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Building A Computer


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#1 shortyman

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Posted 27 August 2007 - 09:12 PM

I am in the process of building a computer and i am ready to turn it on and enter the BIOS. I hit the power button and the fan spins or a few seconds then shuts off and does nothing. All lights turn on also. Any help would be great!

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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 04:39 PM

Make sure the motherboard is not grounding out on the case.. Remove the motheboard from the computer and make sure all the stand-offs are in the proper place. You can also remove the MB and leave the processor, memory, and video installed on the board and power it up on your desk. If it turns on its shorting inside the case. Also what all is installed in the computer? Your power supply may be too small.

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#3 shortyman

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 09:12 PM

all i got is a MB, CPU, Ram, HDD, DVD/RW, CD, and video card... and i got a 430 volt power supply

#4 dribdrab

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 09:52 PM

Found this on another forum,posted to show more detailed steps.build problems


How Much Power Do You Need? Had this tucked away in my files saved for when I was planing to build.

Component Requirement Line(s) Used
AGP Video Card 30 – 50W +3.3V
Average PCI Card 5 – 10W +5V
10/100 NIC 4W +3.3V
SCSI Controller PCI Card 20W +3.3V and +5V
Floppy Drive 5W +5V
CD-ROM 10 – 25W +5V and +12V
DVD-ROM 10 – 25W +5V and +12V
CD-RW 10 – 25W +5V and +12V
7200rpm IDE Hard Drive 5 – 20W +5V and +12V
10,000rpm SCSI Drive 10 – 40W +5V and +12V
Case/CPU Fans 3W (ea.) +12V
Motherboard (w/o CPU or RAM) 25 – 40W +3.3V and +5V
RAM 8W per 128MB +3.3V
Pentium III Processor 38W +5V
Pentium 4 Processor 70W +12V
AMD Athlon Processor 70W +12V

For overall power supply wattage, add the requirement for each device in your system, then multiply by 1.8. (The multiplier takes into account that today’s systems draw disproportionally on the +12V output. Furthermore, power supplies are more efficient and reliable when loaded to 30% - 70% of maximum capacity.)

Edited by dribdrab, 28 August 2007 - 09:55 PM.


#5 phawgg

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 11:25 PM

Nice list, dribdrab.

Its helpful to see what the combined effect of various devices has on the overall power consumption, thanks
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#6 Mr Alpha

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 06:57 AM

Component Requirement Line(s) Used
AGP Video Card 30 – 50W +3.3V
Average PCI Card 5 – 10W +5V
10/100 NIC 4W +3.3V
SCSI Controller PCI Card 20W +3.3V and +5V
Floppy Drive 5W +5V
CD-ROM 10 – 25W +5V and +12V
DVD-ROM 10 – 25W +5V and +12V
CD-RW 10 – 25W +5V and +12V
7200rpm IDE Hard Drive 5 – 20W +5V and +12V
10,000rpm SCSI Drive 10 – 40W +5V and +12V
Case/CPU Fans 3W (ea.) +12V
Motherboard (w/o CPU or RAM) 25 – 40W +3.3V and +5V
RAM 8W per 128MB +3.3V
Pentium III Processor 38W +5V
Pentium 4 Processor 70W +12V
AMD Athlon Processor 70W +12V

A few updates, since this list is a little out of date.
  • PCIe video cards eat 20 - 180W of mainly 12V power. The PCIe slots itself deliverers a maximum of 75W, so graphics cards without PCIe power connector eat less than that.
  • 7200 rpm drives are under 15W nowadays and that's only when spinning up.
  • RAM isn't 8W per 128MB, rather 8W per stick, and DDR2 eats less power at 7W per stick, still 3.3V. DDR3 promises to use even less.
  • Some high-end processors eat readily over 100W, all 12V. PSU often have a separate 12V rail only for the processor.
  • PCI card with molex connectors eat more power than that.
Overclocking can add 50% to the power draw of the CPU, RAM and motherboard.

For overall power supply wattage, add the requirement for each device in your system, then multiply by 1.8. (The multiplier takes into account that today’s systems draw disproportionally on the +12V output. Furthermore, power supplies are more efficient and reliable when loaded to 30% - 70% of maximum capacity.)

Power supplies are nowadays designed with the disproportionate reliance on 12V power in mind, so you do not need to take this into account. I usually multiply by 1.3 to get is inside the 30%-70% sweet-spot. Remember that around 20% and lower the efficiency start taking a nosedive so you don't want to big a PSU.
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#7 shortyman

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 11:58 AM

I have a good power supply then.... i still havent figured the problem out yet

#8 Sneakycyber

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 02:38 PM

Did you try my suggestion?

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#9 shortyman

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 06:36 PM

yes... that didnt help

#10 Sneakycyber

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 05:05 AM

Have you tried getting the computer to post with just the ram, video and CPU? If the motheboard has onboard video try without the video card and see if it will post. Also make sure you have made all the proper power connections including the 4 pin cpu connector, double check the ram and make sure its seated properly. Are you trying Dual channel DDR? try it in Standard mode and see if that will work.

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#11 shortyman

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 01:11 PM

i tried all that and still doesnt work. i spose its a bad mobo

#12 Sneakycyber

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 02:46 PM

If its a new board RMA it, If its a E-bay board try and get your components tested either in a friends computer or at a shop. IMO its the motherboard but you should always double check its cheaper to test components then to replace one that is good.

Chad Mockensturm 

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Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#13 shortyman

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 11:03 AM

I took the computer to a repair shop and they told me that it was a bad board because there was a sodder joint that wasnt quite right so it wasnt putting out the full 12v that it should.

#14 Sneakycyber

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 03:25 PM

So you have replaced it? and it works?

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#15 shortyman

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 04:02 PM

Yes it works great! Awesome motherboard and great system




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