it!


So for someone whos would just build a computer mainly for fun and not interested in overclocking or anything should have to flash Bios?

Is that mainly what bios is for overclocking and tweaking computer speeds?
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#15 Sterling14

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 03:16 PM

You shouldn't have to flash the bios for my most motherboards, unless there's a problem of some sort.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943




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