Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Norton Autofix Tool-- When To Use It


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 lliztiz

lliztiz

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:California
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 01 October 2007 - 01:04 AM

Despite having NIS 2007, a number of trojans and malware got through. This made me wonder whether my security software was operating as it should be. I remembered reading about Norton AutoFix, and that running it would tell me if the components of the Norton program were working as they should be. I tried to download and run it, but was unable to do so. So, I chatted on-line with a Norton Tech person in India. She insisted that if there were a problem with NIS, that the Norton symbol in the tray bar would have a red cross through it. I told her that it did not, that it always indicated that NIS was working properly, but that I did not know if I could trust that that was true since Norton was failing to detect what other scanners were catching. I told her about the AutoFix tool and asked her to run it for me remotely, since I couldn't do it. She insisted repeatedly that that tool would not test whether my software was compromised-- that if it were, the software program itself would indicate this with the red "X" mark. I don't know what to believe now. Can anyone tell me if the AutoFix tool would be of help to me, or should I just trust that all is well as long as Norton indicates that it is. Thanks to anyone who can clarify this for me.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,140 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:02:44 PM

Posted 01 October 2007 - 08:36 AM

The Symantec AutoFix Tool automatically finds and fixes common issues.

AutoFix Tool

However, when trying to download it, I received an error so it may be that the tool was pulled by Symantec and no longer available or that I cannot proceed because I am not using any Norton products.

Despite having NIS 2007, a number of trojans and malware got through

No single product is 100% foolproof and can detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new malware infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes spyware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus provides the most complete protection.

Edited by quietman7, 01 October 2007 - 08:37 AM.

.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#3 lliztiz

lliztiz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:California
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 01 October 2007 - 03:11 PM

I neglected to mention that I have a number of tools to prevent infection besides NIS. They are: SpyWare Blaster, Spyware Doctor v5, Webroot Spy Sweeper, Sophos Anti-Root Kit. However, I was only using NIS when the nasty critters invaded. I am pretty confident I will not get infected now. However, what I worry about is whether NIS was compromised during the attack. For example, recently, when I tried to do a BitDefender on-line scan, I noticed that NIS disappeared from the task bar, and perhaps was shut down. I unistalled and re-installed NIS after the system had been infected, just in case. When I tried to enter my key, it would not let me-- it only permitted 3 letters per entry box, when 4 are required. So, I uninstalled and reinstalled it again. That time I was able to do so. Everything looks good, but if there was a way to independently verify that, it would be nice. I thought that Norton Autofix could do that. It sounds like you are agreeing that I don't need to do so. If that is the case, I will trust all is well. Thank you.

#4 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,140 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:02:44 PM

Posted 01 October 2007 - 05:26 PM

Your welcome. :thumbsup:
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#5 hanyacottman

hanyacottman

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:44 PM

Posted 11 November 2010 - 11:31 PM

I tried to download the tool from quietman's link but there seems to be a problem from my end. I'm getting this message: We cannot test your computer unless your computer has: Internet Explorer Version 5.5 or later Security settings that allow ActiveX controls and JavaScript Windows 98/2000/Me/XP operating system 250-MHz processor or higher 32 MB of memory or more I think I meet all the criteria above except for the second one, cause I'm not sure how my security settings are configured. Tried googling it though and got this alternative source for symantec autofix tool. Just thought of sharing for those who got stuck like me.

Edited by elise025, 12 November 2010 - 09:28 AM.
Deactivated link ~ Elise


#6 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,140 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:02:44 PM

Posted 12 November 2010 - 08:30 AM

Welcome to BC hanyacottman

Please be aware that you replied to a topic which is over 3 years old. The information I provided was based on Symantec resources available at that time and may not pertain to current users of Norton products.

Since then Symantec has changed many of their url links so they are redirected elsewhere or no longer valid. Further, Symanted has released information about AutoFix Support Tool ActiveX Control Vulnerabilities

This article was last modified on 09/28/2006:

The AutoFix Tool is a feature on the Symantec Web site that detects problems on your computer and provides you with information on solutions to those problems. To detect problems, the AutoFix Tool uses small programs called controls, including an ActiveX® control...

AutoFix Tool security compliance

The link you provided recommends users to use RegCure as a solution instead of Symantec's AutoFix Tool.

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

:step1: Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

:step2: Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

:step3: Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

:step4: Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

:step5: The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#7 Romeo29

Romeo29

    Learning To Bleep


  • BC Advisor
  • 3,194 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:127.0.0.1
  • Local time:01:44 PM

Posted 14 November 2010 - 01:29 AM

Norton Auto-Fix tool fixes your Symantec products related problems (like Norton anti-virus auto-protect not running on start up etc.) It is only for people who have Symantec products installed.

From http://www.symantec.com/avcenter/security/Content/2008.04.02a.html (from May 2008)

An updated (non-vulnerable) version of the AutoFix tool will be automatically installed if customers participate in an online Chat session with Symantec Technical Support.
Customers can also download and install an updated AutoFix Tool here: http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/asa/ctrl/SymADataWeb.msi


Since it uses ActiveX controls, it should be run inside Internet Explorer only. This article from Symantec tells how to fix a problem using AutoFix tool in Step 4.

Edited by Romeo29, 14 November 2010 - 01:36 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users