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How To Protect Networking Equipment From Surges


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7 replies to this topic

#1 JohnDubya

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:06 PM

We are in a small office environment, and we have a cable modem connection going into a router then into a patch bay and the rest of our network. We had a lightning storm two weeks ago, and lightning hit our building and fried our cable modem and the WAN port of our router. We have all the power supplies connected to a surge protector, but evidentally, the surge got through to our equipment somehow. How can we protect from this happening again? Do you guys think the surge could have gone through the coaxial cable into the modem and fried it and then somehow traveled through the cable modem into the ethernet cable and fried the WAN port? Only the WAN port stopped working...not any others. Also, the cable modem still had the power light on, but it wouldn't connect anymore, which is why I believe that the surge came through the cable and not the power. Any suggestions on how to protect our equipment? Do we need to invest in a coaxial surge protector? Thanks for any help you can provide us!

Edited by JohnDubya, 04 September 2007 - 12:07 PM.


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#2 jhsmurray

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:15 PM

You're probably best off using surge protectors that offer protection on other types of cables besides just electrical ones. Just because its an electrical surge doesnt mean it only goes through electrical wires. I just bought a Belkin SP and they offer a damage reimbursement program (going to fill out the registration card now :thumbsup: )

Apart from that, have you tried doing a manual reset of the router and modem? It'll be something like a small button on the back.

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#3 JohnDubya

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:41 PM

Thanks for the reply, jhsmurray.

We already have an APC battery backup / surge protector hooked up with the cable modem, router, and server computer. Since that is the case and since that APC doesn't have cable or ethernet inputs on it, should we buy an additional coax surge protector alone or do we also need an ethernet surge protector? Or should we scrap the APC and find a "surge protector / battery backup / coax and ethernet surge protector" all in one?

#4 DaChew

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 01:42 PM

I would investigate the grounding used, I had similar problems with sensitive electronic equipment until I improved my grounding. Any signal surge protector can only protect so much without interfering with the signal. Telco techs just laughed at me about surge protectors, an EE and an electrician told me to improve the ground.
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#5 usasma

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 07:31 AM

Surge protection at a business is a big $ issue. At my wife's office, we surge protect the cable internet where it comes into the building, then we surge protect it again where it goes into the cable modem. We also surge protect the ethernet connection from the cable modem to the router - then we have ethernet surge protection on each of the computers in the office (except the laptops). We do this by buying surge suppressors with both ethernet and power surge protection built in. The one that protects the modem and router has all 3 built into it.
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#6 Layback Bear

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 08:08 AM

I have two surge protectors in series for internet,A/c power; and I hoping it will help against lightning. I have a friend where lightning went down the phone line and melted his protector and went right through it. I cooked his computer and shot through the wall and hit his cast iron bath tub.

#7 DaChew

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 10:06 AM

hit his cast iron bath tub.


huge potential voltage looking for a good ground

cable, telephone and power should all have excellent grounds to at least minimize the damage from a drect hit

old timers used to ground electrical to a grounding rod and splice over to copper or galvanized water line, pvc lines
ruined that
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#8 JohnDubya

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 10:49 AM

Awesome, thanks for the replies, guys. Great suggestions, I appreciate it!




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