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Windows XP expire date approaching (4/8/2014)


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#1 Verrette

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 12:45 PM

My operating system is windows XP, and I see from the above posts that the support for Windows XP expires on 4/8/2014. So, this means I should upgrade to Windows 7 before then, correct? (I use Windows 7 at work, so i'm very familiar with that system, no big deal to me) 

What do you advise, to go out a buy "Windows 7" (like the box, with all the C.D's etc...) or buy it online to download (like on microsoft.com) I mean, is this something I can manually do easily...? You know upgrading my system from Windows XP to Windows 7....

 

My question may seem stupid for those of you that are super great at computer stuff, but I only know as much as I do to get by... LOL, I have not gone to school for computers, I just read and sponge up the information as I get it.... any replies or chat about this topic would be appreciated...  :)

 

Buy the way- LOVE THIS WEBSITE, I am so glad I stumbled upon it!

 

Thanks guys!

 


Thanks! -Stacey

(my computer info:Microsoft Windows XP - Media Center Edition Version 2002 - SP3, 64X2 Dual - Hewlett-Packard Co.)


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#2 Allan

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 12:55 PM

You can't just assume you can install W7. First, the system has to meet the minimu specs (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/system-requirements). Second, you have to be certain there are W7 drivers available for your system hardware.



#3 gefwiddo

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 01:43 PM

interesting topic verrette i like you would like to know form other members there thoughts on this, i would like to keep xp because i,m use to it never used w7 so when the date for expire arrives can we still use xp safely cheers gef.

30-06-2013.


Edited by gefwiddo, 30 June 2013 - 01:45 PM.


#4 Animal

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 01:44 PM

To see if you can even run Windows 7, as Allan advises, with your current hardware setup see here: Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor Find out if your PC can run Windows 7.

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#5 frankp316

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 05:33 PM

interesting topic verrette i like you would like to know form other members there thoughts on this, i would like to keep xp because i,m use to it never used w7 so when the date for expire arrives can we still use xp safely cheers gef.

30-06-2013.

 

 

I bought a new PC six months ago with Windows 7 pre-installed. I had never used W7 before. I don't see much difference from XP. I still do the same things I did before but it's a lot faster now.



#6 gefwiddo

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 02:48 AM

thanks for your reply frank, if i could afford a new one i probably would go for it but? being a pensioner the money aint there so have got to stick with xp for what i use my comp for its not worht me buying a new one, thanks again frank cheers gef.



#7 frankp316

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 04:27 AM

I'm on a fixed income too. I bought a "refurbished" PC via eBay for $350. The PC normally sells for $700. There are deals if you know how to look.



#8 quietman7

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 11:01 AM

Many folks get confused about buying refurbished and used computers. For those reading this topic, here is information from Microsoft explaining the difference. (scroll down to this section)

Refurbished/used PCs

Q. What is the difference between a refurbished PC and a used PC?

A. A refurbished PC is a computer system that has had substantial hardware modifications that may require a new operating system licensebecause the modifications have essentially created a "new" PC.

Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computerexcept the motherboardand still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required.

If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.

A used PC is a computer system that has had few or no hardware changes. The license for OEM software on a used PC may not be transferred to a new or different PC. However, the entire used PC, including the software media, manuals, and Certificate of Authenticity, may be transferred to another end user along with the software license rights.

Refurbished/used PCs
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#9 PanickyD

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:57 PM

To see if you can even run Windows 7, as Allan advises, with your current hardware setup see here: Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor Find out if your PC can run Windows 7.

This upgrade advisor is a pretty decent tool, but I don't know if I agree with M$ and their "minimum trquirements". I've used a Win7 machine with a 1.2Ghz proc. and 1GB of RAM and it hurt my brain. IMO, 2.2Ghz and 3GB Ram is a more realistic minimum req. It's capable, but barely.


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#10 dc3

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 09:06 AM

 

To see if you can even run Windows 7, as Allan advises, with your current hardware setup see here: Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor Find out if your PC can run Windows 7.

This upgrade advisor is a pretty decent tool, but I don't know if I agree with M$ and their "minimum trquirements". I've used a Win7 machine with a 1.2Ghz proc. and 1GB of RAM and it hurt my brain. IMO, 2.2Ghz and 3GB Ram is a more realistic minimum req. It's capable, but barely.

 

 

Microsoft is notorious for suggesting an amount of RAM which will barely make Windows crawl.


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#11 Allan

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 09:13 AM

There's a reason they call it "minimum" requirements as opposed to "suggested" configuration.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 11:55 PM

For those whom computer can run Windows 7 & installs it, or buys one with it or Windows 8 pre-installed, but prefers to keep the feel of XP, there is Classic Shell & it's free. 

 

Though I don't use it anymore on Windows 8 or 8.1, I once did & recommend the software to help those who are having a hard time adjusting. 

 

As to refurbished/used computers, proceed with caution. I once bought what was described as a refurbished laptop on eBay, complete with Windows 7 Pro & Office 2010 for $400. Only to find out 4 months later after a Windows Update that it wasn't genuine. After rebooting, was greeted with a black screen with the watermark that I may be a victim of pirated software (or similar wording, this was in 2010). 

 

Fortunately I had another of the same exact laptop years earlier (Dell Latitude D610) & though the MB went bad, I saved the software that was supplied with it, including the Dell OEM XP Pro reinstall CD. It installed & activated perfectly. 

 

Knowing what I do now, unless one truly knows the previous owner, one of the top 10 worst purchases that can be made is of a refurbished/used laptop. For starters, there is no way to know how it was treated/cared for. Many lays them on carpet to do their work/browse the net, this only serves as a mini vacuum cleaner, drawing the dust from the carpet into the laptop. This in turn clogs the heatsink, restricting airflow. It then starts to run hotter & louder (the fan will eventually run wide open). 

 

Even if the installed version of Windows is legit, the purchasing of refurbished laptops is risky at best. Large retailers & discount clubs are always running promos on brand new laptops & PC's for as little as $288, which will do for someone who only browses the net, makes transactions & checks email. For those who needs more power to run virtual machines & photo editing, another $200-400 goes a long way. Only the most serious of gamers needs the ultra expensive models. One can easily add a SSD & extra RAM for blazing speed at a fraction of what the OEM will sell it for, plus you get to keep your original HDD for backup/data. The OEM keeps your "base" HDD & installed RAM & recharges you for the upgrade(s). 

 

Fairly much the same with desktops, is dealing with the unknown. If a deal sounds too good to be true (such as a 2008 model PC loaded with Windows 7 Pro/Office 2010/Full Adobe suite) for a low amount of cash, your feeling is right, chances are it's not legit. Stay away. 

 

Times has changed, computers like other electronics has became more modern, are lighter, uses much less energy & most will allow for at least 8GB of DDR3 RAM (many ships with that amount). And the good thing about buying new versus refurbished is that it already has been certified to work with Windows 7 or 8/8.1. The deals are there, one simply has to search for them, keeping in mind to consider what you use your computer for. Don't buy a computer that is underpowered for your needs, you'll soon regret it. Fortunately, one of the major warehouse clubs in the US (Costco) allows for 90 day returns on computers/other major electronics. Buy from reputable sources. 

 

Keep in mind when you're shopping online at the OEM "outlets", where many "open box" computers are sold at a small discount, that chances are there was a legit reason why the customer didn't want the computer, or it's one that someone bought & it's a "factory refurb". That's only slightly better than 3rd party refurbs, many only has a 90 day warranty, again not worth the risk. You have a great chance of having the same issue as the original owner, only to find out after the 90 days are passed. OEM's tend to overcharge for their products anyway. 

 

As a final option, if your computer is still in good running condition & cash is tight, consider a version of Linux. Linux Mint/Ubuntu are two of the most used Linux based OS's & runs great on many computers. However if your XP powered computer is really old & doesn't support PAE, Mint 13 is as high as one can go. Still, that's support until 2017. Later models, especially those that shipped with Vista & many downgraded to XP, can run most any Linux distro. Speccy is a free tool by the writers of CCleaner, it'll show if the CPU is PAE/NX enabled. 

 

XP's out of support date is less than one month away, so I felt it best to post something in regards to it. Just don't rush to buy that refurb because a site says they'll soon be all gone. They're lying, there's been a refurb market ever since I began working with computers in 1993, it's here to stay. There are already refurb Dell XPS 8700's that cost more than mine did when new last October, some much more so & mine is i7 equipped with 12GB of DDR3 1600MHz RAM. Bought new for $699, $350 less than Dell's price for the same setup. Some refurbs are already going for over $1,000 on both Dell & eBay. Suckers are born daily, don't be a statistic. 

 

Though this has been stated before, I'll repeat it again, it's not safe to keep on using XP after end of support, just because security companies supports the OS. They do this for money, not as a favor to you. Some things, security solutions cannot protect one against. Such as unpatched code that has been patched, retreaded, & band-aided multiple times, with a final patch on April 8. The XP OS of today is similar to those old TV shows (comedies) that exposes old plumbing, with rags around the pipes, pots on the floor, homemade joints, you name it, anything except replacing to repair leaks. It's time to repair the issue by upgrading, not further repairing. 

 

Cat


My System Specs, as reported by Speccy: (Updated on 09/28/2014)
http://speccy.piriform.com/results/Zqbtq8rHKW7TgMlnluqImVN
Performance Benchmark by UserBenchmark
http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/16655
Proud Linux Mint user since 2009.


#13 TechMarvel

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 07:15 AM

Before you upgrade your computer to windows 7--check out the price of the OS.  When I checked it was around $100.

 

For a bit more ($319) than the cost of the OS, you could get a brand new computer that probably runs faster, has more memory, a bigger hard drive, and better graphics. (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883258039)

 

Or has been mentioned before, you could look at a refurbished computer.  I've had no problems with a refurb as long as it is coming from the manufacturer or a reputable company, (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883256860 -- $179, not top of the line, but much better than a 12 year old computer! )



#14 cat1092

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 12:08 AM

TechMarvel, thanks for the additional information. Your 1st solution is what I tell most everyone, Windows releases are typically 3 years apart, many can stash $15 monthly & buy a new computer with each new release & have peace of mind with a warranty (usually 1 year). For a small fee (depending on purchase price), SquareTrade will provide a warranty of up to 4 years for new computers, 2 years for refurbished ones by authorized companies. SquareTrade's fee for 4 years is often less than what the OEM/reseller charges for a 1-2 years extra.

 

And their warranty is "no hassle". If it can't be repaired at a reasonable cost, the purchase price (minux shipping & taxes) are refunded. They even provide a free shipping label, another huge savings in itself. Some type of extra warranty is a must, especially for those who cannot afford to spend $200-300 & it goes out after the 90 days.

 

Thanks for posting the words "reputable company" in there, many eBay sellers lack that rating. Many buys up lots of off lease computers for a set price, claims to refurbish them, at best many doesn't get cleaned except an exterior wipe, the temp files may be deleted, the OS may or may not be reloaded (I've seen what appeared to be lots of confidential information on the 1st one purchased with the Recuva app), some may or may not include re-install media, none has any guarantee on battery life.

 

Ask before making purchases (even from a reputable company) & keep these answers, usually an email, in your documents for future reference. Demand re-install media, or make sure they're selling one with a recovery partition. HP/Compaq computers only allows for one set of recovery media to be created during it's life, even after re-install from the utility, so if they're not included in the sale, ask for a set. Or be prepared to pay HP $25 or so for them. The recovery partition is good to have, but is useless on a dead HDD. I have installed the full backup (which one should make ASAP) to a new HDD & the recovery worked, other times it didn't.

 

My advice is to stay away from refurbished computers, regardless of source, from the XP era. In that case, it's best to keep what you have & if nothing else, install Linux Mint 13 if non-PAE (the latest that can be installed with support until 2017), or if PAE enabled, it's possible to install a newer release. Linux Mint & Ubuntu are great XP replacements & the learning curve isn't that hard for the average user. Both ships with a full Office suite in Libre Office. There's no Internet Explorer, but Firefox & Google Chrome works the same way they do in Windows. Chrome will always have the latest Flash player installed, for Firefox, Flash is a few versions behind. Any syncs of bookmarks or apps will move right over to the Linux install, once signed in. The best way to learn Linux is the same way you learned Windows. Begin with browsing & take it from there. You may find it helpful to join the forum of the OS you install, most had a "Newbies" section, where issues are dealt with quicker & where many tutorials are. I run Linux Mint 16 & am still learning.

 

This is also a good time to clean up your computer, if a desktop, this will be easier than a laptop. The main thing is to remove as much dust as possible, canned air is great for this. Just don't touch areas such as the surface of the motherboard, unless you have the skills to do so, static can fry sensitive components. With laptops, there's usually grooves where the hot air exits, this is where dust gets packed tight (& why often it sounds like it's screaming). Refer to your manual, if necessary go online & download a service manual. This will show you how to remove the optical & hard drives, plus any covers, so that with short blasts of the canned air, you can blow into the grooves mentioned previously & much of the dust will be forced out.

 

Once re-assembled, you should notice that it runs cooler & quieter. Sometimes more advanced things needs to be done, such as re-applying thermal paste, there are likely tutorials on this elsewhere in the forum. One should only need this if a basic cleaning doesn't make it run cooler (will BSOD when CPU hits it's max temp). If this is an issue, seek assistance in the proper Hardware section of the Forum.

 

Regardless of budget, anyone who doesn't want to run XP after end of support, or right now, has options.

 

Cat


My System Specs, as reported by Speccy: (Updated on 09/28/2014)
http://speccy.piriform.com/results/Zqbtq8rHKW7TgMlnluqImVN
Performance Benchmark by UserBenchmark
http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/16655
Proud Linux Mint user since 2009.





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