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Run chkdsk periodically on Windows 7?


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#1 GoshenBleeping

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 04:32 PM

I am using Windows 7 64 bit Home Edition. Is it appropriate to use chkdsk periodically to check the health of my C: & D: file systems?
Can running chkdsk cause any harm to the file system?

Thanks.

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#2 Allan

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 04:50 PM

I run chkdsk /r every few months on all systems and have always done so. No, it can not harm anything, but if you are going to run it you should run it with the recovery switch (/r)

To run checkdisk, right-click on a command prompt icon and open as administrator. In the command prompt window type: chkdsk /r (then press ENTER). You'll be told the disk is in use and asked if you want to run checkdisk on the next boot. Say yes, exit the command prompt window, and reboot.

#3 Guest_Computer-man_*

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 05:12 PM

To run checkdisk, right-click on a command prompt icon and open as administrator. In the command prompt window type: chkdsk /r (then press ENTER). You'll be told the disk is in use and asked if you want to run checkdisk on the next boot. Say yes, exit the command prompt window, and reboot.



Hi Allan,


Thank you for this note.
Last was I trying to do check my drive with chkdsk and I got an error.
But I didn't know that I must the dos prompted box must be open as Administrator, now I do know.

#4 AustrAlien

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 01:01 AM

As Allan has stated, running chkdsk every so often is a routine maintenance strategy. However, if your system has at any time suffered an untimely shutdown, such as a power blackout, a BSOD, or someone has turned off the computer using the ON/OFF button, then you should run chkdsk after any such event to repair possible file system errors.

You asked: "Can running chkdsk cause any harm to the file system?"
Yes it can, most definitely! You should exercise appropriate caution.

In the event that your hard drive has one or more bad sectors, running chkdsk /r will attempt to repair the file system error(s) and also attempt to recover data from failing areas of the disk and write that data elsewhere on the disk. This may sometimes result in the loss of data, sometimes a catastrophic loss of data. The Windows system may be rendered unbootable. Running chkdsk with the /r switch does carry an element of risk associated with it.

Reference: DjLizard's data recovery guide
  • Scroll part way down the page and read under the heading chkdsk /R.
Despite DjLizards's caution, I do occasionally use chkdsk with the /r switch, but mostly choose to use chkdsk /f ... and ONLY when I am 100% confident that there is no problem whatsoever with the hard drive.
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#5 Allan

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 08:14 AM

The other side of the coin is that if there ARE bad sectors that contain data, that in and of itself will cause problems. Running checkdisk with the /r switch is the way to mark the bad sectors as unusable (whether or not they contain data). Yes, there is a possibility of data loss, but no more so than if you don't run it and the hd is bad.




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