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Questions About Avg Anti-spyware Free


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#1 bloomcounty

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 12:08 PM

Hi,

When I get my new replacement laptop, I'm going to be installing AVG Anti-Spyware Free and probably just turning off the real-time protection from the start and just using it as a scanner (to save myself needing to remember to do it and in case the real-time stuff causes me any problems/conflicts/etc. -- I'd rather avoid it). I have the instructions on how to do this from here:
http://www.castlecops.com/t137442-AVG_ANTI...structions.html
(thanks, quietman7!)

1. Does it matter when I turn off the real-time protection and turn it into a scanner, in relation to when I'm installing other programs, etc.? (I'll install ZA first, then AVG A/V Free, then probably this (turning off the real-time protection), then Ad-Aware and Spybot.)

2. Reading the instructions for AVG Antispyware Free, I see that part of the program has settings to turn off various things or change settings in Windows through the program itself. Some of these things are things that I normally do on my own in Windows.

2a. If the program is turning off something in Windows or changing a setting, will Windows actually reflect that change when you look at the setting in Windows (or will it still look like it's turned on -- and then turning it off there would actually be turning it on because it's turned off in the AVG program?).

2b. Is this part of the program that allows you to do this (I think it's in the advanced settings) disabled once you turn it into a stand-alone scanner (and turn off the real-time stuff)?

3. If you keep on the real-time stuff and the 30-days runs out, what happens if you leave the "Guard Service" running after the 30-day trial period, and don't do the instructions in the link above to change the program to only a stand-alone scanner? Does that part still work?

3a. What is that? Why would you want to turn that part off after the trail-period?

4. Anything else I should know about this program?

Thanks! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

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#2 jgweed

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 10:18 AM

1. No. I might suggest leaving it on until the free period expires, though. You can make the change at your convenience.
2. I think it is a very good idea to have ONE place or ONE application that you use to control Windows (for example, start up applications) rather than use a bunch of applications for making changes, and then have to remember where you made the change. I have not touched the "Tools" section, if that is what you are referring to.
2a. I am not sure.
2b. No.
3. Yes, the stand alone service continues to work, and you can perform a manual scan at any time.
3.a What do you mean by "what is that."
4. Keep it updated.
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#3 bloomcounty

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 10:48 AM

Thanks for the replies! A few more follow-up questions:

No. I might suggest leaving it on until the free period expires, though. You can make the change at your convenience.

5. Leaving it on doesn't have any conflict or weird setting issue with Zone Alarm 6.5.737, does it? (That's the ZA I'll be using...) Is there anything "special" you need to do/set in ZA if you have AVG Antispyware doing its realtime monitoring?

I think it is a very good idea to have ONE place or ONE application that you use to control Windows (for example, start up applications) rather than use a bunch of applications for making changes, and then have to remember where you made the change. I have not touched the "Tools" section, if that is what you are referring to.

6. So then it doesn't automatically turn off/on anything in Windows by just installing the program? All Windows settings would still be however you have them set prior to installing the program?

6a. So if I'm going to make any changes to Windows (via msconfig or anyplace else), is it better to do those things before or after installing AVG Antispyware?

6b. Is it better to do those before installing any programs? Before creating my two logons? Before the initial Windows updates? Or does it not matter?

Yes, the stand alone service continues to work, and you can perform a manual scan at any time.

7. What I'm asking here is, in the instructions you posted at that link, it tells you to turn off the "Guard Service" when you turn the program into a stand-alone scanner, is that right? It says that after the trail period, or after you turn off the real-time stuff yourself:

However, the guard service will remain running and you will need to complete the instructions above starting from step four.


7a. So what is the "Guard Service" and why do you turn it off? Especially if it still works? That's the part I don't understand... I'm probably just misunderstanding something...

Thanks! Looking forward to hearing back! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#4 bloomcounty

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 10:00 AM

Actually, I didn't mean to say the instructions "you" posted at that link, but the ones that quietman7 did.

So any more info on any of this stuff? (And I answered your question you asked above as well...)

Thanks again! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#5 quietman7

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 01:22 PM

The newest version of AVGAS requires guard.exe to be running at all times. After the trial period guard.exe will no longer provide real-time protection but it will still be running and provide the necessary functionality for AVGAS scan and update. In previous versions, this was not the case and the Guard Service could be disabled to save resources.

peter.ewido wrote:

guard.exe absolutely needs to be running in the new version. Some of the main functionality like cleaning, analysis tools etc. had to be outsourced from avgas.exe to guard.exe. If you stop guard.exe after avgas.exe has been started, the analysis tools will stop working, you will not be able to clean/delete files etc...this cannot be changed... Core functionality has been outsourced to guard.exe, that means even things like update and cleaning are now being performed by the "guard". The application itself simply does not have enough access rights.


I will update the instructions first chance I get. In the meantime, to disable real-time protection and use AVG Anti-Spyware as a stand-alone scanner before or after the trial period ends, do this:
  • Launch AVG Anti-Spyware.
  • From the "Status" menu, select "Change state" to inactivate 'Resident Shield' and 'Automatic Updates'.
  • Then right click on AVG Anti-Spyware in the system tray and uncheck "Start with Windows".
Note: If the trial period has already expired, the Resident Shield and Automatic Updates will automatically be inactivated and the program will no longer run at startup.
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#6 bloomcounty

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 01:37 PM

Thanks, quietman! Leave the guard service on -- gotcha!

Do you happen to know the answers to the questions in my second post? (Questions #5 through #7?)

jgweed, are you still around?

Thanks again! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#7 quietman7

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 08:27 PM

5. I'm not aware of any reported conflicts with ZA. There should not be anything "special" which you need to do with ZA while AVGAS is running.

6. Installing AVGAS does not affect normal Windows settings.

6a. You can make changes before or after installation.

Note: MSConfig is a troubleshooting utility used to diagnose system configuration issues. Although it works as a basic startup manager which allows you to enable/disable auto-start programs, msconfig should not be used routinely to disable startup programs. Further, msconfig does not allow you to completely remove an entry from the list. You should not use msconfig to disable startup applications related to a running service. Doing so alters the registry and there are services that are essential for hardware and booting. When you uncheck a service in msconfig, you completely disable it. If you uncheck the wrong one, you may not be able to restart your computer. You should only disable services using Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services.

A better alternative is to use a startup manager like Startup Control Panel, Autoruns or Starter by CodeStuff.
If you untick an entry it will no longer run at startup. This will allow you to experiment and see how your system performs with any of them disabled. Note: some startup programs are necessary so be careful what you disable.

7 and 7a. Already answered in my previous reply.
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#8 bloomcounty

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 01:00 AM

Note: MSConfig is a troubleshooting utility used to diagnose system configuration issues. Although it works as a basic startup manager which allows you to enable/disable auto-start programs, msconfig should not be used routinely to disable startup programs. Further, msconfig does not allow you to completely remove an entry from the list. You should not use msconfig to disable startup applications related to a running service. Doing so alters the registry and there are services that are essential for hardware and booting. When you uncheck a service in msconfig, you completely disable it. If you uncheck the wrong one, you may not be able to restart your computer. You should only disable services using Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services.


These are the things I have disabled currently on my laptop (which will be getting replaced, but I was originally planning on disabling these things on the new one as well).

Posted Image

I looked up each of these and read that none of them are needed and just use up resources that don't need to be, so I turned them off in msconfig, as shown. I haven't run into any issues that I know of (but that doesn't mean there might be something I don't know of).

So what I've turned off here is bad to do?

I realize this is a bit off-topic, but I hope we can continue to discuss this... Thanks! Looking forward to hearing back! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#9 tg1911

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 01:49 AM

I think quietman7 stated it quite well:

.... msconfig should not be used routinely to disable startup programs. Further, msconfig does not allow you to completely remove an entry from the list. You should not use msconfig to disable startup applications related to a running service.....


If you want to disable programs from running at startup, use the Options menu of the program, if available, and if not, use a third party startup manager, such as the ones he suggested.
Spybot also contains a startup manager.

Also as started by quietman7, to disable Services, use "Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services."
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#10 bloomcounty

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 10:16 AM

Thanks for the reply. I don't think any of these things can be turned off in the program, because I'm almost positive I checked that first.

Are any of these services then? What I show above are all in the startup tab. I don't have anything turned off in msconfig in the services tab.

Which of those three programs suggested to you think would be best for me (i.e. easiest to use and not to mess something up). I looked at the screenshots, and it seems a little daunting...

I also see that Startup Control Panel has an installed version and an stand-alone version. What's the difference? It seems one would prefer to have something that didn't have to install, so then why two different versions? What's the advantage of one over the other?

Thanks for the help! Looking forward to hearing back! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#11 bloomcounty

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 10:09 AM

quietman7 & tg1911 -- any more thoughts/answers on this stuff? Any further assistance/information is appreciated, as always! Thanks! :thumbsup:

Edited by bloomcounty, 01 August 2007 - 10:10 AM.

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#12 quietman7

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 10:27 AM

If you are unsure what any of the startup entries are or if they are safe to disable, then search one of the following Startup Databases:
Startup Programs Database
StartupList Index

Startup Control Panel has an installed version and an stand-alone version. What's the difference?

The standalone version can be extracted and used from any location you choose. The setup version will install itself in Control Panel. Of the three startup managers, this is the most basic but probably easiest for you.
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#13 bloomcounty

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 10:37 AM

If you are unsure what any of the startup entries are or if they are safe to disable, then search one of the following Startup Databases:
Startup Programs Database
StartupList Index


Those are the lists I looked at when deciding to turn off that stuff in msconfig. :thumbsup:

I'm confused about things listed in startup in msconfig not being programs but services. Are some of the things I show in msconfig/startup as being turned off above actually "services" and should be turned off as services instead?

Or are they all startup programs that should be turned off in startup like I have them, but just not doing so with msconfig but with one of the programs you suggested instead...?

Startup Control Panel has an installed version and an stand-alone version. What's the difference?

The standalone version can be extracted and used from any location you choose. The setup version will install itself in Control Panel. Of the three startup managers, this is the most basic but probably easiest for you.


Gotcha. But what are the advantages/disadvantages of the standalone vs. the installed version? Why would anybody want to install the program when they can just use the standalone? Do both work the same exact way?

If the program is turning stuff off in Windows for you, how is that kept track of if, say, you turn startup stuff off with the standalone version, then remove the standalone version from your computer. Are the things still turned off in startup? Yet it's still different than just turning them off in msconfig like I did? How?

(I hope that question makes sense! :flowers: )

Thanks!
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#14 quietman7

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 11:03 AM

Sounds like you need to read an MSConfig Tutorial.

But what are the advantages/disadvantages of the standalone vs. the
installed version? Why would anybody want to install the program when they can
just use the standalone? Do both work the same exact way?

They both work the same. Each tab represents a place where a program can be registered to run at system startup in the registry. A disabled program will not run at system startup. MSConfig does the same thing but it was not intended to be routinely used as a startup manager.

As I said, the setup version installs in Control Panel so it can easily be located and used from there like other Control Panel entries. The standalone could be accidentially deleted or you may forget where you put it.
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#15 bloomcounty

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 11:27 AM

Sounds like you need to read an MSConfig Tutorial.


Thanks for the link. Just read it -- but it was all standard stuff I knew already. Unless I missed something, I don't think it really answered my questions...?

It also seemed to imply that it's okay to use msconfig to turn off startup stuff unless you have a lot, then it suggests using the startup manager they have available for download. But that goes against what you're saying, doesn't it?

As I said, the setup version installs in Control Panel so it can easily be located and used from there like other Control Panel entries. The standalone could be accidentially deleted or you may forget where you put it.


So when you uncheck (i.e. turn something off) in a Startup Manager, if you then look at startup in msconfig, will that item be unchecked (meaning, if I used a startup manager and unchecked the same things I have unchecked in the image above, after rechecking them in msconfig, and then looked at startup in msconfig again, would it look the same exact way as it does above?).

Thanks!
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