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Building My Own Computer


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#1 monkpart9

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Posted 06 August 2007 - 09:50 PM

Is building your own computer something that takes years of experience kinda thing? I mean that actually sounds like a pretty good idea, but I wouldnt know where to start, I mean where to get the supplies or how to put it together, well I mean if it was a simple plug in wires or connect hardware kinda thing I guess I could do that as long as the process doesn't involve sodering (however you spell it) or anything like that. Can anyone show me maybe a tutorial or where to start?
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

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#2 Budapest

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 01:44 AM

Here is a site to get you started:

Build Easy PC

The first thing you need to think about is what do you want to use this computer for. Do you just want to surf the net and check your email? Do you want to run the latest 3D games? Or, do you want to do some video editing? It will make a difference to the type of hardware you will need.

If you have any questions just post back - the members here at Bleeping Computer will be happy to help you out.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

—George Bernard Shaw

#3 Sterling14

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 07:35 AM

I've put a computer together, and it was so much easier then putting together one of those car models designed for 10 year olds :thumbsup: . It took only about and hour an a half to 2 hours. Even if you don't know a lot about computers, retail motherboards always come with step by step instruction. It's really not much cheaper then if you can find a good computer on sale, especially if its a combo with a monitor, but you get to customize it more. You can get any kind of case you want, not just the same old Dell cases that everyone you know has. Also, on site's like Dell, they usually only give you a couple options for each part. Building your own, the skies the limit!

If you need any help or any questions, their are many friendly, and knowledgeable people on this forum that would be glad too!
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#4 jgweed

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 08:08 AM

Sterling14 is quite right. Most of the work is putting the various components in place and connecting them together properly. Usually you get very detailed instructions and manuals with the parts you buy. Small fingers, a few tools, and a little patience is all you really need.
The great thing is---in addition to being able to brag to your friends that you actually built it yourself---is that you can get brand name parts and tailor your computer to what you use it for; and for much less than getting a pre-built one off the shelf.
You can also pirate some of the components from your old computer if you need to save money.
Cheers,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#5 XilStorm

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 01:16 PM

Building a computer takes no skill.

Getting it to work efficiently and quitely does.

no, not years, just keep an eye on some forums, you learn alot.


www.newegg.com
^ The god site for computer parts

and no, no soldering unless you really want to mod the computer.
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#6 monkpart9

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 03:13 PM

Thank you everyone, this really has helped ALOT, I mean for one thing it really has boosted my confidence in myself that I'll be able to build a computer myself. If anyone could include a list of the basic things that I need to start building (a checklist type thing) than that would be great too.
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

#7 BlackSpyder

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 05:08 PM

List of gooddies to buy:
1)ATX Case (always buy new 2 PC's are better than 1)
2)Motherboard and CPU Combo kit (they usually come cheaper this way)
3)Matching RAM for motherboard
4)New Hard Drive
5)New DVD drive
6)1 Floppy Drive (these things still come in handy)
7)Video Card (unless you just bought one)
8)Sound Card
9)Windows XP Pro or other OS (Vista isnt worth the hassel right now)
10) Power Supply Unit that will power it all
11)Ethernet card/Modem
12)Case Fans

Optional Stuff and notes:
1)Cases dont have to be pretty (the more pretty they are the more green you'll spend) I suggest a Full ATX case (more room for later add -ons and fans)
2)CPU should be a Dual Core at least, Make sure the Mother board supports at least 4 GB RAM (extends the life of the PC)(also full ATX mother boards offer more expansion slots)
3)1 GB minimum now-a-days (you can get by with 512MB but you'll be wanting more soon)
4 & 9)Adding a new HDD and install of Windows makes it easier on you. But If need be you can scavenge your old one and format it and do a fresh install (Might also think about a RAID setup)
5)A new DVD drive will keep you from opening the system up 2 weeks after building it because your old one failed (been there done that, not a pleasant time)
6-8) Optional but useful, Onboard sound and Video are nice but Cards are better (Onboard video will not supply many games now) and an FDD is always useful. (or maybe its just me)
11) New modem and/or Ethernet card (or just rob your old PC if your not going to connect to the internet with it any more)
12) Buy many many case fans (if your case doesnt come with them, If it does add more) You want to keep this thing cool. If you're going to use a video card get a PCI slot fan to help cool it


And if you get to confused you can always ask here (someones bound to have done it before)

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#8 XilStorm

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 05:25 PM

you don't need an ethernet card usually...it is usually built in

make sure your power supply is BIG


I agree with everything else
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#9 monkpart9

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 06:08 PM

Quite helpfull indeed a couple things though:


1. Which piece of equipment holds the memory again? I'm looking to build a computer with about 120 GB of it.

2. Will any of this stuff include instructions? I mean I would have no idea where to install case fans, or a power suply cord.

3. Other than number 2 is putting most of this stuff together just common sense?
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

#10 DJBPace07

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 06:21 PM

You won't be able to get 120 GB of RAM, but you can get a hard drive that has about that capacity. Both hard drives and RAM plug into your motherboard. Most new parts will include instructions, but pay close attention to the one that comes with the motherboard as incorrect placement of certain components could be disastrous. The mobo instruction manual will show you where to plug in everything and how to up the BIOS. Many of the plugs in a modern computer are designed in such a way as to prevent incorrect installation. I've replaced almost everything in a computer and it's a little overwhelming the first time, but once you do it, you'll realize just how easy it can be. Once you have figured out what hardware you want to use, post it here and we'll gladly make suggestions.

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#11 monkpart9

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 09:12 PM

Hmm,thats a little more reasuring, thanks DJBPace07.


Ive noticed that these parts that i need are pretty costly, I mean I didnt Think a case could cause like 100$, I mena are these parts needed to build a computer this expensive usually or am I just looking in the wrong place?
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

#12 T

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 09:24 PM

Just look at newegg, get to the catergory you want then hit sort by best rating. This is pretty much where you want to look. Ratings on newegg are very reliable IMO.

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#13 Andrew

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 11:16 PM

As a consummate PC parts scavenger, let me make some cost-cutting recommendations.

First, the case. While it may be handy to buy a new case, sometimes the price is prohibitive. So, your old case may be the way to go. CAUTION: many off-the-shelf PC's (Dell, HP, etc) use nonstandard cases and parts. So, if you use your old case, make sure that it's ATX compliant.
You can also scrounge a case. Look on ebay, your local craigslist, and other places for cheap cases or old computers that you can buy for pennies and use their case. Some Goodwill stores sell computers, but I've never seen them sell cases. Worth a look, though. I just bought a sweet Alienware case off of craigslist for $20.

Find a local PC parts store (not a chain place like CompUSA, but a small operation) and see what they have to offer. There's one about a mile from my apartment that I love. I've bought new OEM DVD burners and motherboards there for cheap. Example: my DVD burner cost me $35 new.

Power supply: Here's one part that you really don't want to skimp on. I've had bad things happen when using used/old power supplies with my new equipment (long story short, I had to get newer new equipment). Also, make sure that the power supply has the proper plugs for the motherboard and hardware. All PC parts use the standard Molex plugs, but there are different sizes. For example, hard drives and CD/DVD drives use a standard 4-pin plug, whereas fans tend to use the smaller 3-pin plugs. All power supplies have both, but you don't want to run out of plugs! Also, check to see whether your motherboard uses a 20-pin connector or a 24 pin connector to the power supply. Most boards these days use 24 pin sockets, but you may find a 20 pin out there. Good power supplies usually have the ability to connect to either kind.

Video/sound/other cards. Check what kind of connection they use and make sure that the motherboard has enough of them. Most medium priced boards give you 5 or more PCI slots, and 2 or more PCI-E slots. Most newer video cards use PCI-E while most other cards still use PCI. I'd avoid AGP video cards as fewer and fewer motherboards support AGP anymore.

By far the hardest part of building your own PC is actually getting the various parts. It takes a little research to make sure everything will go smoothly, but once that's done assembly is really quite simple. Just remember: If it doesn't fit in the socket, it probably doesn't go there!

#14 monkpart9

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 12:14 AM

Hmm, thanks amazing andrew, You also brought up one of my main concerns, which is the specifics. I mean when people mention Compatability with other parts it just gets me so worried and makes me want to abandon this whole project. Is there any way I can get more knowledgable about the types of parts out there or any solution to this problem?
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

#15 Budapest

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 12:39 AM

I think that at this point you should start to pick out some specific hardware (for example: ASUS P5N32-E SLI Plus Motherboard, Sapphire RADEON 9600 Pro 128 MB AGP Graphics Card). Post your choices back here and the members can give you guidance on whether the various parts are compatible.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

—George Bernard Shaw




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