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Installing A Large Hard Drive!


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#1 trumpetman51

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 10:17 AM

Hey Gang!!

I have been limping along by using old HARD DRIVES on borrowed time. So, I purchased a 320GB Hard Drive. I thought that all i had to do was set it as master or slave, connect it to IDE Cable and GO! I figured I would CLONE my system drive (an OLD 20 GB Generic) on the NEW 320 and then just remove the 20 GB and use the NEW Drive as my system. Maybe even format the old Drive and use it for additional storage.

Well, of course, is ANYTHING EVER EASY???? Of Course Not!!! I physically put the NEW 320GB drive in place, as the slave and then rebooted and ran SETUP (went into my BIOS) to make sure it is recognized. It is recognized all right but ONLY as a 132GB Drive (I'm approximating here). So, SURPRISE!!!! STOP EVERYTHING!!! :thumbsup: What the heck am I going to do NOW?????

My "OLD COMPUTER" is a Micron PC with an Intel 815 Motherboard and a Celeron 900MHz cpu. Somewhere, (I can't remember where right now), I read that I can overcome the 137GB limitation with a couple of tools from Intel. One being the "Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility" and then the "Intel Application Accelerator" AND, in THAT ORDER.

Does anyone know if this is true? OR...is there another way??

If the "Intel way" is true.....I have downloaded the necessary Chipset Software Installation Utility which is called ininst_enu.exe which is a self extracting file and there is an exhaustive README inside that tells all about installing according to Operating System and with or without at least one dozen "FLAGS".

So, now...I am BAFFLED, and I don't know WHAT TO DO!!!

Can ANYBODY HELP ME HERE!!!

Thank You!!

trumpetman51 (John)
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#2 garmanma

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 12:20 PM

You should be able to open up Disk Management and find the new drive and partition and format it to your liking
Is LBA is enabled in the BIOS and SP2 installed?
Mark
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309000

Edited by garmanma, 12 October 2007 - 12:32 PM.

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#3 komski

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 07:30 PM

If the BIOS only supports 48bit LBA then (regardless of the OS having 48bit LBA support) there are a number of workarounds - none of them ideal.

48bit LBA capable host controller PCI card
DDO (Dynamic Drive Overlay) usually from the makers installation/diagnostics utilities.
BIOS upgrade - not without risk
Use the drive in a USB or other external enclosure

#4 trumpetman51

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 07:36 PM

Oh Man, This is NOT Sounding good AT ALL so far!! :huh:

Anybody else know something??

Do you mean to tell me that I wasted my money and time trying to put a 300GB Drive into my computer??

trumpetman :thumbsup:
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#5 komski

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 01:44 AM

I am probably wrong to have stated "(regardless of the OS having 48bit LBA support)" so that makes knowing which OS you are using even more pertinent.

Intel's info:
http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/iaa/sb/cs-009281.htm

The drive is certainly not wasted and at worst could be used OK in an external HDD enclosure.

#6 dc3

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 02:03 AM

If you have XP with SP2 or W2k with SP4 you should be able to access the whole hdd. In the worst case situation you can always make three different partitions to access the whole drive. There is an advantage to having you files and you OS on different partitions, if you every need to reformat the OS you won't have to involve the files on the other partition/s.

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#7 komski

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 06:04 AM

Actually now I think I was right the first time that regardless of the OS you must have a 48bit LBA capable BIOS.

MSKB
By default, the original release version of Windows XP Home Edition and of Windows XP Professional do not have 48-bit LBA support. Your computer must meet the following requirements to use 48-bit LBA ATAPI support:
48-bit LBA-compatible BIOS.
137-GB hard disk or larger.
You must have Windows XP SP1 installed.

and

48bitLBA site
Windows XP supports 48-bit LBA with Service Pack 1. You must also have a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS. The following are the major issues involving 48-bit LBA and Windows XP:

The 48bitLBA site also provides the HDinfo tool to check your BIOS with.

#8 Platypus

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 07:33 AM

The best resolution is to update the BIOS to have 48bit LBA capability. This avoids any reliance on measures installed on the drive itself that depend on the drive being booted from in order to work. ie you can expect other things like imaging or recovery utilities that boot from CD to be able to see the full drive. The board manufacturer must have an updated BIOS available, and there's a small risk of a BIOS update going wrong.

An IDE controller card is very viable. Such a card has its own 48bit LBA capable BIOS. Possible limitations include bus congestion if it's a PCI card & you're also using the PCI bus for sound etc, & ensuring compatability if using an older OS such as Win98.

A DDO (Dynamic Drive Overlay) obtained from the drive manufacturer loads a BIOS patch for 48bit LBA each time the system boots. Loss of 48bit LBA access and consequent possible drive corruption are potential problems if the DDO gets damaged or the system is booted without the DDO e.g. floppy or CD boot.

Driver level support relies on the I/O chipset provider developing 48bit LBA drivers, Intel has their Application Accelerator for several chipsets, AMD also released drivers for some motherboard chipsets. The same restriction applies in that 48bit LBA access is not available unless Windows loads from the drive.

In any of these cases, unless and until 48bit LBA is implemented by some means, it is not possible to access beyond the 28bit LBA limit to create multiple partitions. This is another reason to prefer BIOS update or 48bit IDE controller, as only these two options allow both full drive access for creating partitions during Windows installation, and when not booting from the drive. For example, if you intend to install the Intel Application Accelerator, Windows will have been installed onto a partition of at most 137GB. After the Accelerator install, further partitions will then be able to be created beyond that, or third-party software can be used to expand the existing partition out into unallocated space. If at any time the Accelerator software fails to load when Windows boots up, subsequently created partitions would become unavailable, or a partition that was expanded beyond the 137GB size could become corrupted. As already mentioned, there are sound reasons (including this one) to create more than one partition, rather than having one partition filling the entire drive.

Edited by Platypus, 13 October 2007 - 07:35 AM.

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#9 garmanma

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 07:54 AM

Some motherboards make it pretty easy to flash the BIOS. If you are leery of doing so, there is possibly another option. Providing your BIOS chip is removable, you can send it out and have it flashed for $20. I've used these people in the past with success
biosman.com
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#10 Andrew

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 07:35 PM

I would highly recommend updating the BIOS. According to Intel, the latest version of the BIOS for the D815EEA motherboard is P11, and can be downloaded from here. However, it was released in 2001 so it may not do the trick (but probably will). Check you current BIOS version first.

#11 usasma

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 07:37 PM

FWIW, it's generally not a good idea to jump BIOS versions in great leaps. Most folks suggest doing no more than 2 or 3 versions at a time (so, if you've got version P02 you should update to P05, then P08, then P11)
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