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Power Supply Blew Up During Build - Now What?


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#1 Pix_Z

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Posted 04 August 2007 - 05:18 PM

Hi,

I was working on a building a new system. Had the mobo, CPU, PSU, RAM, and video card hooked up. Turned it on to test, and a heard a pop, then a spark came from the 20+4 plug. (Specifically, the 4 pin connection.) So now what? Obviously, the PSU is bad. Did it most likely ruin my mobo, too? What about everything else on the mobo? Is it possible for that some of the components were damaged, but in a way that wouldn't show up immediately? Should I return all my components? I'd like to get some advice before doing anything else.

Thanks.

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#2 Dark Lord Valkrest

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Posted 04 August 2007 - 06:12 PM

Well there is a good chance you did damage the motherboard and other components and good chance things could work fine now and in a few days to months crap out on you. . I would see if the mobo posts on it's own. Then I would test the other components on a seperate system, that is, if you want to take the risk of things crapping out on you later . On the other hand you could take it all back and demand new parts for them selling you a faulty pwr supply and demand the pay for you lost valuble time and effort, I would believe this is the safest thing to do to prevent future problems with your new system. I hope that when you were building this you didn't put it all together and turn it on - parts should be installed one at a time.

Edited by Dark Lord Valkrest, 04 August 2007 - 06:20 PM.


#3 dc3

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Posted 04 August 2007 - 08:28 PM

Hi Pix_Z, and welcome to BleepingComputer.

It sounds like there is a chance that you had a short between the case and the motherboard, try taking the motherboard out and placing it on a piece of cardboard or a phone book and assemble the components on that and see if it will power up without the fireworks. If it does then you know that you are shorting to the case with the motherboard, you may need to use standoffs to isolate the board from the case.

If you are diligent about your assembly of your computer there is no reason not to assemble all of your parts before powering it up, however, if you have problems try starting with the motherboard and adding components one at a time, this can help determine if you have a component that isn't working.

I wouldn't assume that the PSU is dead, or any other components, give it a try and see, it won't hurt anything. I would visually inspect the motherboard for any burn marks or lifted traces off the board, if there aren't any...try what I have suggested.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 Pix_Z

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 12:42 AM

If I assemble out of the case, the CPU fan and the video card fan do turn on, but I get no video. I put back into the case using standoffs and connecting the speaker, and got this:

--Using CPU, mobo, PSU, and RAM, everything starts momentarily, then after about 3-5 seconds powers down.
--Using CPU, mobo, PSU only, everything powers on and I get one long, continuous beep. It stops after awhile, and then repeatedly cycles through the long, continuous beep.

I believe my mobo uses AMI BIOS, in which case the POST beep codes are supposed to vary.

Should I suspect the RAM since it seems to be a show stopper?

#5 Sneakycyber

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 10:40 AM

According to the AMIBIOS-codes.pdf Your memory is bad, or the motherboard is bad and its giving you a false post code ( I personally haven't seen a false post code). Make sure the memory is properly seated and in the correct slots ( some motherboards are picky where you place the ram ). If you have access to another computer you could try the components in another computer as Dark Lord Valkrest mentioned. If you bought the parts from a retail outlet see if they will test the parts for you they may be leary about replacing the parts since it may have been damaged and not defective. If its a reputable shop they should replace them no questions asked.

~Chad~

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#6 dc3

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 10:58 AM

Did you apply thermal compound to the CPU heat spreader before attaching the heat sink and fan assembly?

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#7 Pix_Z

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 11:26 AM

I seated and reseated the RAM several times. The CPU came with thermal paste (retail box). I checked that the heat sink and fan assembly were correctly flush with against the mobo or appropriate parts (jeez, the heat sink/fan enclosure needed pressure; I was hoping that LGA775's would be an easier than earlier CPUs, but I guess no relief. I hate installing CPUs...). The plastic shield that was against the thermal paste was removed. The little pegs from the enclosure attachments are poking through the mobo on the other side, looks OK, but this my first LGA775.

#8 Pix_Z

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 11:28 AM

I should also add that I removed and then reinstalled the battery to set CMOS to default.

#9 Pix_Z

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 11:32 AM

Also double checked my memory placement. Everything comes out the same -- a long beep.

#10 Dark Lord Valkrest

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 05:12 PM

Sounds Like your mobo's shot. or you could try just 1 stick of ram -- try it once in every slot but be sure to only use one stick. If the long beep changes... two short beeps or two short followed by a slightly longer beep -- could just mean a type of memory problem...if your lucky.

Edited by Dark Lord Valkrest, 05 August 2007 - 05:17 PM.


#11 Pix_Z

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 08:44 PM

I swapped out both RAM and video card just to be sure, still the same--a long beep if no RAM and power down if RAM is present, so the next biggest suspect is the mobo. I'll swap that out as soon as I can get a hold of one.

Are there any signs I should look out for as far as the CPU? How does one tell if a CPU is dead? I suppose if I swap out the mobo and it still doesn't come up, the CPU is the only thing left, but I'd like to know if there's any other symptoms.

#12 Sneakycyber

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 09:26 PM

It post without the ram with a single long beep ( no memory installed ) and it shuts down with the memory installed ( Using known good modules ). Sounds like the motherboard more and more. The only way to tell if a motherboard is dead is by swapping it in a good system or maybe using a Diagnostic card ( the board has to work somewhat to use a diag card ). Same for the CPU, Although if you can't get into a Post screen with a video card installed the board is most likely dead.

Chad Mockensturm 

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#13 Pix_Z

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Posted 12 August 2007 - 01:31 AM

Thanks for everyone's suggestions. I swapped out the mobo and now I have video.




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