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Does Motherboards Make Your Computer Run Faster?


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#1 phoenix_124

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 04:49 PM

I was hoping to upgrade my HP Pavalion a1520n and have these choices:
Upgrade RAM
Upgrade Graphics
Upgrade Motherboard
Upgrade Power Suppy
Upgrade Processor
I know your just gonna say upgrade all of them but I'm phohibited to doing so.
I thinking to upgrade my power, graphics, and ram, but don't know about motherboards.
Does motherboards speed up your computer. It is either I get a better processor or a motherboard?

A1520n:
AMD ATHLON X2 3800+
1 GB of RAM (2X 512MB)
ASUSTek Computer INC. NAGAMI2 2.00 Motherboard
Nvidia Geforce 6150 LE
300 W power supply

Wish to Upgrade to:
dunno yet for processor (maybe)
2GB of RAM (4X 512MB)
A different motherboard if too horrible for new graphic card (maybe)
Nvidia Geforce 8600GTS or an upcoming 9000 series card
400-450W power supply.
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AMD 64 X2 1GB RAM 2.00GHz

Please note that I will try my best to assist you in this regard...

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 05:16 PM

Upgrading a motherboard can be tricky. If you're wanting to reuse the RAM in your old computer, you have to make sure your new mobo will support it. The same is true with processors, they have to be the same socket, such as a socket 939 processor in a socket 939 capable motherboard. Once the new motherboard is installed, you will most likely have to run the repair command from the OS disc when you boot the PC. I would also suggest a better power supply (500 watts or more) if you plan on going with a GeForce 8 series card. As for the upcoming 9 (G98) series, it will probably not be out for a while. There just is not alot of information about it from reputable sources.

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#3 garmanma

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 05:41 PM

Your motherboard has a PCI express slot. I'd just do memory,video card, and a power supply wouldn't hurt
http://www.crucial.com/ your computer specs.
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#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 05:41 PM

Depending on the goal of the upgrade, memory would be the best place to start. If your upgrading to be able to run DX 10 games you would need to upgrade the lot. The 8600-8800 series cards require a pretty fast system in order not to be bottle necked. Your option in that case would be the motherboard, CPU, Ram, Power supply. As to answer your question Motherboards do effect computer performance since they are directly related to how fast the components communicate with each other. But replacing a motherboard for upgrade purposes would not be cost effective and the results would be minimal if at all.

Edit: just noticed Marks reply, since your board can run PCI-E you can run the faster cards with out upgrading the motherboard and CPU. But you will definatly need a more powerful power supply

Edit: 2 changed PCI-X to PCI-E

Edited by Sneakycyber, 08 October 2007 - 02:25 PM.

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#5 phoenix_124

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 06:46 PM

So that means my board doesn't need to be upgraded? Even though I do have the PCI slot, what does that do, I can fit the card in? I believe I'm fully aware of that ( been researching). But even if I have a PCI slot, will the motherboard slow the speed which the other hardware is giving? Sorry, You may have already explained this, but I not quite understanding. All I now know is that well I can fit my graphics card :D, I need better power supply, and no need for a motherboard upgrade. Any more info will help me.

Thanks alot!

PS: Oh and also, I'm kinda doing this for Vista. I know you really don't recommend me to get it in the first place, but I'm one of the few Vista fans and would love a great experience with it. So recommenations of hardware would also be something I require. Thanks for all your help!

Edited by phoenix_124, 07 October 2007 - 06:48 PM.

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#6 garmanma

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 07:31 PM

Not PCI, PCI Express. That's the latest and greatest for the moment, anyways. That means you have a fairly decent mobo. It supports up to 4 GIGS of memory
Mark
I'd go to HP's site to check on VISTA compatibility

Edited by garmanma, 07 October 2007 - 07:42 PM.

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#7 Mr Alpha

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 11:26 AM

A quick overlook over PCI & Co.
  • PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) is the old one from 1995, which in computer years is practically prehistoric. It is limited to 133 MB/s, which by modern standards is really slow, and is slowly being phased out.
  • PCI-X (Peripheral Component Interconnect Extended) is a faster version of PCI mainly found in servers and does not concern us.
  • AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) was designed based on the PCI technology but with higher bandwidth specifically for graphics cards. With a bandwidth of 266 MB/s to 2133 MB/s for AGP x1 to AGP x8 respectively.
  • Now PCIe/PCI-E which is replacing both PCI and AGP. It shares nothing with PCI but the name and purpose (port for connecting add-in cards). Technologically it is far different. Comes in several sizes: from PCIe x1, with a bandwidth of 500 MB/s, up to PCIe x32, with a bandwidth of 16384 MB/s. Graphics cards now use a PCIe x16 slot, with a bandwidth of 4000 MB/s. There is a PCIe 2.0 on the way with double the bandwidth.
Your motherboard has a PCIe x16 so it supports all the latest graphics cards.

Performance difference between motherboards for AMD processors is non-existent because the memory controller is built into the processor itself.
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#8 Sneakycyber

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 02:24 PM

I never associated a Difference between PCI-X and PCI-E. Must make a mental note of it. :thumbsup:

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#9 phoenix_124

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 03:47 PM

Thanks for the info!
I have a question. Since I now know that I have a PCI-E slot, you mentioned that CPU doesn't require an upgrade along with the motherboard. How does CPU involve with the PCI-E slot? Why if I have the PCI-E slot, I don't need the upgrade of CPU?
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#10 Sneakycyber

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 05:50 PM

You can upgrade the CPU, but its not necessary to be able to run the newer graphics card. If you didn't have a PCI-E slot you would need to purchase a new motherboard that is compatible with your CPU and has a PCI-E slot. You didn't necessarily have to buy a new CPU just to upgrade to a newer Graphics card. I recommended a CPU upgrade because the fastest graphics cards on the market if you wanted to buy them IE: the 8800 Ultra From Nvidia would be bottle necked by a slower CPU so it wouldn't be worth the 400+ price tag. Your Processor should be fine. You can pick up a Geforce 8600 or 8500 for less then 200 bucks, or an ATI equivalent.

Edit: grammer

Edited by Sneakycyber, 08 October 2007 - 05:51 PM.

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#11 phoenix_124

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 09:32 PM

Thanks for the great info!
For CPU upgrade: lol. Well I was hoping to upgrade CPU for both Vista and the graphics card. I don't know if my processor is fast enough for Vista... Does my graphics help my processor. I know Vista runs on GPU now but I want Vista on my PC and want it to play games as fast as my XP.

Anyways, thanks for all that info. I learned alot and it is completely revelent to what I require to know for upgrade.
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#12 garmanma

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 07:40 AM

Upgrade you computer, then run this
Vista upgrade tool
It will let you know if you can. I wouldn't get Vista until the first service pack release. The REAL one, not the BETA
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#13 Sneakycyber

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 08:58 AM

Tomshardware just recently compared Nvidia and ATI's graphics cards under Direct X 10 and with ATI's latest catalyst software. If your planning on upgrading to Vista and running DX10 games you should Really read This article.

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#14 phoenix_124

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 04:02 PM

Well about the Upgrade Advisor. It just states that AMD Athlon Dual Core 3800+ works. But how good is it? It may work but it may be super slow? Or is it good for gaming in Vista? All the Advisor said was... It works :D.

Thanks for the replys guys!
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#15 garmanma

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 04:26 PM

http://www.tomshardware.com/ Review and benchmarking of your CPU
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